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For those who are voluntold or are going to volunteer for Vance AFB flight training!

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Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
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Glass cockpits came about because they're easier to scan, and provide more useful information to the pilot more rapidly. So you can stop kidding yourselves that because you fly a "glass cockpit" T-6 (haha) you are somehow more prepared for a fleet aircraft.
While I don't fly a fleet aircraft, I will say that the T-6 does not have MFDs and that is something a T-6 person will NOT be used to. Having EVERYTHING on one screen is actually overwhelming at first. It's a simple matter of training your eyes at what to look at though. ONce you get used to it, it's awesome.
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
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I can't speak for military pilots, but in the airline world it been shown over and over again that it is easier to go from steam to glass than glass to steam.

I've flown both and I think steam gauges make you develop a better scan. Further, a lot of pilots become to dependent on the glass to maintain their situational awareness. Many glass only pilots have problems visualizing where they are in relation to navaids, the field, etc when they are latter forced to fly with steam gauges.
 

FLY_USMC

Well-Known Member
pilot
Learning the rate of change and such associated with glass cockpit and digital readouts is tough. In a climb, I STILL use my ADI output for altitude, which has a digital altitude pointer that moves like the old steam gauge. It's just easier.
I agree.

So you can stop kidding yourselves that because you fly a "glass cockpit" T-6 (haha) you are somehow more prepared for a fleet aircraft. I would argue any day that the basic stick and rudder skills learned in a plane like the T-34 trump any gucci crap you may find in the T-6... plus, you don't have to deal with Air Force faggotry.
Eh, don't fly the T-6, but I stand to reason that flying every day, often twice with the Air Farce, makes you more ready for whatever follow on training you get.
 

mules83

getting salty...
pilot
A couple of weeks ago, i got checked out in a C172 G1000 cockpit (glass cockpit). Being a CFII, I was amazed how difficult, and how dangerous, it would be for a person who gets his instrument training in a glass cockpit and then fly a 'normal, round dial' cessna into imc conditions. The scan just wouldnt be there and I could see a glass cockpit pilot getting into a unusual attitude and not know what to do.
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
A couple of weeks ago, i got checked out in a C172 G1000 cockpit (glass cockpit). Being a CFII, I was amazed how difficult, and how dangerous, it would be for a person who gets his instrument training in a glass cockpit and then fly a 'normal, round dial' cessna into imc conditions. The scan just wouldnt be there and I could see a glass cockpit pilot getting into a unusual attitude and not know what to do.
Uh, that's why it's fvcking stupid to just get in an unfamiliar aircraft and fly IMC. Do that, and you're asking for a mishap.
 

mules83

getting salty...
pilot
Uh, that's why it's fvcking stupid to just get in an unfamiliar aircraft and fly IMC. Do that, and you're asking for a mishap.
I think the FAA should make an endorsement for pilots to fly glass or dial into imc conditions. i.e. if i pilot gets his instrument training in an all dial cockpit, he will need to get an endorsement to fly a glass cockpit into imc
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
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Mefesto said:
Or we could just police ourselves, and use coming f'ing sense. Oh wait... WTF am I thinking?
Yup. Government should not be the first answer. This is common sense. WHY would you even think of going into the goo in an unfamiliar aircraft? NFOD?
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
I can't speak for military pilots, but in the airline world it been shown over and over again that it is easier to go from steam to glass than glass to steam.

I've flown both and I think steam gauges make you develop a better scan. Further, a lot of pilots become to dependent on the glass to maintain their situational awareness. Many glass only pilots have problems visualizing where they are in relation to navaids, the field, etc when they are latter forced to fly with steam gauges.
That's the thing with the T-6 though. It's almost a joke of a glass cockpit. A T-6 pilot should have a similar scan as a T-34 pilot. T-6 screens are single gauges for the most part, they aren't MFD style like the T-45 or anything else.
 

Circle K

Registered User
pilot
Sort of back to the original idea behind this thread... Vance training that is... I heard a rumor yesterday, and I know it may just be a rumor, but it's worth running by this place. The word was the Navy plans on sending Maritime (P-3) selectees to Vance as well as 31 and 35 for advanced training in the T-1. I know Navy E-6 students train up there, but any chance the P-3 studs are going to be getting a little bit of that AF training?
 

highlyrandom

Naval Aviator
pilot
My aircraft selection now rests on a negative reply to the above. Ok, just kidding, but I'm sure there'll be a point when the MMA folks get their sheeit together and we need to start training maritime in twin engine jets from the get go. I'm trying to strategically miss that cutoff.

You'd have to have a split pipeline anyway, Vance for the jet flying and Corpus Christi for practice rigging ships and flying low over the water. Maybe it will become worth the effort, since I guess flying T-1s low over the Gulf leads to more "new airplane corrosion" issues than -44s.
 
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