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Random Griz Aviation Musings

wink

OLD VS NFO.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
AA did when I was there. FOs not allowed to perform and was prohibited at certain airports. Always thought it came under the heading Trying too Hard.
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
JB puts a bow on it - for you airline guys does your company allow circle to land?

Hawaiian did when I first was hired. Somewhere around 2009 they stopped being allowed unless it is VFR. Then we can do a VFR pattern around the airport to the proper runway.

I think this came from FAA guidance and is now the norm.
 
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wink

OLD VS NFO.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Hawaiian did when I first was hired. Somewhere around 2009 they stopped being allowed unless it is VFR. Then we can do a VFR pattern around the airport to the proper runway.

I thinks this came from FAA guidance and is now the norm.
I had a SIC type in the MD-80 that restricted me from circle to land. Before that it was just company policy that Capts flew the circle. Only saw it once in 30 years. Ferried a Mad Dog from ONT to LGB as a tag leg. I was a nugget. Crappy weather, short trip, never above about 10K, 4 freq changes, I was behind the plane and not all the help I could have been. In the circle the boss says, "Lost it...should see it shortly...think we are good, ah, right where it should be". Old Air Cal guy had the area memorized. If the FAA mandated dropping them for Part 121 ops it would be good with me.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
Is LAHSO a restriction for you guys? I could see it possibly being something of note for FW. It was always bizarrely amusing that it was a thing for Part 135 helicopter operations. I never did get the full story on why it was a thing, but it was in the GOM.
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
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Contributor
Years ago most airports stopped LAHSO ops, except Honolulu. Only place Hawaiian flies that still does it.

I don't think there is a 121 prohibition.
 

wink

OLD VS NFO.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
DFW used them all the time. Last time I flew the line was almost 3 years ago. They were still using them. All sorts of limitations though. Not on wet or contaminated runways, no tail wind, not at night and airplane limitations as well.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
I've heard it somewhere out west in the last year (or at least that it was in effect), that's why I was curious. I just can't remember where it was.
 

707guy

"You can't make this shit up..."
There was almost zero viz on Monday - in Reno and at Truckee. Smoke from the CA fires was very heavy. We had some diversions from Truckee right before the crash - and of course a few afterward. That aircraft was a frequent RNO visitor - went to the other FBO up the taxiway.
 

HokiePilot

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
AA did when I was there. FOs not allowed to perform and was prohibited at certain airports. Always thought it came under the heading Trying too Hard.
In DCA, the Mount Vernon Visual or ILS 1 circle to land 33 is a pretty common procedure. I will always brief the audible to 33 if we are landing that direction. And I encourage FOs to do the same thing, but I won't let a FO do it unless I have already seen them land and am confident that they can do it on a 5,200 foot runway.

But in reduced visibility or low weather, no.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
DFW used them all the time. Last time I flew the line was almost 3 years ago. They were still using them. All sorts of limitations though. Not on wet or contaminated runways, no tail wind, not at night and airplane limitations as well.
DFW still does it. It's frequently on the ATIS but they only actually use it when they need to cross taxiing traffic that landed on one of the diagonal runways (i.e. 13R taxiing inbound, crosses the far end of 18R and 18R landing traffic gets issued the LAHSO) or traffic taxiing from the farthest parallel (i.e. landed 35R and now taxiing across 35C, 35C landing traffic gets LAHSO). The available distance is still 10,000 feet. That's a pretty extraordinary airport though, normal ops are four landing runways plus two for takeoffs.

Chicago O'Hare has been doing it lately, but their taxi routes are pretty screwed up because of all the construction (screwed up even by ORD standards, which is saying a lot). Chicago also does intersection departures of 10/28 (as you're well aware) with the inbound taxi traffic threading its way along the taxiways and behind the debating traffic, which I think is a pretty smart system the way they've got it down.


OpsSpec A027 is the reference for airlines, if anybody is that interested in it.
 
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