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FY 19 IWC DCO BOARD

KeroK

Member
I am definitely aware of this challenge ahead of me, probably not fully awre of how real this problem really exists in the Navy. The context from my civ career experience is primarily project managers, who have no concept of the complexity of "the ask" but start barking orders around the tech/development teams. Also, sales guys, making promises to prospective clients, with a non-technical understanding of the product and potential R&D involved. I currently work for financial services outsourceing/tech company and there can be a serious disconnect from the people "in charge" and the people actually tasked with the work to create a solution from nothing. For these value-added process to work efficiently, without everyone hating their job, the person who I'd prefer as my manager/boss/mentor should be able to speak the same technical language to help clarify the requirements (and maybe tell off the PM who likely is asking for something unrealistic without getting appropriate buy-in first).
There are good project managers, contrary to what your post seems to imply, and there are not-so-good ones. That dichotomy applies to any profession. Good PMs do not ignorantly bark orders and act as glorified schedulers. They are the glue that holds the teams together, drives improved teamwork and communication, and builds better relationships between senior leadership and production departments. They also have the uncanny ability to know better than anyone how everything connects, and how to make it all work together more efficiently.

It sounds like you've unfortunately had some poor PMs in your civilian career, and I admit that many of the PMs I've encountered in my 10-plus career have been subpar. If you haven't guessed yet, I am a PM (whether or not I am a good one is up for debate). Fortunately, all of the PMs in my department at a major tech company are exceptional. In addition to being highly skilled at building cross-functional relationships, the best of them can give even hotshot developers a run for their money on technical language, best practices and proper processes. Any organization would be very lucky to have them.
 
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fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
Hey, have any of the selects from the March board been told that your earliest commission date will be October 2019, due to NAVRES 'running out of quotas'?

Trying to put some transparency in the Selection->COMDOCS->Swear-in process

Request any/all replies via PM.

Asking for a friend...

Thanks in advance.
 

bryanteagle6

Well-Known Member
I do know that one of our new ENS selects from the march board has received his FINSEL and he thought that he would commission this week.
So i can confirm FINSEL but not Commission

Also on topic, his process from select to FINSEL/commdocs was to the day identical to mine
 

Bones

Member
I was very quick to respond/sign/reply to everything my recruiter sent me after the selection notification, and I commissioned May 24th. Also, my OR was super responsive and all over the paperwork with very few hiccups.

Notified of "PRO-REC Y" by recruiter: April 16th
RRA/Orders Request: April 18th
DD-368 Conditional Release from Enlistment: Submitted April 23rd. Approved April 30th by PERS
Oath Issued: May 6th
Unit Assignment : May 10th
Service Agreement Received: May 20th
Oath Taken / Commissioned: May 24th

EDIT: I'm 1815 if that matters.
 
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Sculpin

Well-Known Member
Trying to put some transparency in the Selection->COMDOCS->Swear-in process
I wish to commend you on your consistent assistance to reserve officer applicants. You helped me quite a bit way back in the day, and you've helped plenty of others.

Transparency goes a long way. There's critical information that only officers with a specific designator may know, and it's on them to be able to answer them. What are the qualifications and specifics about them? What active duty work is available and how long after commissioning and where can you go? If you move for your civilian job or another reason, are you still tied to the same training unit until you qualify, or can you switch? What specific opportunities and type of work exist? And lots more questions that could be asked.

As an example of a certain designator, if you tell someone they can't apply to do anything for their first 5 years (and realistically longer than that), possibly can't deploy OCONUS ever, may get "loaned" to another unit at their own travel expense so they're a DH there, may have difficulty changing their training unit if they move, and more, well, they're going to think twice, even with all the great things, if they have a desire to do something other than "sitting around".

That knowledge and providing thorough information work directly with transparency. It's also important to be proactive with providing information. People don't know what they don't know, and won't know everything they should be asking. I think program-specific instructions, duties, etc should be shown to applicants before, and not after, selection boards. Otherwise, unless you know people like fieldrat giving you the entire lay of the land for your designator (quals, training, opportunities, month-to-month unit officer duties, etc), you're going to be in the dark on a lot of things.
 
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JRVeez3

New Member
I was hoping to throw my hat into the ring (again) for the next DCO board. Any feedback and assistance would be welcomed and greatly appreciated.

Non-selected from the IP board 8 years ago (reserve)
36/M now with USN prior service (E-5 with surface warfare - 2 deployments)
BS in IT (3.8 GPA) while on Active Duty
Dartmouth MBA
15+ years in IT, 10 or so of which in a Director/Executive role
CISSP obtained four years ago
 

bryanteagle6

Well-Known Member
Sounds good. Get good references, kill the moto statement, impress the OIC of the Region, and be prepared for the panel!

Be ready for the "why did you get out" question
 

JRVeez3

New Member
Sounds good. Get good references, kill the moto statement, impress the OIC of the Region, and be prepared for the panel!

Be ready for the "why did you get out" question
Great and thank you. As I'm starting the process again after 8 years, would I still need to work with a local reserve officer recruiter to help compile my package?
 

bryanteagle6

Well-Known Member
Of course...
How else would you get your package to the board? So dont do any of those things i said earlier until you get lined up with recruiter. Call your local NRD (i think they changed the name to NTAG or something)
 

JRVeez3

New Member
Of course...
How else would you get your package to the board? So dont do any of those things i said earlier until you get lined up with recruiter. Call your local NRD (i think they changed the name to NTAG or something)
Thank you again and that is what I figured. It has been a while since I last applied, and I remember it was a challenge getting the right recruiter who could help with the application process. Do you have any recommendations on where to start looking for the right district/recruiter in the Connecticut area?
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
Thank you again and that is what I figured. It has been a while since I last applied, and I remember it was a challenge getting the right recruiter who could help with the application process. Do you have any recommendations on where to start looking for the right district/recruiter in the Connecticut area?
Navy.com?
 

Bones

Member
Anyone have knowledge on how strict they are on the "Must complete ODS within 12 months." With my school/work schedule, It would be best for me to complete it next summer, which would be 14 months after my commissioning, still FY20 though. That being said, if it's a hard limit, I'll do what I need to do.
 

bryanteagle6

Well-Known Member
ODS is every 5 weeks starting in Jan. So youll have tons of options to take a class. I think that will make the waiver less common to just hand out. If you have some "good" reason, i have seen waivers not be much of a problem. Youll have to do the CW course too. Isnt that 8 weeks? You dont want to get too far behind.
 

Bones

Member
ODS is every 5 weeks starting in Jan. So youll have tons of options to take a class. I think that will make the waiver less common to just hand out. If you have some "good" reason, i have seen waivers not be much of a problem. Youll have to do the CW course too. Isnt that 8 weeks? You dont want to get too far behind.
Cool, appreciate the info. I have to do IWBC first.. then the CW course as I understand it. I don't mind cramming them all into the summer, it's just between working full time, teaching part time, and graduate school, my Fall/Spring semesters are toast.
 
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