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BUD/s Drop seeking information on going to OCS

SN P A

Member
Hello all,

I enlisted in the Navy last year with the hopes of becoming a SEAL. Long story short, it did not work out the way I intended. Now I am on to my next goal; OCS. I seek to earn a commission in Intelligence. With that being said, I have a few questions.

I have purchased an OAR study guide, have been taking practice tests, and have been reading threads about motivational statements. I've begun laying groundwork for LOR's as well.

What else should and can I do at this stage of my career to put my best foot forward in accomplishing this goal of mine? The Intelligence community is where I want to be, and I will do everything in my power to get there.

As a caveat, I understand that in my current situation my career is not something I have control over. My year group is largely manned and the only rates I was offered upon leaving the SEAL pipeline were the PACT programs. It is what it is, and I'm prepared to work hard in whatever program I'm assigned to for the amount of time I am assigned to it. I'd like to submit a package for OCS as soon as possible - which I have heard is immediately when I report to A-school or in a year or two. I'm expecting the latter but hoping for the former to be more the truth.

For those who may ask, I decided to enlist instead of commissioning out of the gate due to my desire to be a SEAL. Through my research, I saw myself fitting in more with the enlisted side of the house in NSW rather than the Officers. Additionally, with the caliber of candidates the pipeline is attracting these days, I did not believe I would be competitive enough to earn a spot in the training as an Officer. In hindsight, I would make the same choice every time. But now it's time for another path.

Thank you for your time, and in advance, for any insight or direction you may choose to give.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Couple of questions. First, how much do you know about what an Intel Officer does? It’s probably not what you think, and there are a lot of misconceptions out there. Caveat emptor. Second, what’s your degree in? The IW community has some pretty specific requirements.

To be perfectly honest with you, if all they’re offering you now is PACT programs, it’s very likely going to be a couple years before you’re able to apply for OCS. You’re very likely going to go to your first command, then spend some time getting your initial qualifications, which most COs are going to expect before they get behind any bid for OCS. There may be some exceptions, but be prepared for a long road ahead.
 

Pags

Positive Void Coefficient
pilot
When I was Mini on an LHD we got a couple of BUDs drops in the Air Department. They were all very strong sailors, good attitudes, hard workers, etc who usually quickly qualified and then matriculated on to other places where they fit better. A couple of them did talk with us AirOs about going to OCS. We were always more than willing to help but as Brett said it can be a long road.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
For those who may ask, I decided to enlist instead of commissioning out of the gate due to my desire to be a SEAL. Through my research, I saw myself fitting in more with the enlisted side of the house in NSW rather than the Officers. Additionally, with the caliber of candidates the pipeline is attracting these days, I did not believe I would be competitive enough to earn a spot in the training as an Officer. In hindsight, I would make the same choice every time. But now it's time for another path.

Thank you for your time, and in advance, for any insight or direction you may choose to give.
Going SEAL is one of the few times I wouldn't ask why you why you went enlisted.

I would ask what is your degree and GPA, as Intel is very competitive.
 

SN P A

Member
Going SEAL is one of the few times I wouldn't ask why you why you went enlisted.

I would ask what is your degree and GPA, as Intel is very competitive.
My degree is in International Finance and Middle Eastern Studies and I graduated with a pretty subpar (for Intel) 3.25. I'm hoping I can make up some ground with other aspects of my application.
 

SN P A

Member
Couple of questions. First, how much do you know about what an Intel Officer does? It’s probably not what you think, and there are a lot of misconceptions out there. Caveat emptor. Second, what’s your degree in? The IW community has some pretty specific requirements.

To be perfectly honest with you, if all they’re offering you now is PACT programs, it’s very likely going to be a couple years before you’re able to apply for OCS. You’re very likely going to go to your first command, then spend some time getting your initial qualifications, which most COs are going to expect before they get behind any bid for OCS. There may be some exceptions, but be prepared for a long road ahead.
I've spoken with Intel Officers from the Army and Air Force prior to joining the Navy so I know vaguely what's involved. I understand it's a lot of PowerPoint, briefing, analysis, and otherwise non-sexy work. My degree is in International Finance and Middle Eastern Studies. I took a look and I have 3 semesters of college math (Business Calculus and Statistics), and if I'm remembering correctly, that meets the IWC requirement.

I appreciate the honesty. I know that anything worth having is worth putting in the time and effort for, and I plan to make the most of my time before attending OCS - whenever that may be.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
My degree is in International Finance and Middle Eastern Studies and I graduated with a pretty subpar (for Intel) 3.25. I'm hoping I can make up some ground with other aspects of my application.
I was concerned you had like a 2.6 or something, with a 3.25 you are on the lower side but it is worth a shot, I mean of those picked up at least someone like you is on the dart board so to speak.
 

IwannabeaPHROGdvr69

Well-Known Member
pilot
I've spoken with Intel Officers from the Army and Air Force prior to joining the Navy so I know vaguely what's involved. I understand it's a lot of PowerPoint, briefing, analysis, and otherwise non-sexy work. My degree is in International Finance and Middle Eastern Studies. I took a look and I have 3 semesters of college math (Business Calculus and Statistics), and if I'm remembering correctly, that meets the IWC requirement.

I appreciate the honesty. I know that anything worth having is worth putting in the time and effort for, and I plan to make the most of my time before attending OCS - whenever that may be.
Not sure how long it has been since you have been out of BUD/S, but based on you having the desire to be a SEAL in the first place you may end up unhappy if you go the intel route and aren't even a line officer. Would take some time to consider what you really want. It probably isn't that.
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor
My degree is in International Finance and Middle Eastern Studies and I graduated with a pretty subpar (for Intel) 3.25. I'm hoping I can make up some ground with other aspects of my application.
Within that time doing Middle Eastern Studies did you pick up any language skills?
 

Michael_J_Caboose

PRO-REC Y Intel
I was concerned you had like a 2.6 or something, with a 3.25 you are on the lower side but it is worth a shot, I mean of those picked up at least someone like you is on the dart board so to speak.
I'm not sure if it will help, but I have a low overall GPA despite my graduation being at 3.87 because I did not care about school back in 06-08 (I had a 2.25 GPA). I put that in my motivational statement in hopes that whoever reads it takes that into account.
 

wink

OLD VS NFO.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
eh, none of the Intel "guys" I had picked up/at my NRD had any foreign language skills and the Intel officers we had doing recruiting said no matter what the PA says it isn't a factor.
I have never understood that. Not because your average INTEL weenie needs language, but because I think it is a benefit to any officer, especially with native use. It is short sighted. It should carry some weight. The Navy talks big about diversity but someone who lived overseas, learned a new culture and language doesn't get a break over the dude that spent a semester at McGill University in Montreal. When I was at NAVEUR I only met one active duty guy with significant language ability. But lots of guys in my Reserve unit had foreign language experience owing to the fact so many were expats. They often got orders and special gigs the active guys were less qualified to cover.
 
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