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1,001 questions about the ASTB (post your scores & ask your questions here!)

Yameyantok

New Member
Hey y'all! Just retook the ASTB today and scored 50 6/7/7, an improvement from my first attempt (42 4/5/5)!

All in all, studied for ~3 months, 4-6 hours a day (though had many days where I couldn't do that, so maybe 2hrs at the most for bad days). I also brought snacks this time.

For the math and mechanical comprehension sections, make sure you're familiar with all rules, formulas, and laws. In the MST, they do provide a list of formulas, but it's much more efficient to have an arsenal of formulas ready in your noggin. Besides the study guides mentioned below, Khan Academy and this GRE book helped tremendously.

The Barron's book had most everything I needed to know for the ANIT. Trivium helped a bit too. A few other resources found on this forum (listed below) and from random Google searches helped out as well. I can't say that you'll know everything from studying these guides, so just obtain as much random information as you can.

PBM: I'll try not to repeat what has already been said, so my advice is to prioritize quality and accuracy, take a deep breath, and go. There is a practice section for the UAV portion that you can take as many times as you want. Ace that a few times before proceeding to the actual UAV portion.
I wrote down all instructions and displayed them in front of me for the relevant portions. For example, for the dichotic listening, let's say that clutch is for odd numbers and the trigger for even numbers, I wrote "ODD" on the left side and "EVEN" on the right side of a folded piece of paper. This (writing the directions) is most important for the Emergency Procedures.

Below are the posts that I found most helpful, but it doesn't hurt to look around this forum for more. Just make sure you give yourself enough time to fully soak in all the information.
These YouTube videos helped with familiarizing myself with Aviation and Nautical Information:
Do the practice problems and tests and make sure you know how to do the problems you get wrong (I know that's kind of obvious, but it's easy to be lazy).

Study smart, study hard, take deep breaths, bring water, bring snacks (and/or mints), aim high, and slay it.
 
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Danielle29

New Member
Hey y'all! Just retook the ASTB today and scored 50 6/7/7, an improvement from my first attempt (42 4/5/5)!

All in all, studied for ~3 months, 4-6 hours a day (though had many days where I couldn't do that, so maybe 2hrs at the most for bad days). I also brought snacks this time.

For the math and mechanical comprehension sections, make sure you're familiar with all rules, formulas, and laws. In the MST, they do provide a list of formulas, but it's much more efficient to have an arsenal of formulas ready in your noggin. Besides the study guides mentioned below, Khan Academy and this GRE book helped tremendously.

The Barron's book had most everything I needed to know for the ANIT. Trivium helped a bit too. A few other resources found on this forum (listed below) and from random Google searches helped out as well. I can't say that you'll know everything from studying these guides, so just obtain as much random information as you can.

PBM: I'll try not to repeat what has already been said, so my advice is to prioritize quality and accuracy, take a deep breath, and go. There is a practice section for the UAV portion that you can take as many times as you want. Ace that a few times before proceeding to the actual UAV portion.
I wrote down all instructions and displayed them in front of me for the relevant portions. For example, for the dichotic listening, let's say that clutch is for odd numbers and the trigger for even numbers, I wrote "ODD" on the left side and "EVEN" on the right side of a folded piece of paper. This (writing the directions) is most important for the Emergency Procedures.

Below are the posts that I found most helpful, but it doesn't hurt to look around this forum for more. Just make sure you give yourself enough time to fully soak in all the information.
These YouTube videos helped with familiarizing myself with Aviation and Nautical Information:
Do the practice problems and tests and make sure you know how to do the problems you get wrong (I know that's kind of obvious, but it's easy to be lazy).

Study smart, study hard, take deep breaths, bring water, bring snacks (and/or mints), aim high, and slay it.
NICELY done! I applaud you! Quick question, when you took the test, did you have any practice time for the emergency section of the PBM? And did you do BI-RV at all? When I took my first test, I didn't get that at all and I'm not sure if I should bring it up before I ask someone here!
 

Danielle29

New Member
From my earlier post:

Last but not least for the PBM section, Emergencies:
So while not talked about a lot, this section is the final section of the test and your scores will be calculated the second after this test finishes.

While you are doing the vertical and 2d tracking, you have three different emergencies that could happen (Engine, Fire and Propeller.) My piece of advice is write down the reaction to the emergencies on the scratch paper provided and set in front of you to look at once you get the first warning of an emergency (flash of red with the emergency highlighted.) These included for a fire you set the engine rpm to 0%, the fuel to 0% and pressed the clutch button. Engine, rpm to 100%, fuel to 100% and press the clutch button. Last it was propeller, set engine to 100% and fuel to 50% and press the button. Place priority on finishing the emergency as fast as possible and either you can track the aircraft this whole time or finish the emergency and go back to tracking to wait for the next one to appear. Mine all happened within about 3 seconds of finishing the last and I would say I did a pretty good job of tracking while the emergencies persisted.
Thank you so much for this input!!
 

Yameyantok

New Member
NICELY done! I applaud you! Quick question, when you took the test, did you have any practice time for the emergency section of the PBM? And did you do BI-RV at all? When I took my first test, I didn't get that at all and I'm not sure if I should bring it up before I ask someone here!
Thank you! And no, there was no practice time for the emergency section.
 

Danielle29

New Member
Can someone please explain what the reading section is trying to look for? When I took it, it gave me a paragraph then four choices that's similar to each other and relates to the paragraph? Thank you!
 

seattleite

New Member
I finally took the test this week, both happy that it's over and a little bummed because I didn't meet my goal score.

It's been said before, but you are going to feel like you are failing. I had easy reading problem after easy reading problem, and some of the Aviation questions seemed impossible and some were more like "Do airplanes have wings." I actually almost quit after the OAR portion because I thought I was doing so poorly, I thought I would study more and hit it again in November.

Study the Gouge on here, buy at least 3 different practice books and do all of the practice tests. Don't write in your answer books, that way you can do them over and over again without psyching yourself out.

Practice your UAV cards, get so you can do that whole set of 65 flashcards in under 3 minutes.

Also, I absolutely failed at the practical part of the PBM. I don't play video games, and I spent half my time trying to get the throttle to stay attached to the desk. Focus on the even/odd numbers in your ears. I repeated the value in the ear I was listening to out loud, (this part runs slow so you have time) and I think that really helped. As far as the "Flipped Axis" that everyone talks about, don't think about it like that. Instead, pretend you're in a jet looking at the tail end of a jet in front of you. That other jet is the dot on your screen. Your screen is a giant Attitude indicator, with the horizon right through the center of it, Note: there is actually no horizontal line through the screen, you have to make that part up on your own. The jet is above the halfway mark on your screen, he's above you and you're going to need to pull up to catch him. If he's below the halfway mark, push yourself over to catch up with him below you.

A note about the math section, I got two pieces of paper in the room, and I almost asked for more because I like to write my thoughts out. I had to erase notes on the break to get more space. If you know you like to write out your thoughts, make sure you have more than one piece of paper in there. You'll need space to make your compass for the UAV portion and write out the emergency procedures for the flight.

Anyway, good luck folks :) ASTB: 73 9/7/8
 

seattleite

New Member
Can someone please explain what the reading section is trying to look for? When I took it, it gave me a paragraph then four choices that's similar to each other and relates to the paragraph? Thank you!
You're just looking for the only statement that is true based on what is ACTUALLY STATED in the document. Make sure you don't infer anything, if they don't tell you that Mars is smaller than Saturn, you can't choose an answer that says that.
 

Codeman98

New Member
I finally took the test this week, both happy that it's over and a little bummed because I didn't meet my goal score.

It's been said before, but you are going to feel like you are failing. I had easy reading problem after easy reading problem, and some of the Aviation questions seemed impossible and some were more like "Do airplanes have wings." I actually almost quit after the OAR portion because I thought I was doing so poorly, I thought I would study more and hit it again in November.

Study the Gouge on here, buy at least 3 different practice books and do all of the practice tests. Don't write in your answer books, that way you can do them over and over again without psyching yourself out.

Practice your UAV cards, get so you can do that whole set of 65 flashcards in under 3 minutes.

Also, I absolutely failed at the practical part of the PBM. I don't play video games, and I spent half my time trying to get the throttle to stay attached to the desk. Focus on the even/odd numbers in your ears. I repeated the value in the ear I was listening to out loud, (this part runs slow so you have time) and I think that really helped. As far as the "Flipped Axis" that everyone talks about, don't think about it like that. Instead, pretend you're in a jet looking at the tail end of a jet in front of you. That other jet is the dot on your screen. Your screen is a giant Attitude indicator, with the horizon right through the center of it, Note: there is actually no horizontal line through the screen, you have to make that part up on your own. The jet is above the halfway mark on your screen, he's above you and you're going to need to pull up to catch him. If he's below the halfway mark, push yourself over to catch up with him below you.

A note about the math section, I got two pieces of paper in the room, and I almost asked for more because I like to write my thoughts out. I had to erase notes on the break to get more space. If you know you like to write out your thoughts, make sure you have more than one piece of paper in there. You'll need space to make your compass for the UAV portion and write out the emergency procedures for the flight.

Anyway, good luck folks :) ASTB: 73 9/7/8
Thanks for the post, do you remember what kind of math problems you got?
 

seattleite

New Member
Thanks for the post, do you remember what kind of math problems you got?
Lots of simplifying equations, logs and probability. I had a few rate/time and lots of volume/area questions. They give you volume/are equations so you don't need to use brain space on those. I didn't get any matrix questions, but I read they are more common now.
 

Danielle29

New Member
Hey guys

Does anyone know and explain what’s the appendix bravo? I tried looking online and the book given to me but I’m really unsure and want to study about it. Thanks!
 

wcisel77

New Member
Hello Airwarriors!

I’ve used this site pretty extensively the past month or two preparing for my test and now that it’s finally over I feel as though I owe the community a huge thank you and some insight to my experience that may offer some others some much needed help. My main study material used was the Barron’s ASTB test prep, Youtube, Kahns Academy, and lastly this amazing forum.

Took the test on October 9th for the first time and scored a 55 7/8/8

Math Skills Test

I was pretty behind the game studying for this, I’m 29 years old and haven’t taken a math class in quite some time. With that being said I started off using the Barron’s ASTB prep book that so many others have mentioned before. I went over the math section until I knew how to do every problem and this involved a lot of hours on YouTube, and Kahn’s academy…I’m almost embarrassed to say the first day I was googling how to do long division again – yes it was that bad. Now that we’re all carrying around cellphones with calculators it’s not very often we do problems by hand anymore. I will say that these test prep books WILL NOT prepare you as much as you need for the test but they are a good start. I’ll attach another study guide I found from these forums at the bottom that’s more advanced you will need to know. Pay particular attention to probability, exponent equations, averages of #’s, and DTR problems. I didn’t see any logarithm questions, but that’s probably because I wasn’t doing good enough to get them. Also keep in mind there’s a formulas tab on the side that’s available during your math test that tells you the formulas for a lot of geometry problems and Pi which is helpful because you don’t need to memorize it.

Reading Comprehension Test

There’s really nothing to say here other than the paragraphs are long and extremely dry mostly relating to the military. My advice is to take your time and read the material carefully. Go over the answers one by one and rule them out. ONLY USE the knowledge gained in the paragraph to answer the questions, don’t assume anything or use outside knowledge. I only used the two-practice test in the Barron’s book to prepare for this portion. I also ran out of time on this section, but I was going for accuracy over speed.

Mechanical Comprehension

The Barron’s prep book does an excellent job preparing you for this section, but take it a step further and learn about Pulleys, and Levers (know all 3 types) especially. Know how to calculate the distance to balance a fulcrum with two weights on either end. Also know about Bernoulli’s law which comes into play for the ANIT section as well. Overall for myself this section is a lot of common-sense type problems and questions. If you understand problems that say “If this happens, what will this do” you should be okay here.

Aviation and Nautical Information

For this section I used the Barron’s book again, and a set of flash cards that I’ll have to give credit to someone else for making on this forum. Additionally, from someone else’s recommendation I also used the FAA Pilot’s handbook of Aeronautical knowledge. Know every single part of the aircraft and exactly what it does and what effect it will have on the plane. You’ll also need to know about general airspace knowledge as well as the history of naval aviation which I think is covered pretty well in the note cards I’ll link at the bottom. This section isn’t just about planes though, you will be asked about ship terms as well so be prepared for that. Overall, I think I did the best in this section or at least I was the most confident.

Naval Aviation Trait Facet Inventory

This section just sucks and there’s no preparing for it. You will choose between two answers that describe you and the answers they give you are pretty horrible and most likely won’t ever be what you actually would do. However, you just need to pick the best answer.

PBM

You’ll start with the spatial orientation tests, which if you follow the advice of everyone and just use the damn compass trick, you’ll ace this section. That’s all I did and I managed to get every one in about 1.2-1.5 seconds with only 1 mistake.

Dichotic listening – I just removed the earmuff that wasn’t my target ear and it made this extremely easy. It’s a little tricky to do when you’re tracking the targets and listening at the same time, but if you’re quick enough I think it makes this section a breeze.

Tracking – I bought a stick and throttle and played some hours on Warthunder, but I’m not sure how much it helped because the actually PBM is just different in general. It was nice to already have a feel of the controls though. So overall, I would say it definitely helped me in that aspect. I will say again what everyone has before me – this section is rough and it’s going to be a complete mess, but just stay calm and continue tracking the targets as best as you can. Don’t give up and just stick through with it to the end. At times I was no where near either target and still scored very well on this section. DON’T FORGET to write your emergency procedures down and do them quickly and accurately. I stopped tracking completely and took care of the emergencies in about 2-3 seconds then went back to tracking.



Below is all the study material I used, if anyone has any questions feel free to ask and sorry about the novel I posted. I hope someone can use this and benefit from it, like I benefited from so many others experiences before me. Last but not least, the biggest wealth of knowledge is on these forums. I gained more from these forums then I did form any single study material.

Thank you again everyone, I couldn’t have done it without you!


UAV Flash cards - https://www.proprofs.com/flashcards/story.php?title=_36014
ANIT Flash cards - https://www.cram.com/flashcards/astb-aviation-nautical-information-test-anit-comprehensive-4718163
 

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