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Random Griz Aviation Musings

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor

jmcquate

Well-Known Member
Contributor
@wink you should read this article.


The army just started a giant divestment project of extra "stuff" in museums. This includes the Army Aviation Museum. If your guys need anything for your ground displays or maybe even some odd ball tool, this is an excellent opportunity. I happen to know there are a number of air frames on the disposal list.
I know that it's extremely difficult (or at least it used to be) to acquire a post WWII military aircraft from the DoD. Most that you see flying are foreign exports. Do the same rules apply for Army rotary?
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor
I know that it's extremely difficult (or at least it used to be) to acquire a post WWII military aircraft from the DoD. Most that you see flying are foreign exports. Do the same rules apply for Army rotary?
It depends on the end user. Many will be plane-on-a-stick worthy but a few are flight capable with some work. If it had combat systems on board those are likely gone. If it was a scout or troop transport there are no systems to worry about.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Saw a CAP C172 at home plate the other day. Was left outside a mechanic's hangar. Oil, filter tube and tire left out as well. Have no idea why they were there. No CAP at my field. Also no FBOs. Hate to say it, but this mechanic is past his prime. His unlicensed son does 90% the work. I have caught serious lapses in quality and detail by these guys. The hangar is a cluttered mess. They are good people. Have helped me in a pinch once or twice. But I would not let them do anything but an oil or tire change followed by your best preflight. Doesn't the CAP have a contract at a local FBO for that kind of thing?

The aircraft was beautiful. Washed and waxed. Leather upholstery with embroidered insignia. Interesting drop window for the back left pax.
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Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor
Saw a CAP C172 at home plate the other day. Was left outside a mechanic's hangar. Oil, filter tube and tire left out as well. Have no idea why they were there. No CAP at my field. Also no FBOs. Hate to say it, but this mechanic is past his prime. His unlicensed son does 90% the work. I have caught serious lapses in quality and detail by these guys. The hangar is a cluttered mess. They are good people. Have helped me in a pinch once or twice. But I would not let them do anything but an oil or tire change followed by your best preflight. Doesn't the CAP have a contract at a local FBO for that kind of thing?

The aircraft was beautiful. Washed and waxed. Leather upholstery with embroidered insignia. Interesting drop window for the back left pax.
View attachment 28409View attachment 28410View attachment 28411
That is a nice ship. The fancy seats probably makes it the Wing Commanders.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
Saw a CAP C172 at home plate the other day. Was left outside a mechanic's hangar. Oil, filter tube and tire left out as well. Have no idea why they were there. No CAP at my field. Also no FBOs. Hate to say it, but this mechanic is past his prime. His unlicensed son does 90% the work. I have caught serious lapses in quality and detail by these guys. The hangar is a cluttered mess. They are good people. Have helped me in a pinch once or twice. But I would not let them do anything but an oil or tire change followed by your best preflight. Doesn't the CAP have a contract at a local FBO for that kind of thing?

The aircraft was beautiful. Washed and waxed. Leather upholstery with embroidered insignia. Interesting drop window for the back left pax.
View attachment 28409View attachment 28410View attachment 28411
@wink was this at KMGM? Its an older 172N with 180HP upgrade. That's a camera window that hinges open to accommodate a standard issue Nikon DSLR with stabilized lens setup (and ability to digitally transmit images in near real time) - poor mans ISR. The CAP wings are organized by state and region (regions roughly mapped to FEMA regions). The MO's have a lot of latitude on contracting locally for maint - generally its someone who knows someone etc. This particular airplane is actually based at Maxwell AFB. CAP National HQ is at Maxwell - so that accounts for the primo gucci interior.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
I think everyone knows to not rely on fuel gauges as the sole source of your true fuel state. In GA aircraft that can't be more true. GA fuel gauges are notoriously worthless. I have always dipped my tanks with a dowel I personally calibrated. So, I began the process of emptying the tanks in my Luscombe so I could refill in increments and calibrate a dip stick. Nowhere is it written in the 5 page 😱 operating handbook ( certified in the late 1930s ) in what attitude the fuel gauges are calibrated. I assumed it is level flight. But it is on the deck with the tail dragging is where you decide whether or not to fly. So how off are the 1940s mechanical fuel gages on the deck versus level flight? Frustratingly, very. The right tank was bouncing on empty in flight and solidly on empty on the deck. A condition I had planned to facilitate so I could drain the tank. But then saintly Mrs Wink decided we should fly the other day. Not wanting to put more gas in the tank I intended to drain, I thought I'd put some insurance in the left tank for a 30-60 minute flight. Left tank was reading less than 1/4 tank on the deck. 12.5 gal tank, I am guessing there is about 3 gal in the tank. Cruise is about 4.5-5 gph. Pattern work and you are over 6 gph. So I decided to put 6 gal in the left tank giving me a known metered amount of 6 gal and probably about 9 gal in the 12.5 gal tank. At 5 gal dispensed and at nearly full flow rate I get major spill over. Stinky ugly mess! The filler is too narrow to see in and you can't hear or feel the tank filling up like I could my C-170. I now know that the fuel gauges, on the deck, read approximately 3 gallons low. That is a 25% error, but fortunately resulting in more gas on hand than indicated. Needless to say I am very eager to drain and stick the tanks. Many more contemporary planes have commercially available dip sticks, but for the most accurate results, make your own for your aircraft. 28477
Right tank gauge. Has run quite a while on the deck in this condition. Don't know how much will drain out.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
GA fuel gauges are notoriously worthless.
Amen! My students are instructed from FAM-1 to physically climb up on wing and manually dip each fuel tank before each and every flight - even on interim stops on a XC or a rest stop. (that and complete 360 degree walk around and verify fuel caps secure before every man-up) The companion post to this of course is "what's the fastest time for removing dropped dipstick from fuel tank" - 45 minutes, with straightened wire coat hanger as preferred tool. It sucks! (students drop stick in fuel tank, CFI to rescue to fish it out after receiving panicked phone call from student)
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Amen! My students are instructed from FAM-1 to physically climb up on wing and manually dip each fuel tank before each and every flight - even on interim stops on a XC or a rest stop. (that and complete 360 degree walk around and verify fuel caps secure before every man-up) The companion post to this of course is "what's the fastest time for removing dropped dipstick from fuel tank" - 45 minutes, with straightened wire coat hanger as preferred tool. It sucks! (students drop stick in fuel tank, CFI to rescue to fish it out after receiving panicked phone call from student)
Wow. Lost stick in a tank? Guess that is why I always had dowels too long to drop in. Never knew it though.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
Wow. Lost stick in a tank? Guess that is why I always had dowels too long to drop in. Never knew it though.
Oh no, its the full size commercial sticks that are long - people still find a way to get them stuck in the tank :)

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