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Random Griz Aviation Musings

ea6bflyr

Working Class Bum
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Since we already know @mad dog is a hoarder and is willing to publicly own it, what other weird stuff is he hoarding that he won't share with the world? I mean he's married so you'd think that would be a forcing function to get rid of crap...so what didn't survive the purges?

All his baby teeth?
His teenaged collection of dog eared nudie mags?
Something even weirder...like Norman Bates weird?
I hear he has a sick set of rings:
28003
 

navybratmom

New Member
Every 8 weeks...reminds me of this story. It wasn't just about repairing ships...

Odd since much of the Constitution was constructed with Southern Live Oaks (because it lasts much longer than white oak) that came from south Georgia, not too far from where the King's Bay base is. And the recent repairs used mostly Live Oak.

 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
Tough day yesterday - one of my club aircraft suffered an engine failure resulting in an off field landing in a cornfield 1.5 miles from home field resulting in substantial damage to the aircraft (total loss). The pilot, an experienced CFI colleague and his pilot passenger walked away without a scratch. The engine failure occurred at 3000' MSL in IMC, and the aircraft broke out to visual conditions only at 600' AGL

The engine failure began after departure from a nearby airport where the aircraft was undergoing avionics upgrades and removal of the engine driven vacuum system (dual G5 electronic flight instruments replaced the vacuum powered AI and DC powered HSI). The engine operated normally after takeoff and shortly after cruise, engine oil pressure went to zero followed by caution/warning. Engine made partial power as the crew declared the emergency and attempted to turn towards the airport. Shortly after that the engine lost all power, the pilot set best glide...

You can see the pics below. Aircraft touchdown around 70 KIAS, and impacted two trees, destroying both wings, and emptying the fuel tanks. The cabin held together -and the landing gear was not compromised.

NTSB and FAA are coming tomorrow to do the engine inspection. FAA released the aircraft to me yesterday and local news covered the accident.

Amazing bit of airmanship.

View attachment 27847

View attachment 27848

View attachment 27849

View attachment 27850
NTSB Prelim Investigation is out:

On October 28, 2020, about 1145 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182T airplane, N3537C, was
substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lebanon, Ohio. The pilot and
passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal
Regulations Part 91 personal flight.
The pilot stated he and the passenger were ferrying the airplane from Clermont County Airport
(I69), Ohio, to Warren County Airport (I68), Ohio following maintenance to install new
avionics. While flying at 3,000 ft mean sea level (MSL) in instrument meteorological
conditions the oil pressure dropped to zero. The engine initially ran smooth but began
knocking and vibrating. The pilot declared an emergency and proceeded direct to I68, but was
unable to maintain altitude. The airplane broke clear of the clouds about 600 ft above the
ground and the engine subsequently lost all power. Unable to make the runway, the pilot
elected to land in a harvested corn field. The pilot could not stop the airplane before it hit trees
at the end of the field, damaging the airplane’s wings and fuselage.
The engine was examined, and a brightly colored plastic cap was found installed on the
crankcase breather port, which completely blocked the port. The engine crankcase seal on the
front of the engine was found dislodged and oil was found on the underside of engine
compartment and cowling.
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Contributor
NTSB Prelim Investigation is out:

On October 28, 2020, about 1145 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182T airplane, N3537C, was
substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lebanon, Ohio. The pilot and
passenger were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal
Regulations Part 91 personal flight.
The pilot stated he and the passenger were ferrying the airplane from Clermont County Airport
(I69), Ohio, to Warren County Airport (I68), Ohio following maintenance to install new
avionics. While flying at 3,000 ft mean sea level (MSL) in instrument meteorological
conditions the oil pressure dropped to zero. The engine initially ran smooth but began
knocking and vibrating. The pilot declared an emergency and proceeded direct to I68, but was
unable to maintain altitude. The airplane broke clear of the clouds about 600 ft above the
ground and the engine subsequently lost all power. Unable to make the runway, the pilot
elected to land in a harvested corn field. The pilot could not stop the airplane before it hit trees
at the end of the field, damaging the airplane’s wings and fuselage.
The engine was examined, and a brightly colored plastic cap was found installed on the
crankcase breather port, which completely blocked the port. The engine crankcase seal on the
front of the engine was found dislodged and oil was found on the underside of engine
compartment and cowling.
The thumbs down is for the blocked port aspect of the story. Thumbs up for airmanship!
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
Kind of surprised the temp plug held and instead blew the crankcase seal.
That is a screw in hard plastic plug - it was in there pretty good! The question is what was chain that allowed work to remove the vacuum system to be supervised and inspected where this was missed. That will be a few more months down the road.

I'm looking actively for a replacement 182T (or 182S) - and the market is pretty tough right now - demand is high. I'm not sure I can replace it for its insured value of $250K.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
“Oh shit, oh shit, oh shit...” pretty much the sound track for that movie!

Can we assume they survived?
Yes! Looks like they landed well off the originating airport. An AA 777 FO with a pretty decent YouTube channel breaks it down (I believe he's a former AF C-141 dude)

 
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