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Random Griz Aviation Musings

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
But venison is sooooo good!

The meat might taste a bit funny though if the animal died in a moment of getting the shit scared out of it.
Is that what they mean by “gamey?”
 

jmcquate

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Go back to to what Mom said. What if you end up up in the the hospital with dirty underwear, Don't fuck with Mom...........Nimitz class or actual.
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot
I have not flown any form in ... well, a while. Flew as dash-2 behind a T-34B. The dad of my young student owns a T-34B, and he and mom met us at KLUK to watch their son do his towered airport solo. With solo complete, dad suggested a form flight home - so we departed as the most dissimilar form flight ever - T-34B in lead and wingman in the C172. Joinup was a joke - took me forever to get inside his turn. But finally at full throttle and lead almost in slow flight we managed to get in some semblance of parade formation. It was fun! I am promised a solo checkout in the T-34, so i will keep you guys posted.

26691
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
I flew a T-34B quite regularly back in 1985-1989 when I was at Moffett Field. My parents lived in Monterey and the Navy Post Graduate School there had a better flying club than Moffett. It was an hour or so drive so I’d go on the weekends and work on my various flying license. Did multi private, instrument, commercial single and commercial multi at that flying club. They had 2 T-34Bs that were cheaper to fly (gifts from Navy so only maintenance expense to club) than a C-172RG so I did my commercial single in a T-34B. I also did most of my just for fun flying in them. I have close to 200 hours in the T-34B.

I flew either the T-34B, a Cessna 150 Aerobat or a Grumman Cougar (twin) for my messing around. Self taught some sloppy aerobatics in the 150 without killing myself. Went out in the T-34B with one of my squadron’s DH who taught in them in a VT to try it. Could loop or split S and that was about it. The Navy put rudder limiters in them prior to giving them to flying clubs to keep them from doing aerobatics.

Later when the main spar AD came out, that was the end of them at Navy flying clubs.
 
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AllAmerican75

Back to School!
None
Contributor
I flew a T-34B quite regularly back in 1985-1989 when I was at Moffett Field. My parents lived in Monterey and the Navy Post Graduate School there had a better flying club than Moffett. It was an hour or so drive so I’d go on the weekends and work on my various flying license. Did multi private, instrument, commercial single and commercial multi at that flying club. They had 2 T-34Bs that were cheaper to fly (gifts from Navy so only maintenance expense to club) than a C-172RG so I did my commercial single in a T-34B. I also did most of my just for fun flying in them. I have close to 200 hours in the T-34B.

I flew either the T-34B, a Cessna 150 Aerobat or a Grumman Cougar (twin) for my messing around. Self taught some sloppy aerobatics in the 150 without killing myself. Went out in the T-34B with one of my squadron’s DH who taught in them in a VT to try it. Could loop or split S and that was about it. The Navy put rudder limiters in them prior to giving them to flying clubs to keep them from doing aerobatics.

Later when the main spar AD came out, that was the end of them at Navy flying clubs.
They still have a T-34B left. I wish I had the time to fly. Maybe in the Fall when we're done with this Coronavirus business and my thesis is completed.

https://www.montereynavyflyingclub.org/index.htm
 

ChuckMK23

Well-Known Member
pilot

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
A crash damaged Cirrus SR-20 showed up here on a flat bed trailer - presumably to be rebuilt:
View attachment 26706

Here's the mishap summary:

Stalls in the pattern happen a lot with this type. People seem to be afraid of adding too much power on a go-around.
 

nittany03

Big hairy American winning machine
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Stalls in the pattern happen a lot with this type. People seem to be afraid of adding too much power on a go-around.
That's . . . a unique phrase. I mean I get being being smooth and coordinating rudder with power additions on a single-engine prop. But ultimately, in any bugsmasher I flew, a go-around is a go-around. Throttle you're not using to get away from the dirt is kind of a silly thing to keep in your pocket. Are instructors teaching something weird, or is it just new-student-itis?
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
That's . . . a unique phrase. I mean I get being being smooth and coordinating rudder with power additions on a single-engine prop. But ultimately, in any bugsmasher I flew, a go-around is a go-around. Throttle you're not using to get away from the dirt is kind of a silly thing to keep in your pocket. Are instructors teaching something weird, or is it just new-student-itis?
I agree...it is an odd phrase, but many accidents in this model are in the pattern and involve stalls. I have never flown one, but I have heard that rapid throttle movements take the airplane from a docile flyer to a wicked ride. Not too long ago an Air Force test pilot and B-1 driver was killed in one. He entered the traffic pattern two hundred feet low. But on base he was 12 knots fast. Turning to final at just 200 feet above the ground he pitched up to execute a go around, stalled, and crashed.
 

nittany03

Big hairy American winning machine
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Turning to final at just 200 feet above the ground he pitched up to execute a go around, stalled, and crashed.
Which is why you execute a go-around with the throttle, maintain a centered ball with rudder, and influence the nose to keep either your airspeed or AOA (depending on your instruments) where it needs to be until VSI is positive. Just the phrase "pitched up to execute a go-around" gives me hives, because it conjures up visions of an OMG-Paddles-screaming full slow in close.
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Which is why you execute a go-around with the throttle, maintain a centered ball with rudder, and influence the nose to keep either your airspeed or AOA (depending on your instruments) where it needs to be until VSI is positive. Just the phrase "pitched up to execute a go-around" gives me hives, because it conjures up visions of an OMG-Paddles-screaming full slow in close.
Hell yes.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
General aviation airplanes usually have stronger control forces than a lot of us were used to from learning to fly on the T-34 or the T-6, then when they're out of trim there is even more control force (not that an out of trim T-34 or T-6 is a fingertip flyer...).

I don't remember the "slow flight" maneuver in the T-34 (paging @Gatordev ??) but the one in the T-6 for the last ten years involved really goosing the throttle to demonstrate what your hands and feet needed to do and in an exaggerated way. We'd do it a couple ways, one with maintaining ball, heading, and pitch attitude and the other with letting the airplane do what it wanted to do naturally- which would be quickly pitch up into the stick shaker and buffet, ball out to the side, rolling to the side from the combination of the skidding ball and propeller torque. Occasionally guys would depart controlled flight (which the IP was supposed to prevent... dumbass).

Some guys kinda pooh-poohed this slow flight maneuver because doing all the parts properly was a little tedious. I always thought doing the entire thing was actually a great way to spend five minutes of high work- the student would get practice with fine control of the airplane at high angle of attack or at least learning to not let the airplane make you its bitch; the part with the sudden power change, going from low power to max, that part is particularly good.

Back to general aviation, I think a lot of pattern stalls are because the airplane is out of trim because the pilot didn't re-trim it after adding a lot of power.


@nittany03 , also remember that the propeller wash on the elevators causes a lot of pitch up, much more pitch change than going full mil and/or burner in a jet (other than some jets with the engines in underwing pods, where the thrust line is well below the c.g.).
 
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