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COVID-19

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
Are they being admitted because of COVID or with COVID?
This was pre-Omicron, and they were admitted because of Covid.

The interesting thing was that it was a knock-on effect. The rehab facilities were crammed full of (unvaccinated mostly) Covid patients, so they couldn't discharge the hospitalized patients ready for rehab, so they couldn't move Covid patients upstairs that were wasting ER beds. The whole medical system was constipated with Covid patients.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
The hospitals were not overwhelmed by Covid patients, nor were they being admitted. The hospitals were overwhelmed by people with irrational fears, compounded by the fact that normal providers of health care won't see them. The hospitals were not full of admitted people, they were to the point where they could not fit ER patients anywhere.
There is a data site where all hospitals in the state report COVID admissions and hospitalizations and the 7 day average of hospitalizations for us was 7.2% COVID.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
People being admitted to the hospital don't have mild cases of Covid. What do you think your PCP could do with them?

Last month our local hospital, for the first time in its history, closed the doors to its ER due to be crushed by Covid patients. It's the only hospital in the county, so for that night patients had to enjoy a 45+ minute ride to the next nearest hospital. I'd have been pissed off beyond measure if one of my kids had to be seen and couldn't due to the overflow.
It's more than just 'admitted.' The line of cars waiting in the parking lot + packed waiting room to see an ER doc because people think they might have scaryvirus with such grave symptoms as congestion and low grade fever is a burden on our healthcare system.

And despite yellow journalism reports, anytime I check the CDC's data site the worst-case hospitals are at like 50% capacity for ICU.
 

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
It's more than just 'admitted.' The line of cars waiting in the parking lot + packed waiting room to see an ER doc because people think they might have scaryvirus with such grave symptoms as congestion and low grade fever is a burden on our healthcare system.

And despite yellow journalism reports, anytime I check the CDC's data site the worst-case hospitals are at like 50% capacity for ICU.
Click the link on my story, it wasn't yellow journalism. Hospitals don't shut the doors to their ER for nothing.

Again, this was early December, before omicron. Just good old Delta.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Click the link on my story, it wasn't yellow journalism. Hospitals don't shut the doors to their ER for nothing.

Again, this was early December, before omicron. Just good old Delta.
It looks like that hospital was being kept busy, but too often the info and media slant things by saying "COVID admissions have done up" yes from 5 to 7 is up but when you look at it is only 7% of total admissions, or they talk about how a hospital ICU is nearly full but the hospital 10 miles down the road has a near empty ICU.

The article you posted has actual data to give a decent picture of what they were going through, that is unlike many of the others I have read.

On a side note 2 weeks ago I ended up going to the ER for an issue and while each bed in the ER was full they only had 1 or 2 people waiting to be seen, as they were rotating people out fairly quick. They made a comment that they were busy with lots of injuries due to car accidents, and slip and falls (it had just snowed). The total time I was there was 2.5 hours which included a CAT scan, pretty good experience actually (besides being in pain).
 

Python

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Click the link on my story, it wasn't yellow journalism. Hospitals don't shut the doors to their ER for nothing.

Again, this was early December, before omicron. Just good old Delta.

The yellow journalism refers to the fear mongering that is contrary to the CDC data he mentioned, where the vast majority of hospitals are not close to overwhelmed. It did not refer to your cherry picked, anecdotal, exception that you’re talking about.
 

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
The yellow journalism refers to the fear mongering that is contrary to the CDC data he mentioned, where the vast majority of hospitals are not close to overwhelmed. It did not refer to your cherry picked, anecdotal, exception that you’re talking about.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
This is a bit off from what the numbers reported by the hospitals around me, but not sure of the delay on the link you posted, I will see what my friends wife says about this as she is one of the data people for one of the local hospital systems and has to reported up capacity and covid cases each morning.
 

wink

OLD VS NFO.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Our hospitals operate on a normal business model. It both contains cost and helps ensure efficient distribution of resources. Consequently, hospitals do not have a large percentage of beds and critical equipment. They have just enough to accommodate ordinary business and some surge capacity. That is why you see actual covid percentages less than 20 or 30 percent, but a full hospital. Those covid patents represent the surge capacity a hospital may have never needed before, or only when there was a mass causality event. Essentially covid patients have represented one continuous mass causality event for weeks on end. But their actual demand on a hospital is not critical. If covid admissions push a hospital to 100%, even though covid might amount to just 10% ,staff may work their butts off, but only because of the work load in the aggregate. The press and the government does not explain this even though most of the data is out there. Easy to just say your local hospital is at 98% because, well, covid. What else?

Oh and that line of cars outside an ER is just as likely people waiting to have a sprained ankle get an xray or someone scared over a fever who staff have asked to wait in their cars versus sit in the waiting room. Because covid. And wouldn't you rather wait in your car listening to the game or a pod cast. I consider it innovative. More please.
 

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
Our hospitals operate on a normal business model. It both contains cost and helps ensure efficient distribution of resources. Consequently, hospitals do not have a large percentage of beds and critical equipment. They have just enough to accommodate ordinary business and some surge capacity.
I can’t argue with this. And no question their criteria for admission flexes with beds to fill. But…
That is why you see actual covid percentages less than 20 or 30 percent, but a full hospital.
Covid patients place a much heavier burden due to all the PPE and patient isolation requirements and other stuff. They’re running a hospital in a hospital. That why a key metric is the percentage that are Covid patients.
 

ABMD

Bullets don't fly without Supply
What I find interesting is that some hospitals are requiring COVID POSITIVE employees to return to work. As long as it has been 5-day since the start of symptoms, you can return to work, doesn't matter if you are still coughing or sneezing. I understand this may season reasonable if the hospital is completely overrun, but this is my wife's hospital which isn't in a state of emergency and she doesn't work a normal floor or see COV patients.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
More facts and figures from the horse's uhhhh mouth. On average four additional conditions causing death. It doesn't say if they were pre-existing or if people caught a bug after coming down with the 'rona (which seems to me is a critical piece of information).

(Gotta scroll about halfway down on the link for the part I put in my screenshot.)

comorbidities.jpg


 
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