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Consolidated Advice for Primary

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
If there's a standard brief that everyone gives, why can't you just say "standard brief?"

Yes, my question is only 25% serious, so don't @ me, bro.

We don't have the gas, especially at the lower altitude forms are done at, to really screw around with an unprepared student. Most of the forms are scheduled as an out and in, which helps a bit, but also means the studs don't both get to lead and wing in on course rules/the break very often.
Gotcha, and makes sense.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
This was the Corpus forms brief typed out in a Word doc. Recited verbatim each brief:
Some of the items are pretty non-standard for most of the form flying we do in our community, but that document seems to be a fairly reasonable starting point for basic form flying.
 

SynixMan

Space Cadet
pilot
Contributor
@Gatordev To directly answer your question, there's just a lot of new (to the SNA) information to cover on the first brief for F4101. There's no way in TIMS to pad extra brief time for those flights, and it will be readily apparent if the SNAs have practiced the brief before that day. F4101's NATOPS also covers most of the basic profile stuff. There's no silly lost comms hand dance like in HTs, but they've likely spent their entire (short) flying career doing the same basic brief and profile, and only as a single. They need to have the profile, comms, and dual briefing stuff down coming into the brief, since the actual event will be spent desperately trying to figure out the flying mechanics as -2.
 

RoarkJr.

Well-Known Member
This includes whether or not your squadron does the NATOPS Brief.
How would it be possible for a squadron to not do the NATOPS brief? Isn’t the NATOPS brief a list of things that must be briefed prior to flight per NATOPS, and therefore required to do by everyone flying a T-6B?
 

Hammer10k

Well-Known Member
pilot
How would it be possible for a squadron to not do the NATOPS brief? Isn’t the NATOPS brief a list of things that must be briefed prior to flight per NATOPS, and therefore required to do by everyone flying a T-6B?
VT-27 made the student do the NATOPS brief from memory so it was 2 pages of rote memorization covering things like inadvertent IMC or ejections. The Milton squadrons had the IP brief the students.
 

Ozarky

Well-Known Member
pilot
VT-27 made the student do the NATOPS brief from memory so it was 2 pages of rote memorization covering things like inadvertent IMC or ejections. The Milton squadrons had the IP brief the students.
When I went through VT-27 last year it was like 12 pages of verbatim briefing that we had to spit out prior to actually kicking off the discussion items. Basically ended up being a giant monologue that you would have to memorize by the time you got to offwing flights. Honestly seemed like brain hazing more than anything lol
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
Who gives the NATOPS brief, IP or student, is one of those things that goes back and forth every few years and varies from squadron to squadron. If you're in a crew aircraft in your fleet squadron then sometimes the aircraft commander will give the brief (this is the most proper way) but sometimes delegate it to one of the crew, for some reason or another.

In the training command, if the student gives it then it takes longer, there are little mistakes to correct, and sometimes the individual squadron might have stuffed a few too many things into the brief (making it not brief at all...). If the IP gives it then that should mean fewer mistakes and faster, but then sometimes the student doesn't learn the details as well. One of my primary IPs gave most of the brief, but at different parts he had me pick it up (for example, "engine failure we will ___" gestures to me to recite immediate action items, then he picks it back up again). You wouldn't see that much or at all in a fleet squadron, but in the training command it can be a useful tool to keep a good pace and keep both people's brains engaged in the brief. In the fleet, the entire brief can be divided up between more than one person is it pertains to each role. If your platform has a mission commander in the back and a pilot in command up front then that's one example, SAR crewmen is another.

Sometimes you're in primary squadron brand X doing things one way and your friends are in brand Y are doing things a slightly different way. That's kinda how a lot of things go in a lot of places in aviation.
 

RandomGoat1248

Well-Known Member
Whats the current state of EFB/Foreflight Military Flight Bag use in CNATRA?
In VT-J and multi-engine it can be used from day one. I believe that is the case in helos as well but am not sure.

For the majority it still isn't allowed in Primary, but I've heard that is going to change soon.
 

scoolbubba

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Yep, studs will probably be issued iPads in the near future if they haven't already (I dunno what the avenger nerds are doing when they aren't plugged into the matrix).

I'd argue moving map ought to be an admin privilege controlled by the IP, but I'm probably just getting cantankerous in my old age.
 

RandomGoat1248

Well-Known Member
Yep, studs will probably be issued iPads in the near future if they haven't already (I dunno what the avenger nerds are doing when they aren't plugged into the matrix).

I'd argue moving map ought to be an admin privilege controlled by the IP, but I'm probably just getting cantankerous in my old age.
Current SOP in VT-J is studs can’t use GPS on the iPad until after the IR check.

Multi-engine was unrestricted as far as I remember.
 
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