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Concerned About GPA Hinderance

ENGR3000

New Member
Hello all,

I'm currently a student of Mechanical Engineering with aspirations of becoming a Naval Aviator once college is over. I'm seeking to compete for a Navy OCS flight contract, but there's a problem. I got back my midterm grades from my first semester at my four-year university, and they are the worst grades I've ever received in college. To my knowledge I'm not failing anything, but I don't even know if I'll break a 3.0 GPA this semester. It may even be a 2.4 or somewhere within that range. Just to give you an idea of where I came from prior to my four-year university, I transferred from a community college with an associate's degree in math & science, throughout which I had a 3.6 cumulative GPA. This would've been a stellar GPA to have this semester, but I'm doubtful I will be able to keep it. It's not like I was taking easy classes at my community college either. All calculus, differential equations, all the engineering physics and chemistry required for mechanical engineering. Even took some engineering electives.

Needless to say, I'm getting very concerned about my aspirations to become a naval aviator as I understand flight contracts are extremely competitive, and I'm worried my engineering GPA will make this a problem. Should I transfer from engineering to something maybe a little easier, like Marine Environmental Science? I want the possibility of becoming a test pilot someday, assuming I did well in my assigned platform if I graduate from pilot training, and I understand the requirements for getting into Naval Test Pilot School are a 3.0 GPA or greater in a math, science or engineering field (and obviously having a very good feel for the aircraft). I called up a Naval Officer Recruiter several months ago who basically told me to call him back a year from now since I still have 2 and a half years before I plan to have my bachelor's degree. To those of you with flight experience, what do you suggest and why?
 

ManWitQuestions

New Member
I'm in a similar situation to you. I'll leave the Navy specific advice to other people with more experience. But I will say that if you are concerned about your GPA and decide to stay with engineering, find some of the fun and easy classes that your school offers and add them into your course work. It will provide a break from the more challenging classes and give you an easy A to help boost your GPA. Also aim to have enough credit hours each semester to be able to drop a class if things are really not looking good for you. Also go to office hours, professors/TA's grade you more easily if they know that you are trying.
 

rockthearts281

meh, worst case scenario, we die.
Hello all,

I'm currently a student of Mechanical Engineering with aspirations of becoming a Naval Aviator once college is over. I'm seeking to compete for a Navy OCS flight contract, but there's a problem. I got back my midterm grades from my first semester at my four-year university, and they are the worst grades I've ever received in college. To my knowledge I'm not failing anything, but I don't even know if I'll break a 3.0 GPA this semester. It may even be a 2.4 or somewhere within that range. Just to give you an idea of where I came from prior to my four-year university, I transferred from a community college with an associate's degree in math & science, throughout which I had a 3.6 cumulative GPA. This would've been a stellar GPA to have this semester, but I'm doubtful I will be able to keep it. It's not like I was taking easy classes at my community college either. All calculus, differential equations, all the engineering physics and chemistry required for mechanical engineering. Even took some engineering electives.
If you are that concerned about your GPA, transfer to an easier major. I am about to graduate with a BA degree in female dance therapy (sarcasm) but my cum GPA was high enough coupled with my test scores to get me a PROREC-Y for SNA. With that being said if you hunt around you can probably find someone who got picked up with a sub 3.0 GPA.

I want the possibility of becoming a test pilot someday, assuming I did well in my assigned platform if I graduate from pilot training, and I understand the requirements for getting into Naval Test Pilot School are a 3.0 GPA or greater in a math, science or engineering field (and obviously having a very good feel for the aircraft).
Worry about the closest gator to you. No point in wasting brain power worrying about a hypothetical thats 6 years+ down the road.
 

gogged

Member
FYI retaking classes doesn't help much with the Navy. For most (all?) schools, if you retake a course they take the higher grade. I had to resubmit my transcripts with one that showed original grades since the Navy takes those into account too. So retaking and getting a higher grade still helps, but the original lower grade is still there.
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
FYI retaking classes doesn't help much with the Navy. For most (all?) schools, if you retake a course they take the higher grade. I had to resubmit my transcripts with one that showed original grades since the Navy takes those into account too. So retaking and getting a higher grade still helps, but the original lower grade is still there.
All they care is the major and GPA. Not specific courses.
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
FYI retaking classes doesn't help much with the Navy. For most (all?) schools, if you retake a course they take the higher grade. I had to resubmit my transcripts with one that showed original grades since the Navy takes those into account too. So retaking and getting a higher grade still helps, but the original lower grade is still there.
It really depends on the school, I dealt with schools that when a retake was completed it kept the original grade and factored it into the GPA, ones that kept the original grade visible but did not factor it into GPA, ones that upon retake removed the old grade and replaced it with a code to indicate retake and it was no longer factored into the GPA either only the newest grade is.

So depending on what school you attend you may or may not get a good deal when doing a retake.
 

Pianistwithwings

Cat Herder
None
FYI retaking classes doesn't help much with the Navy. For most (all?) schools, if you retake a course they take the higher grade. I had to resubmit my transcripts with one that showed original grades since the Navy takes those into account too. So retaking and getting a higher grade still helps, but the original lower grade is still there.
C's get degrees. You set out to get [STEM
degree] because it has some application to being a Naval Aviator, remembering that may help you when studying, and you will have more education options later on than having a degree in basket weaving like this guy.
 
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colonial-aviation

Well-Known Member
I'm curious, do any of our resident recruiters know of an applicant getting a PROREC-Y before graduating and then not getting a FINSEL after he submitted his final transcripts? I imagine that would only happen if said applicant's GPA fell below the minimum qualifying or there were legal troubles.
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
I'm curious, do any of our resident recruiters know of an applicant getting a PROREC-Y before graduating and then not getting a FINSEL after he submitted his final transcripts? I imagine that would only happen if said applicant's GPA fell below the minimum qualifying or there were legal troubles.
You can’t get a final select until your final grades and degree conferred info arrive. Because technically without a degree you aren’t eligible to be an officer.
 

colonial-aviation

Well-Known Member
You can’t get a final select until your final grades and degree conferred info arrive. Because technically without a degree you aren’t eligible to be an officer.
Yeah, but what I'm asking is if you've ever had someone who got a PROREC-Y, then graduated and sent final grades and degree in, but didn't get a FINSEL. Which is to say was denied a FINSEL upon sending grades and diploma in.
 
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