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The Silent Service gallery

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
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I have seen this happen on carriers before, if it was that bad for us I hate to think what it would have been like for a sub on the surface
Those 7 degree rolls are a bitch...

Two stories told to me by my dad who served on Diesel Fleet boats (SS-42x):

-While operating in some rough water on the surface/snorkeling, one young khaki-wearing go-getter was just not operating at a useful level. He was puking to the point where the doc put him under. After some time, the boat dived down to depth and things smoothed out. By this time, our hero awoke and worked his way back to his watch station. Someone (I'm convinced this was a Chief, but not certain) took him up to the control panel that showed the boat's status. An order was given to adjust depth, so the dive bubble moved from level to a disoriented-induced position (it moved a little bit to show dive angle). The aforementioned khaki immediately came down with a violent reaction to his perceived surroundings.

-Diesel boats, by definition, need to run their diesels. Part of doing that is snorkeling. A somewhat common occurrence was operating at snorkeling depth in rough seas. As the boat would work through the seas, the OOD or Dive Officer (sorry, I'm don't remember which) was responsible for not running the boat too deep so that the snorkel went under water. Again, as the boat would run through the seas, this would become a challenge to the point where the sub may run "too" deep, triggering the exhaust valve for the diesels to shut as the water ran over the exhaust. This would IMMEDIATELY cause a pressure change w/in the hull, causing a reaction by the bridge team to counter the issue. Sometimes the reaction was too "energetic," and the sub would over-compensate, causing it to rise up to an "airborne" state, only to come crashing back down again, called broaching the boat. When the offending watch officer was "convicted" of such an act, he got to wear a LARGE set of wings on his patrol uniform. These were not sought after.

I don't wish to be on such a vessel, but some of the stories my dad told me certainly made me appreciate the Old School Navy, be it sub, surface, or air.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Those 7 degree rolls are a bitch...
yes they are :), they weren't as bad as the PPWO continuing to say "Steam Generator LLA in and clear due to ships roll"

I have seen seas bad enough where you could stand at the back of the hangar bay and look forward to see the ship twist, incredible sight. The thing is as little as a carrier does roll I have seen some interesting damage due to heavy seas, damaged sponsons, CIWS damaged, liferafts ripped off, and other missing items.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
I always liked rough seas from the times my dad took me ocean fishing as a kid. Never got sea sick.

I think it's a rite of passage that every sub OOD gets drenched on the bridge in bad weather. It's a bit scary when you think the boat may have temporarily submerged, as has happened on occasion.
 

BusyBee604

St. Francis/Hugh Hefner Combo!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
-Diesel boats, by definition, need to run their diesels. Part of doing that is snorkeling. A somewhat common occurrence was operating at snorkeling depth in rough seas. As the boat would work through the seas, the OOD or Diving Officer (sorry, I'm don't remember which) was responsible for not running the boat too deep so that the snorkel went under water. Again, as the boat would run through the seas, this would become a challenge to the point where the sub may run "too" deep, triggering the Main Induction (air intake) valve for the diesels to shut as the water ran over the intake valve sensors.
FIFY.... Great story, brought back the long ago first experience of snorkeling in rough seas. At first, it's quite uncomfortable. If you snorkel for an extended time, the intake will cycle closing... then opening as each wave/swell flows over the valve, so that water isn't ingested into the diesel(s) intake manifold while running. While the valve is closed, pressure inside the boat slowly decreases, causing discomfort in the ears, much like climbing to/descending from high altitudes in an aircraft (also bad news with a head cold/stopped up ears). After a while, the cycling becomes second nature and is barely noticed.
This would IMMEDIATELY cause a pressure change w/in the hull....
The pressure drop when the air intake closes is caused by the diesel engines which continue running by switching to drawing (sucking air) from inside the boat. At a predetermined pressure ~26-27"hg, the diesel(s) shut down automatically. To become a good qualified Diving Officer required learning the slight depth/trim adjustments to preclude engine shutdowns, without broaching (kinda like using control surfaces and trim to maintain altitude in aircraft). Ah, I remember it well!:)
BzB
 

Gatordev

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pilot
Site Admin
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Thanks for the corrections, BzB. It's been a while since I've heard him tell the story. I'm embarrassed that I got exhaust and intake confused.
 
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