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The Doctor is in! Ask a Flight Surgeon!

Jersey96

New Member
Not sure about the board process and all the formalities, but in primary I was never airsick except for passive airsickness in spins. In T-45s, I never got airsick until TACFORM stage, where I puked through every flight. I was very nervous about this when BFM would start, but to my surprise I didn't even get passively airsick. I had no issues with airsickness in the FRS or fleet from then on (also, T-45 TACFORM is not how it's done in gray airplanes). I seriously thought I was done with this community during TACFORM. Everybody is different, but it is possible you will get over it. Don't quit until you truly are unable to continue no matter what.
That is refreshing to hear, that is very similar to my situation. It started with TACFORM and it’s just made me nervous if it would continue to hinder my performance in later stages. So it sounds like I just need to continue trying to power through and hopefully my body will adjust as time goes on. Thank you for the reply!
 

Hopeful Hoya

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Yeah dude, I wouldn’t worry too much about it, VT TACFORM sucks. Even a BFM IP or two has been known to get queasy during those flights, especially if their stud really likes making accute corrections ;)
 

Pakol

Learner's permit
pilot
Does anyone knows what happens if you can’t get over airsickness in the T-45? I am currently a student there and am struggling with some airsickness with the phase 2 flights. I got passively airsick a few times in primary and the beginning of intermediate but never too bad, but these last few flight in the T-45 I have been actively airsick every time. I saw the flight doc and he recommended I try some vitamin b6, in addition to the ginger I have already been taking to see if that helps. I just feel like everyone always says you get over it but it just doesn’t seem to be getting better for me and I just feel like I am at a loss at what to do. I looked up the CNATRA instruction and it mentions that after two active airsickness episodes you need to go to a airsickness review board with the CO, so I am curious as to what the outcomes of that board would be?
Thank you for the help.
Dude, trying chewing mint gum from walk to shutdown. That was the suggestion from the MATSG CO, and it got me through trunking HABFM flights without a second of queasiness.
 

bigfoot20

New Member
What about a single episode of atrial fibrillation? I had one instance that was caused by dehydration/low magnesium (I work outside in the heat). I was on medication for a month, but was taken off by my cardiologist. I searched on here, and I read people implicitly saying not to mention it. I am wondering if NAMI would look at my FAA flight physical
 

papacarter

College Student
This may seem like a stupid question, but it has been a while since I got my teeth cleaned. How do I go about this with now that I'm in the Navy?
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
This may seem like a stupid question, but it has been a while since I got my teeth cleaned. How do I go about this with now that I'm in the Navy?
Call your local dental office - schedule a cleaning. Normally you need an up to date dental exam w/i 1 year for your annual flight physical, so I usually line those things up for convenience.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
This may seem like a stupid question, but it has been a while since I got my teeth cleaned. How do I go about this with now that I'm in the Navy?
Have you gone to OCS? If so then they should be contacting you and if not like Brett said you contact them.

If you have not gone to OCS and do not hold and ID card then you just do like you would normally do to get your teeth cleaned.
 

Zballin95

New Member
Good Evening All,

I’m an Air traffic controller Trying to see if I can get some help. In Oct 2015 I experienced a Mild tbi it was classed as both mild and moderate in my military records. I did all required works up for a moderate tbi saw 2 neurologists both said no issues and recommended a waiver. I’m attaching a picture from the nami aeromedical reference and waiver guide to see if I still need to get a waiver. It says 12 months after injury I would be consider for a waiver and also mentions would be considered 3 years post injury does that mean 3 years passed and if the flight doc says I’m good no need for waiver?27629
 

zucc3636

New Member
Hi all, I asked this question in a separate thread and was referred here to Doc's Corner. I'm hoping someone knowledgeable could answer this for me. I am currently a senior in college on track to graduate May 2021 and I'm very interested in applying to OCS as a SNA. However, when I was younger I got migraines with aura. I have not had one in a few years, and when I was still getting them the severity and duration both had been decreasing significantly. I believe I would meet the requirements for a waiver, except for the fact that my migraines included aura. I was prescribed medication several years ago and this is in my medical record, but I have not taken the prescription since it was originally prescribed. On the aeromedical guide, it states that migraine with aura is CD with no waivers considered, but I have read on the forum instances where people have been able to obtain a waiver for migraine with aura. I wonder if anyone has any insight as to whether I would have a chance of making it as a naval aviator given this circumstance, or if there would be no reason for them to even consider me since I am not already flying. This would be a dream job for me, so I do not want to leave any stone unturned. Any tips/ info/ advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Hi all, I asked this question in a separate thread and was referred here to Doc's Corner. I'm hoping someone knowledgeable could answer this for me. I am currently a senior in college on track to graduate May 2021 and I'm very interested in applying to OCS as a SNA. However, when I was younger I got migraines with aura. I have not had one in a few years, and when I was still getting them the severity and duration both had been decreasing significantly. I believe I would meet the requirements for a waiver, except for the fact that my migraines included aura. I was prescribed medication several years ago and this is in my medical record, but I have not taken the prescription since it was originally prescribed. On the aeromedical guide, it states that migraine with aura is CD with no waivers considered, but I have read on the forum instances where people have been able to obtain a waiver for migraine with aura. I wonder if anyone has any insight as to whether I would have a chance of making it as a naval aviator given this circumstance, or if there would be no reason for them to even consider me since I am not already flying. This would be a dream job for me, so I do not want to leave any stone unturned. Any tips/ info/ advice would be greatly appreciated!
The only way to know for sure is to start the process with an OR and see what navy medical says.
 

rymo96

Member
Are hairpieces allowed in aviation for those with male-pattern baldness? The navy allows them if they are not a safety or FOD hazard.

Considering the hairpiece would be normal/human hair and the base is attached to the scalp with medical grade bonding glue or tape that are nonflammable and can last up to a few months before needing to be replaced, and worn under helmet and possible a skull cap too, is a hairpiece really much a safety or FOD hazard? Anyone have knowledge or insight on this?
 

FinkUFreaky

Well-Known Member
pilot
Are hairpieces allowed in aviation for those with male-pattern baldness? The navy allows them if they are not a safety or FOD hazard.

Considering the hairpiece would be normal/human hair and the base is attached to the scalp with medical grade bonding glue or tape that are nonflammable and can last up to a few months before needing to be replaced, and worn under helmet and possible a skull cap too, is a hairpiece really much a safety or FOD hazard? Anyone have knowledge or insight on this?
Don't know any official answers, but my gut says be ready to rock the bald look. It's not so bad, there are plenty of other bald pilots and FOs.... While I'm out now, I'm very likely to try it out soon as the top hair has been getting thinner and thinner.

Wearing a hair-piece is likely to get you a callsign like "Bosley". All that said, I'm not sure how it could be considered a FOD hazard... But I wouldn't be surprised if it could be. Also realize when you deploy for nine months on a carrier, getting a trip stateside to get a replacement glued on isn't very likely (as in, it won't happen). If your sig is correct, and you've already been through NIFE, a flight doc or your class advisor would be the best resources.

Edit: At the risk of looking stupid I left my above post untouched. That said, nice work looking up the instruction, and obviously by posting here you actually are asking a flight doc's opinion, so above on headwork on those two points.
 

rymo96

Member
Don't know any official answers, but my gut says be ready to rock the bald look. It's not so bad, there are plenty of other bald pilots and FOs.... While I'm out now, I'm very likely to try it out soon as the top hair has been getting thinner and thinner.

Wearing a hair-piece is likely to get you a callsign like "Bosley". All that said, I'm not sure how it could be considered a FOD hazard... But I wouldn't be surprised if it could be. Also realize when you deploy for nine months on a carrier, getting a trip stateside to get a replacement glued on isn't very likely (as in, it won't happen). If your sig is correct, and you've already been through NIFE, a flight doc or your class advisor would be the best resources.

Edit: At the risk of looking stupid I left my above post untouched. That said, nice work looking up the instruction, and obviously by posting here you actually are asking a flight doc's opinion, so above on headwork on those two points.
Thank you for your response. I am sure there are worse callsigns out there 😅.

I figured that while I am young and still have most of my hair on the top of my head and having the means to do something about balding, then why not be proactive and try and do something about it? Good point on the deployment aspect. Fortunately, the glue can be replaced on your own and anywhere.

In the CNATRA FOD Policy, a Foreign Object is defined as "substances or articles alien to the aircraft, engine, support equipment or component that are left adrift or are otherwise allowed to invade the product." It also defines "Aircrew Induced FOD" as items "...left by aircrew in, on, or around an aircraft..." Since a hairpiece would be physically attached to your scalp and under other flight equipment such as a helmet and possibly a skull cap too, and not left behind in/on/around and aircraft, and in all other respects acting as a normal set of hair, I am not sure how it would be considered a FOD hazard. But that is why I am asking around.

I cannot find navy aviation specific policies regarding hairpieces or on the NAMI waiver guide (if a waiver is needed for it), unless I glossed over it and missed it. I did not think hairpieces would be on the waiver guide anyway since a hairpiece would be cosmetic and non-surgical/non-medical procedure. The only thing I found in the waiver guide that come close is that it states there are certain medications that cannot be prescribed solely to stop hair loss, wheres they could be prescribed for reasons.

My goal of asking here was to seek out insight or others' experiences or knowledge and have as much information as possible before approaching a flight doc at the training wing.
 

FinkUFreaky

Well-Known Member
pilot
Thank you for your response. I am sure there are worse callsigns out there 😅.

I figured that while I am young and still have most of my hair on the top of my head and having the means to do something about balding, then why not be proactive and try and do something about it? Good point on the deployment aspect. Fortunately, the glue can be replaced on your own and anywhere.

In the CNATRA FOD Policy, a Foreign Object is defined as "substances or articles alien to the aircraft, engine, support equipment or component that are left adrift or are otherwise allowed to invade the product." It also defines "Aircrew Induced FOD" as items "...left by aircrew in, on, or around an aircraft..." Since a hairpiece would be physically attached to your scalp and under other flight equipment such as a helmet and possibly a skull cap too, and not left behind in/on/around and aircraft, and in all other respects acting as a normal set of hair, I am not sure how it would be considered a FOD hazard. But that is why I am asking around.

I cannot find navy aviation specific policies regarding hairpieces or on the NAMI waiver guide (if a waiver is needed for it), unless I glossed over it and missed it. I did not think hairpieces would be on the waiver guide anyway since a hairpiece would be cosmetic and non-surgical/non-medical procedure. The only thing I found in the waiver guide that come close is that it states there are certain medications that cannot be prescribed solely to stop hair loss, wheres they could be prescribed for reasons.

My goal of asking here was to seek out insight or others' experiences or knowledge and have as much information as possible before approaching a flight doc at the training wing.
Completely understand, and again, good on you for looking up instructions (I didn't understand their importance until most of the way through my first sea tour; probably something that could and yet maybe should not be fixed about flight school :) ). It also took me some time to understand that leaving my water bottle (or dip spit bottle) in the designated cup-holder in the E-2 was somehow FOD.

Honestly, nobody but you will know that you are wearing a hairpiece. I don't think they are covered in CNAF3710. I doubt there is any waiver required. I will say that depending on platform, sweating in the helmet may degrade the normal lifetime of them. You'll think about helmet sweat the first time you have to borrow someone else's because yours is due for inspection, or when someone has to borrow yours and you have to wear it afterwards. About as bad as having to borrow a 3-5 year used oxygen mask..... Or worse
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
Good luck when your ready room discovers you wear a hair piece....and they will....
 
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