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Ship Photo of the Day

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
HMS Vanguard Pennant #23. The biggest and fastest battleship of the Royal Navy, she was the last battleship launched in the world. Some changes from previous British battleship design include greatly reduced conning tower protection, substantially increased torpedo protection (lessons learned from the sinking of the Prince of Wales) and a flared bow design that allowed very high speed in rough seas - some reports state that is was faster than the Iowa class in bad seas.

Length: 814' Beam: 108', Displacement: 51,420 tons at full load
130,000 HP gave 30+ knots
Main Armament: 8 (4x2) 15" Mark I rifles, 16 (8x2) 5.25 secondaries, 73 Bofors 40mm to include 10 sextuple mounts
Armor: Belt: 14", Turrets: 13", Deck: Up to 6"
Launched: 30 Nov 1944, Commissioned: 12 May 1946, Decommissioned: 7 June 1960


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Vanguard during NATO Operation Mainbrace, 1952

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Vanguard in Rotterdam, June 1952
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
The Royal Navy's equivalent to the Midway class were the Malta class of 4 large carriers that were unfortunately never built. (HMS New Zealand, HMS Gibraltar, HMS Africa and HMS Malta were the names.) Interesting that back then, as now with the new Queen Elizabeth class, there are 2 islands.

Length: 897 ft, Beam: 115 ft, Displacement: 57,700 tons
200,000 HP gave 33+ knots
80-108 aircraft

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malta-class_aircraft_carrier


21745
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Flagship of the British Fleet at Jutland and lead ship of a class of 4, HMS Iron Duke (ironic that the British flagship for the greatest sea battle of WW1 was named after the British commander at Waterloo.) After Jutland and Jellicoe's replacement by Beatty, some reports had that the crew disliked the new admiral of the Grand Fleet so much that Beatty moved his flag to the HMS Queen Elizabeth. It was also the first British battleship to have anti-aircraft weapons (3") , in this case due to German airships.

Length: 623 ft, Beam: 90 ft, Displacement: 29,500 tons at full load
29,000 HP gave 21 knots.
Main Armament: 10 (5x2) 13.5"/45 caliber Mark V rifles firing 1,400 lbs shells out to 23,800 yards,
Secondaries: 12 (12x1) 6"/45 caliber, numerous smaller guns, 4 x 21" torpedo tubes
Armor: Belt: 12", Turret: 11", Deck: 2.5" (after Jutland, another 820 tons of armor were added)
Commissioned: March 1914, Decommissioned and scrapped: March 1946
Ships of the Iron Duke class: (Iron Duke, Marlborough, Benbow, Emperor of India)

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Iron Duke in November 1913

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Iron Duke underway

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Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
At last week's naval review, China showed off its new Type 55 Destroyer. At 13,000 tons full load, cruiser might be a more apt description... According to wikipedia, The first of class, Nanchang, made its public debut during the PLAN's 70th anniversary parade[21] on 23 April 2019.[3] The ship was not yet commissioned.

Length: 590 ft, Beam: 66 ft, Displacement: 13,000 tons estimate at full load
4 gas turbines pushing 150,000 HP gives 30+ knots
Armament: 112 VLS for missiles, 1 x 130mm cannon, CIWS, 2 helicopters

Couple of articles on it.
Five things to know about China’s home-built Type 055 destroyer, guardian of the next-generation aircraft carrier
China has launched four Type 055 guided-missile destroyers in the past 13 months and is building four more to meet its need for advanced warships
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2158059/five-things-know-about-home-built-destroyer-will-guard

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-army-navy-specialreport/special-report-chinas-vast-fleet-is-tipping-the-balance-in-the-pacific-idUSKCN1S612W

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Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Perhaps the longest lasting World War I super-dreadnought, Almirante Latorre of the Chilean Navy. Ordered from England in 1911 during the South American dreadnought race https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_American_dreadnought_race between Chile, Argentina and Brazil, it was kept by the British Navy to fight in World War 1 as HMS Canada, seeing action at the Battle of Jutland. Chile repurchased the ship in 1920 where it served as the flagship of the Chilean Navy. After Pearl Harbor, the United States inquired about purchasing the ship but Chile refused. It remained in service all the way to 1958.

Length: 625 ft, Beam: 93 ft, Displacement: 32,000 tons at full load
37,000 HP gave 22+ knots
Main Armament: 10 (5x2) 14"/45 caliber cannons firing 1,580 lb shells
Secondaries: 16x6" cannons, various anti-aircraft weapons
Commissioned: 15 Oct 1915, Decommissioned: October 1958

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Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
Perhaps the longest lasting World War I super-dreadnought, Almirante Latorre of the Chilean Navy. Ordered from England in 1911 during the South American dreadnought race https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_American_dreadnought_race between Chile, Argentina and Brazil, it was kept by the British Navy to fight in World War 1 as HMS Canada, seeing action at the Battle of Jutland. Chile repurchased the ship in 1920 where it served as the flagship of the Chilean Navy. After Pearl Harbor, the United States inquired about purchasing the ship but Chile refused. It remained in service all the way to 1958.

Length: 625 ft, Beam: 93 ft, Displacement: 32,000 tons at full load
37,000 HP gave 22+ knots
Main Armament: 10 (5x2) 14"/45 caliber cannons firing 1,580 lb shells
Secondaries: 16x6" cannons, various anti-aircraft weapons
Commissioned: 15 Oct 1915, Decommissioned: October 1958

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The most fascinating thing about that design is the absolute lack of torpedo armor. Goes to prove you can only look so far into the future.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
The most fascinating thing about that design is the absolute lack of torpedo armor. Goes to prove you can only look so far into the future.
A few good photos of the USS West Virginia (BB-48) showing her original exterior armor belt and then the torpedo bulges for protection added after Pearl Harbor.

21982
In drydock at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, 10 June 1942, for repair of damage suffered in the 7 December 1941 Japanese air raid. She had entered the drydock on the previous day. Note large patch on her hull amidships, fouling on her hull, and large armor belt.

21983
Bow view of the West Virginia (BB-48) in drydock.
Although it is not polite to call attention to a ladies' added weight, please note her bulges added for torpedo protection.

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Bow view of the West Virginia (BB-48) in drydock at Puget Sound.

And just a few more photos of the USS West Virginia.

21985

US Navy battleships in parade formation in San Diego, California, 23 August 1935.
Pennsylvania (BB-38) in the lead followed by West Virginia (BB-48), Colorado (BB-45), Maryland (BB-46), California (BB-44) and Texas(BB-35). After the Texas, the photo is just too "fuzzy" for an ID.

21986
New York (BB-34) ahead of Pennsylvania (BB-38). The next ship ahead is a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) based on the slope of the turret roofs. (Uniform slope back to front - no kink like the twin 16" mounts on the Colorado's (BB-45). Based on the relatively full appearance of the forward superstructure, I am leaning toward California (BB-44) which had an enlarged flag bridge as Battle Force Flagship. The other three are obviously Tennessee (BB-43) and/or Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) but are too indistinct to ID specifically. Because of the boom cranes on the sterns, the photo was taken between 1931 and 1934.

21987
Probable front and rear photos here and below showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, 1938 / 1939.
Pictured here is the New Mexico (BB-40) in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
The lead BB looks like Mississippi (BB-41) followed by Maryland (BB-46) (rangefinder on Turret II). My first impression of the Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) is the Tennessee (BB-43), but that is not a certain ID from this photo alone. Fourth is the Oklahoma (BB-37) (no birdbath). Aside from the DD now in the lead, I see nothing in the head-on shot aerial that positively differs from the ID's of the first 4 BB's in the first photo. Of course, in the aft aerial shot, BB #5 is the California (BB-44), ID'd by the enlarged flag bridge, lending support to BB #3 in the first photo being Tennessee.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
First thought: It's incredible to think that the major powers entered WWII with biplanes in the inventory and left it six years later with jets.

Second thought: Ed Heinemann helped design the SBD, which was a derivative of the BT. And later designed the F4D and A-4. And just before he retired, he was VP of Engineering at General Dynamics. So he didn't design the F-16, but the people who did worked for him.

I can't imagine being around for that level of fundamental technological change in a career.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Probably the worst submarine class ever built, the British "K" class submarines of WWI. Although capable of 24 knots on the surface, they were limited to a 200 ft dive - when your sub is 339 ft long and dive controls were still in their infancy, that could be a problem. Almost forgot - the K class was powered by oil fired boilers and normally took at least 5 minutes to dive. 18 were built, 6 were lost in accidents.

Length: 339 ft, Beam: 27 ft, Displacement: 1,980 tons on the surface, 2,566 submerged
Twin oil fired boilers produced 21,000 HP and gave 24 knots on the surface, Four 1,440 electric motors gave 8 knots submerged
Armament: 4 beam mounted 18" torpedo tubes, 4 bow mounted 18" torpedo tubes, two 4" cannons, one 3" cannon
In service: 1917-1931

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Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Probably the worst submarine class ever built, the British "K" class submarines of WWI.
You haven't heard about the Italian submarines based in the Red Sea during WWII, they used methyl chloride in their air conditioning systems and often poisoned their crews. I would take really slow submerging sub over one that poisons you.
 
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You haven't heard about the Italian submarines based in the Red Sea during WWII, they used methyl chloride in their air conditioning systems and often poisoned their crews. I would take really slow submerging sub over one that poisons you.
You can’t use that as a benchmark—SWOs have been getting slowly poisoned since the dawn of time.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Watching the 1965 film "In Harm's Way" (John Wayne's last black and white film). In the film, Captain Torrey (John Wayne) has command of a heavy cruiser at Pearl Harbor. The ship used for these scenes was the USS Saint Paul (CA-73), a Baltimore class heavy cruiser. Unlike some other cruisers which were later outfitted with missiles, the Saint Paul kept her all gun armament to the end.

The Saint Paul was commissioned in 1945, joining the fleet off Japan in July 1945. She also served in Korea and Vietnam.

Length: 673 ft, Beam: 71 ft, Displacement: 14,500 tons
4 boilers pushed 120,000 HP through 4 screws for 32+ knots
Main armament: 9 (3x3) 8"/55 cal cannons firing 335 lb shells out to 30,000 yards.
Secondaries: 12 (6x2) 5"/38 cal dual purpose, 48 (12x4) 40mm Bofors, 22 20mm Oerlikons
Armor: Belt: 4"-6", Deck: 2.5"
Commissioned: 17 Feb 1945, Decommissioned: 30 Apr 1971, Struck: 31 Jul 1978

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The U.S. Navy heavy cruiser USS Saint Paul (CA-73) underway in Massachusetts Bay, 15 March 1945

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Saint Paul fires her 8-inch 55-caliber (203-mm) guns at Chinese troops threatening the evacuation of United Nations forces from Hungnam, North Korea, in December 1950

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Three gun salvo from Turret Three of the USS Saint Paul while bombarding at Inchon, Korea, circa 21-31 January 1951. Note the projectles in flight in the upper left of the photo.

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The destroyer USS Buck (DD-761), battleship USS Wisconsin (BB-64), and Saint Paul steam in close formation during operations off the Korean coast in 1952.

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USS Saint Paul (CA 73) near Wonsan, Korea, on 27 July 1953, just before signing of the truce at Panmunjon. A 12.7 cm (5 in) shell is fired from ship against North Korean shore batteries. This round is believed to have been the last fired on enemy positions by UN Naval units before the armistice.


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On station in Vietnam (note the missing forward 5" turret)

 
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