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Question for Navy Wives

Superclub

Registered User
pilot
I am just wondering, as my girlfriend has been questioning me lately about her own career options as I pursue my Navy one, what kind of careers, if any, that you wives have, or are pursuing. Thanks for any info you gals can give.
 

crysmc

MH-60S Pilot Wife
Super Moderator
Contributor
We have many different career women who are military wives on this site. I know that the Private Spouses Corner could really help out your girlfriend with this whole subject... you should ask your girlfriend to join us so that we can help answer her questions! Just because it's called the PSC doesn't mean it's limited to spouses only... we have many fiances, girlfriends, etc... so I promise she wouldn't feel out of place! :)
 

phrogpilot73

Well-Known Member
crysmc said:
Just because it's called the PSC doesn't mean it's limited to spouses only... we have many fiances, girlfriends, etc... so I promise she wouldn't feel out of place! :)
And by the etc... she means a guy who is getting out of the Marine Corps to become Navy wife, er, husband...
 

sirenia

Sub Nuke's Wife
I second crysmc on her suggestions. The PSC has a whole thread devoted to the careers Navy spouses and significant others have chosen to accommodate a military life. She is welcome to join!!
 

Kathy

FTS Pilot Wife
Super Moderator
Contributor
Not that we can't answer your question here too. :)

I'm a computer programmer. It's not really a field I'd recommend to anyone these days, not just Navy wives. Most of the available duty stations for aviators are in smaller-towns that don't have the opportunities available that a larger city would have. On the other hand, it's a career that's perfect for telecommuting if you're lucky enough to find a job willing to let you do it.

If I had known I was going to marry a military man, I would have pursued something in the medical or education fields. They seem to have the least trouble finding jobs in the smaller communities.
 

VarmintShooter

Bottom of the barrel
pilot
Medical seems to be a good bet. My wife is just getting into it, but there seem to be no shortage of jobs.

Wide range of opportunities too (depending on her educational goals) from <1 year programs to become a Medical Assistant, to a 2 year program to become a Surgical Technician, to a Nursing degree or MD. Lots of options and lots of good jobs.
 

TVal

Registered User
Gov't Contracting

I work for Northrop Grumman as a Business Process Reengineering Specialist. NG has contracts at bases all over the world so I'm hoping for an internal transfer when it comes time to move.
 

Pcola04/30

Professional Michigan Hater
pilot
I agree that the medical and education fields are popular choices. Seems that the pay is better in the medical field unless you hold an advanced degree and are lucky enough to teach at a local college.
 

sirenia

Sub Nuke's Wife
Pcola04/30 said:
I agree that the medical and education fields are popular choices. Seems that the pay is better in the medical field unless you hold an advanced degree and are lucky enough to teach at a local college.

Unless it is a high-demand field, this may not always work out. My advanced degree is in art history, which is usually non-existent in smaller cities and towns. Also, adjunct positions can be pretty hard to come by and are not as secure as tenure-track positions, therefore, not very reliable.
 

Thisguy

Pain-in-the-dick
Kathy said:
If I had known I was going to marry a military man, I would have pursued something in the medical or education fields. They seem to have the least trouble finding jobs in the smaller communities.
I work with alot of civilians here in the ROICC office. If you're a project engineer or contract specialist you can work for the government on practically any base. Stripping is a popular field as well.
 

bennett4362

deployment sucks
sirenia said:
Unless it is a high-demand field, this may not always work out. My advanced degree is in art history, which is usually non-existent in smaller cities and towns. Also, adjunct positions can be pretty hard to come by and are not as secure as tenure-track positions, therefore, not very reliable.
i second that; my master's is in applied linguistics, and i'm in the same position as sirenia.
 

ChunksJR

Staff wennie, on the sundown tour
pilot
Contributor
Brett327 said:
Which begs the question...what were you thinking in college? ;)

Brett
How did I know that you'd have to throw in something and that'd it be EXACTLY that.

As for my own reply: The Navy pays you well, sometimes better than other times, but especially once you deploy. ESPECIALLY if you are DINKs (Dual Income No Kids) the key for my wife is doing something she likes/loves.

My best friend is fininshing up training to be a Flight Doc and his wife has her masters in biochemistry...as soon as they got married (right before leaving San Diego and moving to Pensacola) she quit. Now she's a receptionist at a auto window replacement shop...AND LOVES IT. She's already got the "toughest job in the world" (Navy Spouse) so she might as well love doing whatever else she does.

Now, if she doesn't work and is anything like Jess, she'll get ansy at home. Nothing against house-work...I'd love to do it, but it's not for my wife.

Just some phat to chew on...
~D
 

Kathy

FTS Pilot Wife
Super Moderator
Contributor
Brett327 said:
How about you get yourself a degree which will make you financially solvent like an MBA, then you can do art as a hobby, or even a business.
:bouncy_12 I have an MBA! Does that finally earn me some respect, Brett? :D

Thisguy said:
I work with alot of civilians here in the ROICC office. If you're a project engineer or contract specialist you can work for the government on practically any base. Stripping is a popular field as well.
Working for the government would be a good back-up option, but I'm sure it doesn't pay nearly as well as corporate IT. Luckily, I'm pretty sure my current employer is going to let me telecommute once I move this summer, so I should be set for a while. I hope I didn't jinx myself by typing that - I should have a definitive answer in the next few weeks.
 

Kathy

FTS Pilot Wife
Super Moderator
Contributor
I've cleaned up this thread and moved the degree-type debate to the War Zone.
 
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