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NSS Facts

KSUFLY

Active Member
pilot
What do you have to lose...Jets of course!

The gradesheet would not be completed until a week or later and by then, the IP lost all recollection of the flight and decided to throw in his standard blurb.
In regards to "the standard blurb", it really gets me when the sim instructors grade the same regardless of how you do. The other day one of my sim instructors told me great flight and he doesn't have anything for me. He said that I'm well above the curve on all my manuevers. Then he filled out the gradesheet and changed a bunch of 4s to 3s and said, "I forgot, we always give threes on those graded items."
 

Malice 1

Member
pilot
In regards to "the standard blurb", it really gets me when the sim instructors grade the same regardless of how you do. The other day one of my sim instructors told me great flight and he doesn't have anything for me. He said that I'm well above the curve on all my manuevers. Then he filled out the gradesheet and changed a bunch of 4s to 3s and said, "I forgot, we always give threes on those graded items."
The gross lack of standardization in the sim instructors is the topic of another thread entirely. I'm just starting RI's, so I'll get to start the grading crapshoot with them next week.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
In regards to "the standard blurb", it really gets me when the sim instructors grade the same regardless of how you do. The other day one of my sim instructors told me great flight and he doesn't have anything for me. He said that I'm well above the curve on all my manuevers. Then he filled out the gradesheet and changed a bunch of 4s to 3s and said, "I forgot, we always give threes on those graded items."
Hit them on the critique. Be specific (names, events, etc). Don't just say "Sim instructors are non-standard." Your CO/Stan-O has to have something to take to build their case.
 

insanebikerboy

Internet killed the television star
pilot
None
Contributor
The gross lack of standardization in the sim instructors is the topic of another thread entirely. I'm just starting RI's, so I'll get to start the grading crapshoot with them next week.
I have to disagree. I've done fairly well in all of the sims thus far (bi's and ri's) and the instructors have graded fairly. I've gotten 4's where I deserved 4's, 5's where I deserved 5's. Plus, on grades that I've gotten and I didn't understand why, I asked them point blank why, and each time they told me (busted mda, timed improperly, etc, etc).

That said, there are a few instructors that are the exception, for example, I had one tell me (the previous ri flight, had gotten 3 fives) that since I had a santa clause that flight he'd see what he could do about fixing that. Ended up I rocked that flight too but he was purposefully giving me stuff not on the gradesheet. Believe me, come critique time he'll be on my paper.
 

KSUFLY

Active Member
pilot
I agree that it's not the grades that determine standardization but I think half the time they know what they're going to give you and don't pay attention to how you're flying in the sim. For example, the other day an instructor gave me a 3 (only one besides the "standard 3s that everyone gets") on my departure or climbout (one of those) and I asked what I could've done better. He said maintain 150 on the climb. I said that I was at 150 by 400 feet and never strayed from it all the way up to altitude. (I learned from my first CPT to hit 150 early and keep it right on all the way up.) He just gave me a blank stare and said, "Well, I have to hit you on something." Bull shit! No you don't. Just because I had a good flight doesn't mean you have to make shit up so you can give me a 3!
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
I've said it before and I'll say it again. CRITIQUE. Complete w/ name and the above story. Also, I'd give a thought to go talking to Stan (professionally, of course, don't go whining). They need to know this stuff.
 

Crowbar

New Member
None
Super Moderator
I've said it before and I'll say it again. CRITIQUE. Complete w/ name and the above story.
Also, don't forget to include YOUR OWN name on the critique. I worked in academics for a while and for some reason people are afraid to put their names on critique forms even when saying something good.
 

Cavt

Living the dream
pilot
As far as the knowing your ranking in college, I dont see that as really applying here. Your rank in college doesnt really matter, if you are the bottom person in your class you will still graduate, here you might not. In college as long as you pass all your tests and keep your average above failing you will walk away with a diploma (D is for diploma) my point being that you can't equate grades in college to grades/NSS here. And that was my original point, I know if Im failing in school or not, and if I have a 3.99 average in college and everyone else has a 4.0 yeah Im last but Im still probably going to get into the grad school of my choice and/or get the job of my choice. If we had NSS in college that would mean that 3.99 would get me nothing because my NSS would be in the crapper.
 

Heloanjin

Active Member
pilot
Your NSS doesn't determine if you are failing. There is no minimum NSS to pass or get wings.

Yes, I know, if your NSS is below 35 then there will be a Command Assessment which will determine if you, in fact, did meet the minimum Navy requirements. Why? Because MPTS expects every student to exceed MIF in some areas. It is possible a student could complete the syllabus having barely met MIF in everything, which is not meeting the minimum standard.

Will you know if this is you? Sure. Look at your grade sheets. Never or barely ever exceeding MIF? Then you should seek assistance from your chain of command.

If you are exceeding MIF often, then you have nothing to worry about, even if you end up with an NSS below 35. Perhaps you are tagged to go fly with the CO or his designated representative. If you have been exceeding MIF, you simply fly just as you have flown and you will continue to exceed MIF, meaning exceeding standards, and continue training.

Too much pressure? Guess how much pressure there is coming in to the deck on a no horizon, no moon night, 1/4 mile visibility, pitch 5, roll 8?
 

Cavt

Living the dream
pilot
None of this has anything to do with me worrying if I'm going to fail out of primary, not in the least. All I have been trying to do is get a better understanding of the things outside of flying, but still part of primary that have an effect on what my future holds, and I think this thread has done that for, hopefully, not just me...
 

doubledeuce

Tartan
None
Your NSS doesn't determine if you are failing. There is no minimum NSS to pass or get wings.
While I agree overall about worrying about your grades is typically a moo point, it is possible to graduate with respect to MNTS and still not have a minimum NSS for wings.
 

Heloanjin

Active Member
pilot
While I agree overall about worrying about your grades is typically a moo point, it is possible to graduate with respect to MNTS and still not have a minimum NSS for wings.
A moo point? What are you, a cow?

You quoted my first line but didn't seem to pay attention to it. There is no minimum NSS required for wings.
 

Heloanjin

Active Member
pilot
Sorry. I was overly broad when I said there is no minimum NSS to be winged.

Prior to MPTS, approval for designation (winging) of USN students with NSS below 35 came from CNATRA. Few requests were forwarded and/or approved. USMC never approved winging a student with sub 35 NSS.

Under MPTS/MNTS, students who have an NSS below 35 are referred to a Command Assessment. For Navy, the Trawing CO is the final authority for attrition or designation. For USMC/USCG, the student cannot be designated without the approval of the MATSG CO/USCG Liason Officer.

It isn't the NSS that determines if a student is winged. It is the assessment of the command that determines if a student is winged.
 
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