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Little known / experimental aircraft

zipmartin

Never been better
pilot
Contributor
I'm old enough to remember "The New Bob Cummings Show" from the early '60's. Bob Cummings was an actor from the '30's through the '60's whose godfather was Orville Wright. He learned to fly at an early age and was issued flight instructor certificate No. 1, making him the first official flight instructor in the United States. The Taylor Aerocar was featured regularly in his TV program, a sitcom where he played Bob Collins, a former World War II pilot who became a successful professional photographer. http://www.goldenwingsmuseum.com/collection/Aircraft Info Sheets/Aerocar.pdf
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
The aircraft that flew the last mission of WW2 (and unfortunately suffered the last fatality - Sergeant Anthony Marchione), the Consolidated B-32 Dominator. Just as the B-24 had a longer range than the B-17, the B-32 had a longer range (and more speed) than the B-29 despite having the same engines - a function of the "Davis Wing" [Only later was the reason for the Davis wing's performance properly understood. Largely through accident, the shape maintained laminar flow further back from its leading edge, to about 20 or 30% of chord compared to the 5 to 20% managed by most airfoil sections of the era. ] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_wing However, Consolidated had problems with the pressurization system, ultimately scrapping it and thus was limited to a lower altitude than the B-29.

Only 118 aircraft were produced and all were soon scrapped after the war. On 18 August 1945, two B-32's were flying surveillance over Japan when they were attacked. Although both aircraft survived, one was severely damaged and lost a crewmember. The next day, Allied forces began taking the propellers off all Japanese aircraft.

Good article detailing the mission from The National Interest.

Also from War History Online


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Prototype started with the same horizontal stabilizers and rudder setup as the B-24

31373

31374

31371

“Hobo Queen II” of the 386th Bomb Squadron, 312th Bomb Group
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Literally, a flying car, not a roadable airplane. Although not successful, can't argue with the simplicity of the concept.
Just saw this from the BBC. (good video)

A prototype flying car has completed a 35-minute flight between international airports in Nitra and Bratislava, Slovakia.

(not sure if Miami Vice is still the #1 new show…)


The hybrid car-aircraft, AirCar, is equipped with a BMW engine and runs on regular petrol-pump fuel.
Its creator, Prof Stefan Klein, said it could fly about 1,000km (600 miles), at a height of 8,200ft (2,500m), and had clocked up 40 hours in the air so far.
It takes two minutes and 15 seconds to transform from car into aircraft.



31419


31420
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot


-----------------

It can carry two people, with a combined weight limit of 200kg (31 stone).*
* 440 pounds

Clearly, this reporter hasn't ridden on any U.S. based airlines lately...
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
Is it practical? I don’t know - Scotty doesn’t know either…
Practical, who knows what the market will decide.

At a glance it seems a bit better than most of the other flying cars over the years (especially the perpetually in development/running joke Moller...).
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
The Douglas A-26 - later B-26 - Invader. One of the many US twin engine bombers powered by 2 Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engines, the Invader was an exceptionally long-lived aircraft. First flown in July 1942, it stayed in the US inventory until 1972. Anyone else want to chime in on what other WW2 piston airplanes had such longevity?

31724


31725
A B-26C Invader on a bombing run over Korea.

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A-26 cockpit interior

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A-26C-50-DT, AF Ser. No. 44-35918 marked as A-26B, AF Ser. No. 43-4287 "Versatile Lady" at the USAF History and Traditions Museum

31728

An A-26A of the 609th SOS in 1969
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
Wiki says the T-41 has been in service from 1965 to present day. Not exactly what you're asking though :D
 

Treetop Flyer

Well-Known Member
pilot
Assuming we’re talking about longevity in US use, wiki says the C-47 was in use until 2008.

This picture is from 2005, but it looks like a “formerly piston engine” aircraft there.

31729
 

jmcquate

Well-Known Member
Contributor
I read somewhere that the B was changed to A because of treaty obligations with Thailand (I think) on how many bombers that could be based in country. Also, never understood why there were two completely different B-26s.
 

brownshoe

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Assuming we’re talking about longevity in US use, wiki says the C-47 was in use until 2008.

This picture is from 2005, but it looks like a “formerly piston engine” aircraft there.

View attachment 31729
Now I am showing my age. I can't even tell you how many times the 47 was my cab ride. Even went to Yuma from Cecil on a 47 once, what a trip.;)
 
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