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Insider Scoop on Navy OCS

MikeMillerUK

Nearing the end of Primary
Contributor
PT location is dependent on outside temperature, so if it happens to be a warm day, you'll still be outside. If it's cold enough, you'll do indoor PT.
 

Lasoiree

Member
any insight on PT during the winter?
Much better than summer because most PT is indoor in the hallways, so you do a lot of push ups planks jumping jacks etc from a stationary position. Better than blistering outside in the heat of summer and you almost never run except for PRTs.
 

Bluecore

Well-Known Member
Hey Everyone! So this community has been really helpful in my preparing for OCS. I have to admit though, I am a little concerned about making it through OCS and doing well. I want to become a Navy Officer VERY much and, after all my research, it is definitely something that I can see myself really enjoying long-term.

I guess I am just concerned on how difficult it will be, especially being a non-prior going in. And I'm definitely worried about rolling for RLP - not knowing everything verbatim. I am trying to look over the materials now, but I find it somewhat difficult to memorize them all - especially with distractions. I will keep at it though.

Physically, I have been preparing -- hitting 68 push-ups and 77 sit-ups currently. Running is a work in progress, but is difficult in my current location because all running surfaces are hilly dirt trails - so I feel like my speed falls low because of that.

Any insight on OCS - if this is a normal concern to have - and insight on RLP and risk of rolling? Also, any insight on the Supply Officer career path (even Submarine Supply - since info is limited)?

Any thoughts would really be appreciated and helpful! I am scheduled for January 2016 OCS, but no official FINSEL yet! Thank you everyone!
Don't sweat it. I actually failed the NOS test by one question (2 points) and thought my world was going to end. I spent the following weekend remediating and aced the second test, and life went on.

RLP failure rate was about 15 students per class in a 90-100 person class when i left. Even less actually roll, maybe 2-5 per class.

I was extremely nervous for RLP. I was NOT squared away and couldn't fold for crap. You guys have to work as a class to help those that don't know how to accomplish those sorts of menial things. We only had 1 guy roll for RLP and he genuinely deserved to roll because his bearing was terrible, however he came out of H class a different person, and gained a ton of confidence.

I blew my salute (so i was told), botched my about face (so I was told), and even called Gunnery Sergeant Clarke a Master Sergeant. This all happened out in the p-way before I ever began the damn thing. During my RLP I don't think I got more than 2-3 whole pieces of information out of my mouth, and was gassed after about 3 minutes. I thought for sure I failed, but I still passed with an 87.

I passed because I was LOUD and INTENSE as shit, and I didn't give up. He saw that I was putting out and continued to give me the chance to get the knowledge out and I eventually did. If he gives you a command and you finish saying it, and he doesn't give you another one, keep saying it. If he's screaming something at you that demands a response while you're saying something else, interrupt yourself for an "AYE GUNNERY SERGEANT" or AYE <whoever>. Listen very closely to what they're saying to you during the evolution and respond accordingly and you'll be fine. I was so out of breath that it took me like 30 seconds to spit out a general orders. I probably spent 5 whole minutes of the 10 just saying aye gunnery sergeant. Make it your goal to lose your voice and you will almost certainly pass, and make sure your room is IMMACULATE. Those are your insurance policies. As I said, memorize appendix b before arriving. Clean every horizontal surface in your space, and for God's sake don't auto fail for a dirty head. Clean that part of the toilet bowl where water comes out, the part you can't see. Some of the RDCs and DIs have been known to put on a rubber glove and RB their finger across it, and you'll auto fail if their finger comes out dirty.
 
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Hair Warrior

New Member
Hey Everyone! So this community has been really helpful in my preparing for OCS. I have to admit though, I am a little concerned about making it through OCS and doing well. I want to become a Navy Officer VERY much and, after all my research, it is definitely something that I can see myself really enjoying long-term.

I guess I am just concerned on how difficult it will be, especially being a non-prior going in. And I'm definitely worried about rolling for RLP - not knowing everything verbatim. I am trying to look over the materials now, but I find it somewhat difficult to memorize them all - especially with distractions. I will keep at it though.

Physically, I have been preparing -- hitting 68 push-ups and 77 sit-ups currently. Running is a work in progress, but is difficult in my current location because all running surfaces are hilly dirt trails - so I feel like my speed falls low because of that.

Any insight on OCS - if this is a normal concern to have - and insight on RLP and risk of rolling? Also, any insight on the Supply Officer career path (even Submarine Supply - since info is limited)?

Any thoughts would really be appreciated and helpful! I am scheduled for January 2016 OCS, but no official FINSEL yet! Thank you everyone!
I have a college classmate who was a Submarine Supply Officer. He just separated from the Navy as an O-4 after a tour at Naval Reactors and a Wharton MBA. What do you want to know? I'll ask him. No promises.
 

kjsupply05

Supply Candidate for OCS
I have a college classmate who was a Submarine Supply Officer. He just separated from the Navy as an O-4 after a tour at Naval Reactors and a Wharton MBA. What do you want to know? I'll ask him. No promises.
Awesome! I guess just general Sub Supply Life and Career? Daily duties and what it's like? Anything in general would be interesting to know! Thanks!
 

JORGE

Registered User
What is the most effective way to show shop quals? e.j. CDI, Tire and wheel, Plane Captain etc. Those are in ASM. Should I include them in my personal statement?
 

CWO_change

New Member
Much better than summer because most PT is indoor in the hallways, so you do a lot of push ups planks jumping jacks etc from a stationary position. Better than blistering outside in the heat of summer and you almost never run except for PRTs.
I vote Fall as being the best, though! Indoor PT, which we did when it was raining outside, sucked big time; seriously, we drenched Nimitz halls in sweat and funk. But its still probably better than being outside in the middle of the summer.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
Awesome! I guess just general Sub Supply Life and Career? Daily duties and what it's like? Anything in general would be interesting to know! Thanks!
There is no 'sub supply' career path.

You can volunteer to be a sub chop while at supply school. You go to submarine officer basic course (SOBC) with the newly minted line officers in Groton, then you partake in the one week DH leadership course, since the sub chop is technically a department head job. Then you go off to the boat, where you will be responsible from day 1 for getting the parts the boat needs to get fixed, the ship's stores/food, and two divisions - the cooks and the logistics specialists. On top of that, you'll have to qualify submarines and will be expected to be part of the 3-section watch rotation underway as either a DOOW (the person who ensures the boat keeps proper depth) or contact manager (supervise solution development to make sure the sub collide with anyone).

It's a tough job from the amount of work you put in and the learning curve, but there are a few perks: 1) You don't have to stand any in-port duty 2) You don't have to partake in reindeer games when squadron picks apart all of the boat's admin during inspections and deployment workups and 3) You most likely won't have to participate post-watch reconstruction or any reporting messages that need to get off the boat, which can eat up a sizable portion of your off-going time. So essentially, you get to participate in the boat's mission more than any other first-tour supply job, and you get to avoid all of the admin headache on the back-end.

After that tour, you go into a 'normal' supply corps career path taking on responsibility on bigger ships with more parts/personnel to manage, and will most likely never step foot on a submarine ever again unless you go out of your way to visit one.
 

quang942003

New Member
i just got Pro-rec last week for EDO option, heading to OCS sometime soon, I see this one has a lot info for OCS but it is little old and last post was 2016, wonder if everything today still same? I am active duty and was in navy boot camp 2 years ago, how is OCS compare to enlist boot camp? (if anyone here was active duty before that commissioned ) , thank you
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
i just got Pro-rec last week for EDO option, heading to OCS sometime soon, I see this one has a lot info for OCS but it is little old and last post was 2016, wonder if everything today still same? I am active duty and was in navy boot camp 2 years ago, how is OCS compare to enlist boot camp? (if anyone here was active duty before that commissioned ) , thank you
There are a MILLION OCS threads out there that are way more recent. Use the search function
 
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