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Help with understanding PLC application process

CaseyL90

New Member
Okay, first thing to start off with, is YES, I have searched these forums before for any previous made threads about this topic. I have searched for "PLC", "Admission", "Process", "Commission", and other key words using advanced searched trying to find everything I could. I still have some questions to ask, but I think I got to majority of what is required.

About myself, I am a High School senior in northern California. I have applied to the Naval Academy, NROTC scholorship, and trying to figure out how to exactly do the PLC commissioning program. I want to become an SNA for the Marine Corps or Navy(Yes, PLC is just for Marines). My vision is NOT 20/20, but is somewhere around 20/100ish. (Possible for me to become a pilot at all? I have read posts saying NO, but they were dated back in 2002-2003) I have gotten accepted into some universities, with San Jose State University being the one I would go to out of all of them. I am pretty sure this is a PLC qualified school, correct me if I am wrong.

From what I have read, I need to sign up for the PLC-Air contract, and take the ASTB, as well as a PRT. I go to the officer school in Virginia for two summers if I get accepted.

I'll cut to the chase, and ask the questions right here.
1) When and where do I sign up for the PLC-Air contract application? Am I able to do it now? Do I got to MEPS to get an application? How do I contact my OSO for this?
2)When do I take the ASTB?
3)When do I take the PRT? (What are the minimum and maximum scores to get 300)?
4) Fourthly, this is probably the most important of my questions, when should I get PKR surgery? After/If I already get accepted into the flight program? Can I get it now, if I pay for it myself, or will that disqualify me?

I want to get PKR done soon, because I hear it takes 90 days to recover from it fully, and you must submit a medical waiver in 90 days, or something like that.

Also, I filled out some PLC application online at the official Marine website, but I got an email from them that did not say much at all. I also go the impression that is was about enlistment, and not the PLC program. I also did not receive any calls from them either.

YES, I have searched the whole forum for everything I asked questions about. ASTB, PRT, PLC, OSO-everything. I am new to the forum, but not new to forums

Thank you for taking the time to read this, and thank you even more for any helpful responses:)

-Casey
 

2ndGen

Third times a charm
I'll cut to the chase, and ask the questions right here.
1) When and where do I sign up for the PLC-Air contract application? Am I able to do it now? Do I got to MEPS to get an application? How do I contact my OSO for this?
2)When do I take the ASTB?
3)When do I take the PRT? (What are the minimum and maximum scores to get 300)?
4) Fourthly, this is probably the most important of my questions, when should I get PKR surgery? After/If I already get accepted into the flight program? Can I get it now, if I pay for it myself, or will that disqualify me?
I'll just give you answers as far as i've come to know them, from a very new to all this stand point (I'm still completing my package)

1. I'm not sure if San Jose state has an OSO or not, but it shouldn't matter because as long as it is an accredited four year university you should be ok. Just find out what the closest OSO is and call them. They will walk you throught their whole process.

2. You (if your like me) will take the ASTB after you go to MEPS. MEPS makes sure that you are medically qualified to be an officer for which ever branch you choose.

3. Not sure about the Navy PRT, but the Marine PFT you have to score at least 225 to be qualified. You will take numerous PFTs along the way, the first one is really up to your OSO.

4. If I were you, I would not get surgery at all. If you are correctable to 20/20 you should be ok.
 

CaseyL90

New Member
Thanks for the quick reply 2ndGen

Also, what exactly determines the type of aircraft you fly? Is it ASTB scores? Or is that just to get into the program?

Hopefully the Marines just don't stick your name in a hat and pull out who will be flying helos, jets, and props.

If you work harder than the rest, and show it, then will you get the aircraft you want to fly?



I requested information from the officer.marines.com site and got an email with a phone number.

I'll call that tomorrow, but hopefully they don't try to convince or trick me into enlisting-i've heard terrible stories about that:(

Thanks again
-Casey

Edit: Are you sure if my eyes are correctable to 20/20 I can fly? Like wearing contacts or something? I thought you needed perfect vision without any help...or is that for certain aircraft?

Edit 2nd time: Sorry, but I am also majoring in Mathematics. Is that alright? I was stuck in between aeronautical engineering and mathematics, but chose mathematics instead.
 

Herc_Dude

I believe nicotine + caffeine = protein
pilot
Contributor
Thanks for the quick reply 2ndGen

Also, what exactly determines the type of aircraft you fly? Is it ASTB scores? Or is that just to get into the program?
ASTB will have nothing to do with what you fly. Your performance in primary and advanced will.

Hopefully the Marines just don't stick your name in a hat and pull out who will be flying helos, jets, and props.
This may very well be how it happens, but most of us like to think they take your primary scores into account.

If you work harder than the rest, and show it, then will you get the aircraft you want to fly?
No, but it may increase your chances.


Sorry, but I am also majoring in Mathematics. Is that alright? I was stuck in between aeronautical engineering and mathematics, but chose mathematics instead.
Your major will not matter, just make sure you get your degree. Study something that you can put in your back pocket and use later in your life (like a degree in political science :eek:;))
 

CaseyL90

New Member
Thanks for the reply Devildog

Quick question,

What does NSS mean? And what does E-2, C-2. and P-3 mean?
 

DocT

Dean of Students
pilot
And what does E-2, C-2. and P-3 mean?
If you want to be a Marine you don't have to worry about it. We don't fly them.

Go see an OSO. He'll answer all these questions for you with the most current information.
 

2ndGen

Third times a charm
I am 99% sure that if you are correctable to 20/20 you will be okay to fly. When you get to MEPS make sure you take your time on the vision part of it and answer to the best of your ability. I rushed through it cause I thought I had bullit proof vision, and though I checked out with 20/20, I failed their depth perception test. Every thing is cool now ( I went to a civilian doc) but its just one more hassle you should try and avaid.

E2-C2 and P3 are just different aircraft the Navy uses.
 

Raptor2216

Registered User
Not so much. For pilot applicants, you have to be at least 20/40 correctable to 20/20, otherwise you will have to look into PRK. I believe for NFO's, you can get away with blindness...as long as its correctable to 20/20. I don't know anything about PRK so so some searching on here and you should find some helpful info.

As far as SJSU goes, you need to get in touch with the OSO at Moffet field. He is responsible for all the schools in the south bay. Let me know if you need more info on it...I did some PTAD there. PLC is a great program and if you do choose to stick with the military route, I highily recommend you apply for PLC.


I am 99% sure that if you are correctable to 20/20 you will be okay to fly. When you get to MEPS make sure you take your time on the vision part of it and answer to the best of your ability. I rushed through it cause I thought I had bullit proof vision, and though I checked out with 20/20, I failed their depth perception test. Every thing is cool now ( I went to a civilian doc) but its just one more hassle you should try and avaid.

E2-C2 and P3 are just different aircraft the Navy uses.
 

Maine Vaulter

USMC Candidate - Air
You don't have to wait until after MEPS to take the ASTB. I took, and passed it while I was still in high school. If I were you I would study for the test, call up the nearest OSO and take it before you have to deal with the more time consuming classes of college.
 

war eagle

Registered User
As a high school senior you're probably what, 17 or 18? Based on what my eye surgeon told me, I would wait on the surgery for a year or two. He advised me that your eyes need to stop "growing" - you have to have a steady prescription before you get PRK. Basically what I'm saying is this: find a good eye surgeon that will do PRK (you'll have to pay since you're not commissioned - mine was $5200) and he'll tell you when you should have it done. It'll take some work to correlate that time line with your OSO and a flight physical.

I got the surgery the summer after my junior year of college and did a flight physical the following February, approx. 9 months later. If I'm not mistaken, you have to wait 3 months between your PRK and your trip to NOMI/NAMI. You can fly (SNA) with glasses but you have to be correctable.

I hope this helps, I'm not PLC but I'm a 1370-select in NROTC. Sorry for the long post, good luck bro.

*and make sure you have ALL of your surgery documentation with you when you go for your physical.
 

phrogpilot73

Well-Known Member
Also, what exactly determines the type of aircraft you fly? Is it ASTB scores? Or is that just to get into the program?
ASTB is just to get into the program. Your grades in Primary, Advanced and the ever-present "Needs of the Marine Corps" determine what you fly. You could be a rock star with ridiculously high grades, if the Marine Corps needs helo pilots - you'll be a helo pilot.

Hopefully the Marines just don't stick your name in a hat and pull out who will be flying helos, jets, and props.

If you work harder than the rest, and show it, then will you get the aircraft you want to fly?
No. Everyone works hard, but in the end of the day - you fly what the Marine Corps needs you to fly. But you'll still love it (for what it's worth, Phrogs East was my 5th choice - and if I had it to do over again, it would be my first).

Edit: Are you sure if my eyes are correctable to 20/20 I can fly? Like wearing contacts or something? I thought you needed perfect vision without any help...or is that for certain aircraft?

Edit 2nd time: Sorry, but I am also majoring in Mathematics. Is that alright? I was stuck in between aeronautical engineering and mathematics, but chose mathematics instead.
As mentioned previously, you need 20/40 uncorrected, and correctable to 20/20 to be a pilot. After you get your wings (but not before) you can go down further than 20/40 but I don't remember the number. But you still have to be correctable to 20/20.

Major doesn't mean anything. You just have to have a 'B' (could be followed with either an 'A' or an 'S')
 

invertedflyer

500 ft. from said obstacle
Most questions have been answered here. Keep in mind that everything is competitive and relative. The higher your GPA, PFT score, ASTB score etc., the more competitive of a candidate you become. As far as the PFT, it is broken down into three physical events, pull-ups, crunches, and a 3-mile run. Each of these events is worth 100 points. Each individual pull-up is worth five points, each crunch 1 point, and every 10 seconds you run slower than 18 minutes costs you 1 point (6 points/ minute.). For example, if you run a 19-minute 3 mile you would deduct 6 points from your combined score. Max for pullups is 20, max crunches 100, and max for the run is 18:00. You must obtain a 225 or higher to attain a 'first class' pft score. This 1st class score should be a central goal of your own physical fitness regimine, as well as something important for your PLC package.

Your OSO is your ultimate resource when it comes to things like this... he'll be able to get you started on the process. If you continue on, you will likely go to PLC-Juniors the summer after your Freshman year in college, and then PLC-Seniors the summer after your Junior year. Good luck, good on you for starting early, and stay motivated!
 

CaseyL90

New Member
Wow, thanks guys!
These posts have been so helpful!




I have another question, because I talked to my friend today, but this is an entirely different subject, so I'll make a new thread. Check it out if you want, I think my friend may be getting tricked?
 

bosox144

New Member
PLC Combined Question

Hey guys quick question. I'm an incoming college freshman and have heard some rumors both ways about the future of the PLC combined program. Does anybody know for sure if they're going to keep/do away with this program? Thanks a lot.
 

MettGT

Registered User
pilot
Hey guys quick question. I'm an incoming college freshman and have heard some rumors both ways about the future of the PLC combined program. Does anybody know for sure if they're going to keep/do away with this program? Thanks a lot.
Back when I was doing PTAD there where already people on our board slated for PLC in 2009 and 2010, so I don't think that it's going away. PLC is the largest source of commissioning for the Marine Corps if I'm not mistaken. Either way, contact your OSO for the most recent information.
 
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