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A Word on OCS (as of 2 DEC 16)

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
98% huh? That seems awfully high given that in my experience we saw 1/3rd to 1/5th of every class roll for varied things.

I saw several people that didn't commission - and with good reason. A couple they kept rolling until they DOR'd. A couple others graduated OCS but rolled over to student pool and were eventually separated. Average of less than 1 per class. Also saw a fair number of DOR at every stage, including a couple of CANDIOs (one over his fiance, another for unclear reasons). Saw two Candio's get SEAWALL'd, and several others roll days away from graduation.

The program, even a couple of years ago before they started rolling these changes out, was no joke, though some certainly treated it that way.
out of all the people I put in I only had 2 that DOR'd, 1 just wasn't ready for OCS as she didn't bother to stay in shape, and 1 injured his back then due to the injury was found NPQ for aviation so DOR'd, I had 1 that rolled twice and now still serving, 1 that was medically discharged and then went back and commissioned, 1 that was on hold for surgery there but ended up commissioning as well. I did notice that once we couldn't do pre OCS PT checks more issues came up, it seems like a few classes had high roll rates but for the most part the reports we rec'd most classes a person rolling was a rarity.
 

LET73

Well-Known Member
"Graduating on time" and "graduating" are (or can be) remarkably different stats. In general, if you want to complete OCS, you will. My class started with about 75 people, of whom about 25 commissioned on the expected date. There were a small handful of DORs, and only one person I know of who was kicked out, following multiple attempts at remediation.
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
"Graduating on time" and "graduating" are (or can be) remarkably different stats. In general, if you want to complete OCS, you will. My class started with about 75 people, of whom about 25 commissioned on the expected date. There were a small handful of DORs, and only one person I know of who was kicked out, following multiple attempts at remediation.
That is a lot of roll outs and roll ins, much higher percentage than any of my guys told me about or I saw on the reports we rec'd.
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
"Graduating on time" and "graduating" are (or can be) remarkably different stats. In general, if you want to complete OCS, you will. My class started with about 75 people, of whom about 25 commissioned on the expected date. There were a small handful of DORs, and only one person I know of who was kicked out, following multiple attempts at remediation.
I’ll have to check the recent OCS reports. I’ve never seen “roll out” numbers like that before. Are many more people rolling out beyond week 1?
 

Meyerkord

Primary
I’ll have to check the recent OCS reports. I’ve never seen “roll out” numbers like that before. Are many more people rolling out beyond week 1?
Some, but not nearly as high as this person mentioned, at least while I was there. You get about 10-15 who roll on the IST, which is the biggest one, then maybe 2 on First Friday, 2 on fast cruise, and then it’s pretty scarce after that.
 

LET73

Well-Known Member
That was 2007, so I wouldn't be surprised if the numbers are looking pretty different now. I think we had a lot of people roll during the in-PRT, then there were injuries and swim failures and various other issues up through RLP. But other than the DORs and the one person who just couldn't pass, everyone who rolled did eventually graduate.
 

desertflyer

Well-Known Member
They let people unDOR? That’s bullshit. If you quit, that should be it.
Yes, they give you plenty of opportunities to unDOR if you change your mind. They put you through multiple interviews with everyone up the chain to make sure it's actually what you want to do. I think a lot of the interviews are cya for the Navy. Through just about every interview they will even try to talk you out of it, if they think you're someone on the edge that may want to go back in.

When I was there, there was one class that had a particularly hard class team, there was like 15 DORs. After seeing the high amount of DORs, after the interviews they actually brought them back all in asked once again if anyone would like to go back.
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
Yes, they give you plenty of opportunities to unDOR if you change your mind. They put you through multiple interviews with everyone up the chain to make sure it's actually what you want to do. I think a lot of the interviews are cya for the Navy. Through just about every interview they will even try to talk you out of it, if they think you're someone on the edge that may want to go back in.

When I was there, there was one class that had a particularly hard class team, there was like 15 DORs. After seeing the high amount of DORs, after the interviews they actually brought them back all in asked once again if anyone would like to go back.
Unbelievable. If you quit, that should be it. The pussification continues...
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
Accession programs 20+ years ago weren't any different. It's high-risk programs (flight school, BUD/S, SERE, Rescue Swimmer, etc) where it's one and done, even today.
When I went to AOCS in 1983, you were gone for good before you even got the R from DOR out of your mouth.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
When I went to AOCS in 1983, you were gone for good before you even got the R from DOR out of your mouth.
But did you DOR in 1983 to see what the actual process was? I'm not trying to be a smart ass, as it wouldn't surprise me what you say may very was true. I just wonder if what Candidates were told matched reality.

It would be interesting to know when the general attitude changed across any of the accession programs. Not that we'll ever find that out. It may have been in 1983 they just weren't worried about attrition numbers.
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
No one that ever said “DOR” appeared back in any class. They were sent to G Company and usually gone within 2 or 3 days. The word matches the reality.
 

abctotheabc

Well-Known Member
Rolling has definitely become more common at OCS. Before I graduated, we had a class have about 17 roll for the IST. DORs are pretty common too, especially within the first week before First Friday. Non-priors and priors.
 
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