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Why did you become an NFO?

ROTCMID

New Member
I am a Mid in NROTC right now and trying to choose what community I will pursue. Right now I really like what NFO's do and I am curious on why current NFO's have become NFO's and if it lived up with their expectations.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The search function is your friend! Lots of previous discussion on this topic for you to read through.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Really bad eyes, with my hand eye coordination though it was probably for the better.
 

IRfly

Registered User
None
I would recommend going the pilot route if for no other reason than it's hella easier to explain to people what you do in the Navy.

On the other hand, there are a slight few advantages to being an NFO. Your commitment will be shorter, you'll have a little more career flexibility, and no one will try to jam you into a job teaching primary flight students and then kick you out of the Navy a few years later.
 

Treetop Flyer

Well-Known Member
pilot
I would recommend going the pilot route if for no other reason than it's hella easier to explain to people what you do in the Navy.

On the other hand, there are a slight few advantages to being an NFO. Your commitment will be shorter, you'll have a little more career flexibility, and no one will try to jam you into a job teaching primary flight students and then kick you out of the Navy a few years later.
But If they do decide to kick you out of the navy, you won't have to worry about trying to explain what you did in the navy.
 

desertflyer

Well-Known Member
I would recommend going the pilot route if for no other reason than it's hella easier to explain to people what you do in the Navy.

On the other hand, there are a slight few advantages to being an NFO. Your commitment will be shorter, you'll have a little more career flexibility, and no one will try to jam you into a job teaching primary flight students and then kick you out of the Navy a few years later.
What's wrong with teaching primary students? Seems like a good gig.

I'm just curious, in your squadron are you ever looked down upon for being an NFO? I've talked to pilots going through API who pretty much laughed at the NFOs.
 

IRfly

Registered User
None
What's wrong with teaching primary students? Seems like a good gig.

I'm just curious, in your squadron are you ever looked down upon for being an NFO? I've talked to pilots going through API who pretty much laughed at the NFOs.
Nothing is wrong with teaching primary students. But as an NFO, you likely won't do it and there will be a far wider range of jobs available to you. In recent years, pilots who have been primary instructors have gotten hosed in the O-4 boards. Maybe (hopefully) that will change in the future.

I understand your curiosity, but in this line of work you need to learn to only care about the opinions of people who matter. In this case, the Navy's opinion is the one that matters. They pay you pretty well and and NFOs are well-represented in the upper echelons of the Navy. ADM Fallon was PACOM and CENTCOM. ADM Harris is currently PACOM.

Bottom line: being an NFO can take you wherever you want to go in the Navy, and you'll probably have a damn good time getting there. You will not, though, ever take your life into your own hands like pilots do. I have no regrets, but knowing what I know now, if I had had perfect eyesight at 22, I would choose pilot.
 

Uncle Fester

Robot Pimp
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
What's wrong with teaching primary students? Seems like a good gig.

I'm just curious, in your squadron are you ever looked down upon for being an NFO? I've talked to pilots going through API who pretty much laughed at the NFOs.
Their opinions may (or may not change) once they have actually flown an airplane with "Navy" or "Marines" painted on the side of it. Until then, they are college students wearing a flight suit.
Or when they get to their Fleet squadron and sit down across the desk from their two-anchor skipper. "Sir, you should know, I pretty much laugh at NFOs. I was number one in my API class."

Yeah, no. What flight school cones think they understand about aviation and the Fleet vs reality is pretty breathtaking.

It's a matter of what seat you sit in and what you do in the plane. That's it. There's plenty of "stick monkey" vs "window licker" shit talking but it's like a locker room or a big Irish family.
 
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