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Prep for and passing PRT at OCS

vincentjus

New Member
What is the requirement for passing the prt at OCS? Do we need a good low in all events or excellent low? (for our respective age)

77 PU
66 SU
12:24 1.5m run
 

blur

A-pool
pretty sure you only need to a sat med to not roll into H...you are going to struggle though if you barely make that. You should shoot for atleast good low. Your pushups are good; situps and run need some work.
 

vincentjus

New Member
I'm at least a Good Medium in all events (for a 29 year old.) Is that the minimum to graduate or do you need to be in the excellent category. I don't just want to meet the minimum.
 

BigRed389

Registered User
None
You take 3 PRTs, In, Mid, and Out. The sat medium category is for the in.

My memory is fuzzy on this but on the out you're required to get an excellent low averaged and no lower than a good low on any event.

That said, nobody ever really worries about passing the out PRT. I didn't really stress about the specifics b/c I was sure I'd pass...we were more worried about contributing to getting the PT streamer for the class. By then you'll be in pretty damn good shape.
 

CaptainRon

Member
pilot
Contributor
And you do want to show up in great shape, obviously. The fastest way people get rolled is by showing up and struggling with the PT, because this is really all the DI sees of you at the beginning (that and volume pretty much).

Classes were 3 weeks apart when I was there. It may be shorter now. Either way, you don't want to extend your stay by going to a new class (although this is very common, and not the end of the world if it happens).
 

WIDGET

New Member
it seemed like the PT studs didn't get rolled as much for things like RLP ... not that it's subjective or anything.
 

ArkansasFlyBoy

New Member
None
And make sure you have good form, or else you may hear, "that wasnt a pushup, minus 20!!!" Don't be that guy who shows up on the radar right off the bat.
 

Ken_gone_flying

"I live vicariously through myself."
pilot
Contributor
All you need is a Sat Med not to roll to H, but yes, definitely have good form. This coming from a guy who took the in PFA just 9 weeks ago.
 

WOLFSON

Member
I was only ever worried about the in-PFA, you'll lose upwards of 20% of your class on this event alone. It's a fantastic tool to weed out those not ready to continue with the real training of OCS, be it physical or mental.

Before I got to OCS I could do about 70 pu, 100 su, and a 9:50 1.5mi. My in-PFA scores were like 55 pu, 82 su, and 10:15 1.5 mi run. You'll be tired, disoriented, and intimidated during the in-PFA and it can really affect your scores. Work hard now to be ready to weather those factors during the test.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
The biggest thing for the PFA is that I don't think most people practice properly for it.

Pushups: must be done with knife hands, head looking forward. You must make 90 degree angles with your elbows. This makes a huge difference in the amount you can do. Also, there is no such thing as stopping early, but above all else maintain form. Better to do 60 perfect PU than 80 not perfect ones; the latter will get you zeroed.

Situps: must be done with knife hands, arms cannot move at all. Again, same as above: maintain form above all else. You only need to pass the in-PFA, not be a hero.

Run: This is the biggest one because there is about 1/4 - 1/2 mi worth of warmup running before you actually do the run. The guy testing me at the recruiting station made me privvy to this, so I was ready for it. If you're on the cusp, this is going to make you roll because the warmup lap will feel pretty darn fast. Make sure you can do 2 miles before crapping out.

I didn't really feel like fatigue was a factor in my in-PFA, tbh, but maybe it was because my run was 1:00 faster just a week later. But I digress: maintain form, and expect to run more than just 1.5 miles.
 

Tyler

!
pilot
Contributor
The biggest thing for the PFA is that I don't think most people practice properly for it.

Pushups: must be done with knife hands, head looking forward. You must make 90 degree angles with your elbows. This makes a huge difference in the amount you can do. Also, there is no such thing as stopping early, but above all else maintain form. Better to do 60 perfect PU than 80 not perfect ones; the latter will get you zeroed.

Situps: must be done with knife hands, arms cannot move at all. Again, same as above: maintain form above all else. You only need to pass the in-PFA, not be a hero.

Run: This is the biggest one because there is about 1/4 - 1/2 mi worth of warmup running before you actually do the run. The guy testing me at the recruiting station made me privvy to this, so I was ready for it. If you're on the cusp, this is going to make you roll because the warmup lap will feel pretty darn fast. Make sure you can do 2 miles before crapping out.

I didn't really feel like fatigue was a factor in my in-PFA, tbh, but maybe it was because my run was 1:00 faster just a week later. But I digress: maintain form, and expect to run more than just 1.5 miles.
Excuse my ignorance, but could you explain "knife hands"?

Also, what's a typical PT run distance during OCS?
 

BACONATOR

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Excuse my ignorance, but could you explain "knife hands"?

Also, what's a typical PT run distance during OCS?
Hand is straight out with fingers and thumb together. Think a karate chop hand.

OCS is typically 2-3 miles. You won't (or will rarely) see a run over 3.

BTW, if you run more than 12 before OCS (myself included), you may not roll at OCS (if you can get under 13:15 for the PRT), but you WILL run less than 12:00 in the "real" Navy (ie: flight school). If you can't get under 12 with some serious work put in, you suck.
 
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