• Please take a moment and update your account profile. If you have an updated account profile with basic information on why you are on Air Warriors it will help other people respond to your posts. How do you update your profile you ask?

    Go here:

    Edit Account Details and Profile

Medical Condition "Bible"

jcj

Registered User
Penile fractures included? ;)

Honestly, Doc…great and informative post. Thanks.
thanks

penile fractures are just as bad as they sound like they would be - maybe worse. In humans there's no bone down there to be fractured, what happens is the structures that fill up with blood when one is "ready" can get lacerated - in other words torn open - when things get too wild and, I guess you'd say the AoA is wrong. Of course when this happens one is immediately "un-ready". It hurts immediately and just as bad as you'd imagine it would (or worse), and a trip to the ED and surgery almost always follows.

I don't do urology, but I did some in training and I helped fix a couple of these - you explore the injury, you sew everything back together & wait for it to heal. Sometimes things work right afterwards, sometimes not.

So be careful out there, cuz' this is definitely one problem to avoid if you can. If there is any consolation, it's neither in the MANMED or the NAMI waiver guide so I guess if one has one & gets it repaired, it's apparently not a DQ.
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
I recently met with my recruiter and filled out the medical paper work. I checked that I had never broken any bones, because I assumed that a fracture wasn't a break. Should I have put yes? Do I need to notify him? Or am I thinking to much?

All of your medical forms have something along the lines saying you've filled the form out to the best of your knowledge. I wouldn't worry about it with your recruiter. I'd just mention it at MEPS... because no one ever checks the previously marked forms... otherwise you wouldn't have to redo them EVERY time you get a physical etc.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
All of your medical forms have something along the lines saying you've filled the form out to the best of your knowledge. I wouldn't worry about it with your recruiter. I'd just mention it at MEPS... because no one ever checks the previously marked forms... otherwise you wouldn't have to redo them EVERY time you get a physical etc.
Depending on the MEPS (Doc's policy) if something is disclosed that isn't on the form they can and have stopped processing and will send you home saying come back another day with correct forms. I have some that have disclosed items that I was amazed they continued processing, and others I was pissed because it was a minor item that should not have had an affect.
 

Renegade One

Well-Known Member
None
thanks

penile fractures are just as bad as they sound like they would be - maybe worse. In humans there's no bone down there to be fractured, what happens is the structures that fill up with blood when one is "ready" can get lacerated - in other words torn open - when things get too wild and, I guess you'd say the AoA is wrong. Of course when this happens one is immediately "un-ready". It hurts immediately and just as bad as you'd imagine it would (or worse), and a trip to the ED and surgery almost always follows.

I don't do urology, but I did some in training and I helped fix a couple of these - you explore the injury, you sew everything back together & wait for it to heal. Sometimes things work right afterwards, sometimes not.

So be careful out there, cuz' this is definitely one problem to avoid if you can. If there is any consolation, it's neither in the MANMED or the NAMI waiver guide so I guess if one has one & gets it repaired, it's apparently not a DQ.
Ah, yes…now I remember the WARNING and CAUTION notes:

1. Never exceed recommended penetration speed or angle-of-attack.
2. Always ensure your intended destination is accepting traffic. A PPR may be required. CHECK NOTAMS…these can change daily/hourly and without prior notice due to unforeseen changes in destination conditions.
3. Avoid back-course approaches unless specifically cleared for approach and penetration. Be aware of the potential for opposite-direction departing traffic and/or shifting wind conditions.
4. When on final or in the "in close" position, pay attention to the final controller and Landing Signal Officer. Be prepared for WAVE-OFFS until safely "in the groove" with a "ready/clear deck". BE SMOOTH.
5. An "out of limits" pitching deck can result in cancellation of operations. Know the Missed Approach and BINGO/RTB procedures prior to having to execute them.
 

jmcquate

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Ah, yes…now I remember the WARNING and CAUTION notes:

1. Never exceed recommended penetration speed or angle-of-attack.
2. Always ensure your intended destination is accepting traffic. A PPR may be required. CHECK NOTAMS…these can change daily/hourly and without prior notice due to unforeseen changes in destination conditions.
3. Avoid back-course approaches unless specifically cleared for approach and penetration. Be aware of the potential for opposite-direction departing traffic and/or shifting wind conditions.
4. When on final or in the "in close" position, pay attention to the final controller and Landing Signal Officer. Be prepared for WAVE-OFFS until safely "in the groove" with a "ready/clear deck". BE SMOOTH.
5. An "out of limits" pitching deck can result in cancellation of operations. Know the Missed Approach and BINGO/RTB procedures prior to having to execute them.
So what exactly will get you an OK3?
 

jcj

Registered User
These are both fractures & you should report them - even if it means a call to your recruiter with a "I forgot to report them when I filled out my forms". Unlikely either will be a problem with your accessioning, provided you don't have a malunion (failure to heal) the fractures have healed without any gross deformity. Given you're 20 now, the fact that the fracture in your foot is in the growth plate is of no consequence since you're unlikely to grow taller. If you had a malunion, in your foot, you'd know because it would move in a place it wasn't supposed to whenever you walked.

The sternal fracture is more interesting, but also probably not a problem unless there was a malunion. Here's how you check - put the fingers of your dominant hand over where the break was. Turn your head away (doesn't matter what direction, just don't cough on self or others) and cough hard several times. If the sternum under your fingers (where the fracture was) is stable & doesn't move, you're fine. If with hard coughing you feel a "click" you may have a malunion problem.

I am also assuming that you didn't have to have surgery for the sternal fracture, if you did that will stand out on your chest xray and changes the whole picture because you'll have sternal wires, etc.

I doubt you have either, but if you do they can be fixed. But any rate, you need to report them. The foot issue might not ever be found, but old sternal fractures can sometimes be seen on chest x-ray. and you don't want someone to discover that on your chest x-ray when you didn't report it.

good luck
 

Mr Spenz

"Your brief saved your flight' - every IP
pilot
These are both fractures & you should report them - even if it means a call to your recruiter with a "I forgot to report them when I filled out my forms". Unlikely either will be a problem with your accessioning, provided you don't have a malunion (failure to heal) the fractures have healed without any gross deformity. Given you're 20 now, the fact that the fracture in your foot is in the growth plate is of no consequence since you're unlikely to grow taller. If you had a malunion, in your foot, you'd know because it would move in a place it wasn't supposed to whenever you walked.

The sternal fracture is more interesting, but also probably not a problem unless there was a malunion. Here's how you check - put the fingers of your dominant hand over where the break was. Turn your head away (doesn't matter what direction, just don't cough on self or others) and cough hard several times. If the sternum under your fingers (where the fracture was) is stable & doesn't move, you're fine. If with hard coughing you feel a "click" you may have a malunion problem.

I am also assuming that you didn't have to have surgery for the sternal fracture, if you did that will stand out on your chest xray and changes the whole picture because you'll have sternal wires, etc.

I doubt you have either, but if you do they can be fixed. But any rate, you need to report them. The foot issue might not ever be found, but old sternal fractures can sometimes be seen on chest x-ray. and you don't want someone to discover that on your chest x-ray when you didn't report it good luck
The chest x-ray is on Monday of Indoc week too.
 

DCPerilli

New Member
Hi All -

When I was 18 I went to the doc with shoulder pain. He said I had a partially torn labrum in my right shoulder (no dislocation). He recommended therapy. I did PT and that was the end of it - never got surgery.

I do a lot of crossfit and I have full range of motion throughout both shoulders. I can do regular pushups, diamonds, boxes, whatever other shape you want me to do. I can do pull ups both normal and weighted. My shoulder is not an issue right now. I'm currently 23.

My question: Will this be an issue when it comes to the physical?

NFO is my #1 choice.
 
Last edited:

Green11

Living the dream
I had a torn labrum in both shoulders with no dislocation (different times) and on my waiver paperwork, it said I was initially NPQed but then PQ after the surgery and waiver. Your circumstances may be different, but I doubt it. If you end up having to go through the process, make sure you stay on top of BUMED/whoever you're working with to get the waiver because it takes forever. I started a thread awhile back about my experience with the process. Just search "Golden Shoulder" and you should find it. Also, the flight docs on here and the NAMI Waiver Guide will have more detailed information. Good luck!
 

Sheepdip

Member
Contributor
I had SLAP surgery when I was 18 on my throwing arm, had no issues getting cleared/waivered for commission. I wouldn't sweat it.

However, my advice is to preempt the issue and get examined by an orthopedist. Ask for a military duty clearance letter as it will make your waiver process much easier. Without it, they may ask you to be examined by a military doc after MEPS. In the letter, use key terms like asymptomatic, full ROM etc, and don't be afraid to dictate to the doctors secretary EXACTLY what the letter needs to say. It is preferable if you can get the letter from the doc who originally saw you. Not the end of the world if you have to see someone else, though. I had to get letters for multiple orthopedic and back issues. Long process but it will make the waiver process much smoother.
 

IntelNinja

I get to make up my own? Hmm...
Ditto to what Sheepdip said.

Same thing...torn labrum on my R shoulder. SLAP repair done a few years ago. Didn't impact my selection/commission because I got a full orthopedic evaluation from the same doctor that performed the surgery and did all my post-op evals. I went in telling him what I needed the letter for, they checked that I still had full range of motion and no loss of strength and gave me the letter. The doctors at MEPS read the letter, re-checked me for ROM and strength and recommended the waiver. N3M concurred with all the documentation submitted and granted the waiver.

Selection/Commission still happened.

Do the groundwork/homework if you think you might need a waiver. Better to have the paperwork and not need it (unlikely...you'll most likely need it) than to need it and not have it and then be left to scramble to try to get it before missing a deadline.

Don't lie or mislead if there is a problem, and if so, get it fixed. Getting it fixed isn't a problem. But not getting a problem fixed, pretending there isn't one, then bringing it to their attention is bad.
 

navy2014

Member
I don't even want to type this, but I know this is the best place to ask. I've read what Ch. 15 of the MANMED has to say about asthma, and I've done some other reading, so I know that it's only disqualifying if it was diagnosed after age 12. However, after reading the thread about the guy's ADHD and shoulder tear, it's clear that the people here know a lot of details about what the Navy is looking for specifically with each issue. So:

I'm filling out my MEPS paperwork, and the only question I might need to put "yes" for (and explain) is the one about asthma. I don't know if I actually have to say yes to the question, because I have absolutely no medical history. To explain--as a kid, I never went to the doctor after elementary school (age 10) (sometime in there) except for things like being covered in poison ivy, etc. We didn't have health insurance. I have no medical records (pediatrician doesn't have anything for me from that far back) except for whatever stuff is out there since I became an adult and have gone for physicals, blood tests, etc.

However, I know that at some point before I was 8 or 9 I had trouble breathing, and my mom didn't want to believe it was related to her smoking, so she took me to the doctor who gave me an inhaler. I used it once in a while, but I never needed it again after she stopped smoking (ironically because she woke up having a hard time breathing). I've never had problems associated with being asthmatic like violent wheezing or shortness of breath related to athletic activities. The most it ever felt like was what I know adults feel now when they have chest colds. I've always been extremely athletic, especially in terms of endurance / cardio stuff that people associate with being limited by asthma--track in high school, half marathons / other races, and I will have no problem scoring the max score on the 1.5 mile in the PRT. I haven't used an inhaler in at least 15 years, probably more, and if I was ever diagnosed with asthma, it was a very long time ago.

What are they looking for here? What should I say on my form? Thank you.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
I would not put "diagnosed for asthma" I would mention being prescribed an inhaler, in order to really be diagnosed with asthma you would have to have had many test.
 
Top