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Medical Condition "Bible"

LFCFan

*Insert nerd wings here*
What's even worse is getting NPQ'ed further down the line. We had a slew of NA/NFO seelectees in our OCS class that got NPQ'ed right around candio phase. Especially for stuff that should've shown up at MEPS, that was the kicker.

It does suck, but the upside is that you redesginate. If you don't survive your flight physical with the AF, you have to reapply for a non-rated (non aviation) job, which are really competitive just like their corresponding jobs in the Navy (intel etc). The Marines do their flight phys up front, but I'm not sure if you have to reapply for a ground contract should it not go well. So I'm glad that I at least managed to walk away from OCS with an intel slot that I probably wouldn't have got coming in as a civilian. As painful as the system is, I think that getting contracted to be a pilot (unlike the academy or ROTC) and then getting offered something else when NAMI whammied, but being able to walk away if you want, is probably the best deal you could get coming off the street as far as designation goes. A lot of people at OTCN I spoke with were Academy SWOs who were NPQed after their commitment, and didn't have access to restricted line options. Academy and ROTC folks can only go URL unless they have some issue that prevents them from being URL qualified (like colorblindness). I got hit on anthros, and had I been a ROTC or academy guy I wouldn't have been able to go intel.

Of 10 guys with pilot in my class, three of us were outright NPQed, one is still fighting NAMI, and one is just in a waiting period after some treatment before he can apply for a waiver (he's expected to get through). One of our SNFOs was NPQed for motion sickness during IFS. So out of 19 guys and 1 gal, we've lost four, and could lose another two, just on medical alone. One other guy had some issues pop up down at NAMI but made it through in the end. (I apologize to any hopefuls reading this, I don't want to scare you off)
 

BeLikeMike

Primary!!!
What's even worse is getting NPQ'ed further down the line. We had a slew of NA/NFO seelectees in our OCS class that got NPQ'ed right around candio phase. Especially for stuff that should've shown up at MEPS, that was the kicker.
What were some of the stuff that they were being NPQ'ed for?
 

Tycho_Brohe

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
What were some of the stuff that they were being NPQ'ed for?
Mostly for eyesight issues, plus one for anthros (sitting arm's reach quarter of an inch too short), and one for something like childhood asthma/inhaler use (but he was able to work that out, so he's down here in P'cola now). But vision was definitely the lynchpin in most cases, and they do depth, VA, and color at MEPS, so unless your vision gets significantly worse during what's usually a relatively short time between MEPS and Medical Monday, getting NPQ'ed mere days before commissioning (or even the day of) is totally ridic.
 

LFCFan

*Insert nerd wings here*
In my class:
1. History of stress fractures (guy went to OCS year+ ago, got hurt, months in med hold and student pool, sent home, healed, reapplied, got pilot instead of NFO, got NPQed because of history) - Went supply
2. Some sort of mild heart rhythm issue that was barely outside of standards - went CEC
3. Thing that was detected on an MRI that they thought was a tumor, wasn't a tumor, tons of civ docs said he was totally fine, still gets NPQed, still in redesignation process. Just found out a few minutes ago, I had listed him as "still fighting" earlier today.
4. Low blood pressure problems 10 years ago that have cleared up, and sitting height - went Intel (me)

A few other folks from other classes after me had eye related issues and went SWO or supply. One NUPOC guy ended up going to be an instructor in Charleston, can't remember why.

one for something like childhood asthma/inhaler use (but he was able to work that out, so he's down here in P'cola now).

Was this the guy who actually went to NAMI during candio phase? I know his whole story, but hadn't heard anything since I left student pool.
 

Tycho_Brohe

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Was this the guy who actually went to NAMI during candio phase? I know his whole story, but hadn't heard anything since I left student pool.
Hmm I'm not sure if he went to NAMI, we didn't talk about it much at the time. If you know his name, I can PM you to confirm.

There was one guy who was told in candio phase that he needed an MRI that for some reason couldn't be scheduled until several days after our graduation (or they wouldn't be able to get the results until after graduation, or something along those lines), and to the best of my knowledge, he's still in student pool.

Another one, a prior, was told in candio phase that he was NPQ'ed from AMDO et al for eyesight, and on top of that, he might not be able to stay active duty at all. As a guy with 10 years of service,, halfway to retirement, he was understandably pissed that they almost just kicked him out of the Navy a week short of commissioning, even though he would've made it to 20 years had he never gone to OCS in the first place. Last I heard, it's looking (relatively) good, which I took to mean he might get to go back to active duty at his current rate of E-6, but he's also still in the pool.
 

BeLikeMike

Primary!!!
Wow now some of these medical DQ stores have me worried. Seems like NAMI finds the slithest thing to NPQ someone or am I just reading too much into this.
 

Tycho_Brohe

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Wow now some of these medical DQ stores have me worried. Seems like NAMI finds the slightest thing to NPQ someone or am I just reading too much into this.
That's what I thought, but maybe they're just being really anal about who's flying the multi-million dollar equipment. Either way, it sucks, but it's beyond control and is therefore not worth stressing about.
Besides, if it were easy, everyone would do it.
 

Renegade One

Well-Known Member
None
Wow now some of these medical DQ stores have me worried. Seems like NAMI finds the slithest thing to NPQ someone or am I just reading too much into this.
I know it's some serious stuff that weighs heavily on your mind (as is probably normal), and I don't mean to be flip…but it's a buyer's market right now.
 

LFCFan

*Insert nerd wings here*
Wow now some of these medical DQ stores have me worried. Seems like NAMI finds the slithest thing to NPQ someone or am I just reading too much into this.

Most people get through, and the sister company in my class had no NPQs (at least at OCS). Mine was hit really hard, as was the class after it. We were just really unlucky. Don't sweat it, it is beyond your control, and unlike ROTC or the Academy no one will force you to take a designator you don't want should you be NPQed.
 

vladivostok391

Lieutenant, U.S. Navy
Hello all. I had LASIK surgery back in May of this year to correct my vision, which is now 20/20 with no side effects or issues. My concern is over my pre-LASIK diopter measurements, which were over the -8.00 limit set by the Navy. I was at about -9.50 in my left eye and -11.25 in my right eye. So far, my research has shown that, at least unofficially, the Navy will only grant a waiver up to -10.00 diopters pre-LASIK... can anyone confirm this?

I know waivers are based on the needs of the Navy, and I am beyond the waiverable limits that I have been able to unofficially find in various forums around the web. That said, I still plan to submit my application package based on my commitment to serve my country. I will not be deterred from at least trying. Thank you in advance.

A little about me:

29 y/o male, non-prior service
B.S. International Relations (3.6 GPA), J.D. Law (3.3 GPA)
Currently work for Dept. of Justice in intel / law enforcement (4 years experience)
Applying to Intel Board
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
There are 2 standards, the standard for enlistment and the standard for programs leading to a commission, in regards to programs leading to commission the max is +/-6 for URL and +/- 8 for RL I have only seen that waivered for nukes.
 

vladivostok391

Lieutenant, U.S. Navy
Thank you very much for the info, NavyOffRec. I've seen those numbers quoted on some other forums / threads, and I've also seen talk of the possibility of waivers up to +/-10. Neither helps me much, but if I've learned anything in this process, it is to keep pushing forward and see what happens... gotta try, right!
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Thank you very much for the info, NavyOffRec. I've seen those numbers quoted on some other forums / threads, and I've also seen talk of the possibility of waivers up to +/-10. Neither helps me much, but if I've learned anything in this process, it is to keep pushing forward and see what happens... gotta try, right!
Their might be talk, but in reality the odds are slim, the one guy I had was .25 over and I thought he was sunk, when he was approved I asked N3M how that happened and what I was told was "he is a nuke, otherwise he wouldn't have been" and that was for URL so he was at -6.25 when the new N3M doc came in and I asked about a different situation I said "it was waivered before" I was told the new doc is more strict on the standards.

I would get your medical submitted to N3M ASAP to get a decision.
 

vladivostok391

Lieutenant, U.S. Navy
Copy, thanks. I know it isn't easy these days to get waivers of any kind, given the high level of competition for spots, but I definitely will get on my medical and at least give it a shot.
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
(Admins, request this post be stickied)

All,

The Manual of the Medical Department (MANMED) Chapter 15 is an excellent source when it comes to determining eligbility for service. While items like certain allergies, asthma, etc. are automatic DQs, the MANMED covers all other conditions that are allowed, waiverable, DQ for URL, and simply DQ altogether. The MANMED is essentially the bible when it comes to looking up certain conditions top to bottom and whether they're allowed in the service. If you have a certain condition that you think is questionable, doing the homework can save time on the recruiter's end and especially your end. Of course, if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask! The manual is linked below, click on Chapter 15 to open it up. Good stuff starts on page 29:

http://www.med.navy.mil/directives/Pages/NAVMEDP-MANMED.aspx
 
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