• Please take a moment and update your account profile. If you have an updated account profile with basic information on why you are on Air Warriors it will help other people respond to your posts. How do you update your profile you ask?

    Go here:

    Edit Account Details and Profile

Looking for gouge? Ask your Stupid Questions about Naval Aviation here (Part 1)

Status
Not open for further replies.

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Just curious, A4s, did anyone ever experience a failure of the speed brakes on just one side? That could have been interesting... :eek:
Dunno about the A-6, but the EA-6 has a null detector which automatically puts the boards back in if it detects asymmetric speedbrake position of more than 8 degrees (full speedbrake extension = 120 degrees). One of the things you test before leaving the line is that this gadget works.
 

A4sForever

BTDT OLD GUY
pilot
Contributor
Dunno about the A-6, but the EA-6 has a null detector which automatically puts the boards back in if it detects asymmetric speedbrake position.....
Probably the same -- I can't remember -- and probably why I never saw/remember any asymmetric S/B deployment.

Watch out for shuttin' down those engines, though -- at least until they retro-fitted the throttle quadrant. :D
 

sbfighter

New Member
operational tours vs Flying a Desk

How long does a naval aviator generally fly with a fleet (with a carrier)?

I guess a better stupid question is, how long before the Navy wants you to move on to flying a desk?
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Probably the same -- I can't remember -- and probably why I never saw/remember any asymmetric S/B deployment.

Watch out for shuttin' down those engines, though -- at least until they retro-fitted the throttle quadrant. :D
Not only can you not shut the engines down by slamming the throttles back, you can only shut them down one at a time. Think they fixed that little glitch pretty well . . .
 

A4sForever

BTDT OLD GUY
pilot
Contributor
Not only can you not shut the engines down by slamming the throttles back, you can only shut them down one at a time. Think they fixed that little glitch pretty well . . .
Roger that ... after assorted inflight shutdowns .... and after we dumped one in Subic Bay ... :D
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
How long does a naval aviator generally fly with a fleet (with a carrier)?

I guess a better stupid question is, how long before the Navy wants you to move on to flying a desk?
First operational tour is almost always 3 years. Then you go to "shore duty", which may or may not be a flying assignment. From then on it varies a bit based on your community, the optempo of the war, and your own plans. Ideally, you rotate 3 years of operational flying (flying in the fleet) and then 2-3 years shore duty which is usually not flying. That would include grad school, staff work, ship's company, exchanges, war college, things like that. Hopefully some of the current active guys can give you their experiences.
 

sbfighter

New Member
and then 2-3 years shore duty which is usually not flying. That would include grad school, staff work, ship's company, exchanges, war college, things like that.
In regards to grad school, is one able to go to the college of his choice and remain in active duty or does one have to attend a navy-affiliated college (like in Monterey..)?
 

e6bflyer

Used to Care
pilot
In regards to grad school, is one able to go to the college of his choice and remain in active duty or does one have to attend a navy-affiliated college (like in Monterey..)?
For our black shoed bretheren, they can do either and it really doesn't affect them. For aviators, to go to grad school AS a shore duty is basically a career ender. To go to grad school WHILE on shore duty (working full time in a competitive flying job ie FTS or training command and going to school) is just fine. Guys go to either civilian or military schools. The civilian route is usually through being a ROTC instructor and getting a break on your tuition that way, the military route is usually just a set of orders to NPS or other service equivilent.
There are also a bunch of guys who do the EMBA, basically teleconferencing from their shore duty site to NPS and taking classes that way.
If the Navy foots the bill, either through graduate vouchers or through NPS, you owe them 2 years for the first year of education and 1 year for every year thereafter. This runs concurrently with any other obligation you have.
So...lots of choices, but if you absolutely want a Masters, the opportunities are almost endless.
I am sure that there are some other programs and variations that I have missed, but in my brief experience, these are the usual paths that are taken.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
For aviators, to go to grad school AS a shore duty is basically a career ender.
I can tell you from seeing several of my colleagues who on their first shore tour went to NPS or fellowship programs where getting a masters was one of the two main goals, this is definitely not the case. Even for a first shore tour.

If you do a school later in your career, like one of the War College, Command and Staff schools or a special program like an Olmstead or the JFK School of Government at Harvard, that is seen as a career boost and not a career ender.
 

e6bflyer

Used to Care
pilot
I can tell you from seeing several of my colleagues who on their first shore tour went to NPS or fellowship programs where getting a masters was one of the two main goals, this is definitely not the case. Even for a first shore tour.

If you do a school later in your career, like one of the War College, Command and Staff schools or a special program like an Olmstead or the JFK School of Government at Harvard, that is seen as a career boost and not a career ender.
Rog...
In my community, at least for pilots, it definitely is. 2 years of NOB fitreps is the kiss of death.
 

HeyJoe

Fly Navy! ...or USMC
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
For aviators, to go to grad school AS a shore duty is basically a career ender.
My relief in Pentagon opted to go to Monterey (NPS) after that tour and was sent to Pax River as payback where he became an AEDO and eventually the F/A-18 P. He is now in a rare second major program PM job (Presidential Helo). He was just selected for flag on last board so it was not a career ender for him, it opened an entirely new career path.
 

phrogdriver

More humble than you would understand
pilot
Super Moderator
There are always exceptions to the rule. For example, LtGen Amos left the Marines for a few years to fly for Braniff until they went belly-up, then rejoined. The point is, deviations from the "normal" career path are doable, but you will be working with a handicap if you get back on the standard path, or proceed down the "alternate" path, e.g. acquisitions. Not good or bad, but a question of personal priorities.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
There are always exceptions to the rule. For example, LtGen Amos left the Marines for a few years to fly for Braniff until they went belly-up, then rejoined. The point is, deviations from the "normal" career path are doable, but you will be working with a handicap if you get back on the standard path, or proceed down the "alternate" path, e.g. acquisitions. Not good or bad, but a question of personal priorities.
Part of my point was that from what I have seen, it is not necessarily a 'deviation from normal' for the Navy. I obviously can't speak for the Marines, but from what I have seen NPS was bascially a 'neutral' for most people's careers. What mattered was if you were good or bad going in and if you did a 'normal' tour afterwards.

Fellowship programs and special deals like Olmstead and others are often considered a plus. The 'golden boy' in my squadron, actually a good guy, did a fellowship program that included grad school for a second tour. It was definitely considered a plus.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top