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Deja Vu - the Mega oft-repeated question: Differences Between USMC and Naval Aviation

revan1013

Death by Snoo Snoo
pilot
And the mighty hammer of the mods has struck! Maybe we can do this for all those recurring questions.

I think we should have a popup show up to every new registered user, blacks out the background, flashes, and has a FAQ link to the questions no one wants to answer ever again on this site.

Google/search seems to be too hard.
 

flaps

happy to be here
None
Contributor
i would guess the attrition rate is a bit higher for marine ocs than for the navy ocs.
haven't checked any data.
also, the navy guys don't have to worry about getting orders to the grunts as a FAC.
 

ebcarlson23

New Member
Not to be that guy to ask a dumb question, or revive a dead thread, but I've asked a fair number of pilots (mostly ANG and Navy, one USMC helo pilot) for advice on which service to join to fly (regardless of airframe), and an answer I've heard repeated was "You'll know if the Marines are for you." I'm not really sure the Marines are for me, but I really like the "every Marine a rifleman" concept. Has anyone on here not been sure about the Corps, and joined anyways? I'm thinking of doing PLC next summer, as I'll be a freshman at Iowa State this fall. Thanks!
 

phrogdriver

More humble than you would understand
pilot
Super Moderator
PLC doesn't have a commitment until one accepts his commission. Then one incurs the obligation de jour. I think it's 4 years initially, then it's the standard winging obligation, if one goes air.
 

81montedriver

Well-Known Member
pilot
PLC doesn't have a commitment until one accepts his commission. Then one incurs the obligation de jure. I think it's 4 years initially, then it's the standard winging obligation, if one goes air.
It's the same with OCC. What got me interested initially were two things- guarenteed aviation contract and I didn't have to accept my commission until the end of OCS. If I went through OCS and figured out it wasn't for me, no big deal. At least I would have had the satisfaction of trying rather than joining another service and always wishing I had tried.

Now that I'm in, I wonder where the aviation part of my job is sometimes as I'm stuck behind a desk all day because 2/3 of my squadron is deployed.
 

Pepe

If it's stupid but works, it isn't stupid.
pilot
I don't think I would base my decision to go Marines on OCS, it's a school-house fantasy world.

Something else that might help your decision would be to ask yourself if you enjoy doing more with less. If you like having the tools for the job, join the Navy or USAF. Simple as that. (Also, USMC admin sucks. Really bad. Expect to have to talk to your S-1 or IPAC several times a year because they complete F'ed your orders/pay/TAD/ect.)
 

Kaman

Beech 1900 pilot's; "Fly it like you stole it"
Typically, your meal is served on a mess deck, you sleep in a nice clean bunk, showers everyday...and, LIBERTY! Marines definitely rough it a lot more than their Navy brethren, and they have my HIGHEST RESPECT for doing very tough and dangerous flying!
 

Tyler Houston

Not that new of a member
Understood, thank you. Would you feel obligated to mention to your other recruiter that you're dropping multiple apps or just keep it to yourself? I was under the impression that when applying for an OCS and flight contract, especially if you have to go to an interview, that you must exhibit a passion/dedication/desire for said branch. Wouldn't seem to convincing if you would just as easily accept another commission. Maybe I'm off on this one, just speculating...
Nobody ever answered this guy's question. I am quite curious because I am in contact with both the Marines and Navy and am about to begin the application process with both branches. Can I really submit a package for both branches and choose one assuming both accept me? I know that's a big assumption but a guy can dream a little.
 

croakerfish

Well-Known Member
pilot
Nobody ever answered this guy's question. I am quite curious because I am in contact with both the Marines and Navy and am about to begin the application process with both branches. Can I really submit a package for both branches and choose one assuming both accept me? I know that's a big assumption but a guy can dream a little.
Sure, I got accepted by the Navy and the Air Force in the same week.
 

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
None
Contributor
Nobody ever answered this guy's question. I am quite curious because I am in contact with both the Marines and Navy and am about to begin the application process with both branches. Can I really submit a package for both branches and choose one assuming both accept me? I know that's a big assumption but a guy can dream a little.

That question has been asked and answered ad nauseam. Yes you can.
 

Tyler Houston

Not that new of a member
That question has been asked and answered ad nauseam. Yes you can.
The way it was explained to me by an OSO was that I would sign a contract right before my package went before the boards. The contract would say that if I was selected, then I would be going to OCS with that branch. Is this not the case?
 

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
None
Contributor
The way it was explained to me by an OSO was that I would sign a contract right before my package went before the boards. The contract would say that if I was selected, then I would be going to OCS with that branch. Is this not the case?

You don't have to go if you are selected. I was in the process with the Navy, Marine Corps and Air National Guard. The Marine Corps gave me the first opportunity so I went with them.
 
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