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Computing NSS Quesstimate

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
You threw out some pretty good gouge, and VT-6 is holding pretty steady. I finished there almost a year ago with a 1.18 and a 59 NSS.
 

Erin M.

Active Member
pilot
You threw out some pretty good gouge, and VT-6 is holding pretty steady. I finished there almost a year ago with a 1.18 and a 59 NSS.
Had a buddy a few months ago finish with nearly the exact same scores as well.

A lot of the long-time instructors are moving on though, so I bet the average will shift in a few months.
 

e6bflyer

Used to Care
pilot
So, for everyone trying to figure out what you have, you just aren't going to be able to accurately predict your final result.
This

There are too many unknown variables.
And this are the only good pieces of advice in all that rambling on.

SNAs have been trying to crack the code since Theo "Spuds" Ellyson was in primary. It still hasn't happened.
 

Python1287

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
If you want to know why don't you just ask stucon like I did (and everybody else I knew in corpus that wanted to know)?
 

jtmedli

Well-Known Member
pilot
For those that don't know what we're talking about:

Leaves Alaska when his mom gets imprisoned for a parole violation.
Meets his father for the first time his senior year in high school.
Father commits suicide a year later.
Receives appointments to both USNA and USAFA. Chooses USNA.
One week before graduating from high school as valedictorian, gets hit by a drunk driver.
Denied acceptance to USNA because of injuries from the crash.
Goes to Ga Teach for a year.
Goes to USNA.
Multi-year starter on the football team.
BS in Aerospace Engineering with a > 3.0 QPR.
Selected to be the Brigade Commander for the second semester of his 1/c year.
Commissions as a Marine, and most importantly...

Is honored with the privilege of being the final new Phrog pilot in the USMC.

Yeah, I could have just said it was mind boggling that he was a football player who became Brigade Commander (that doesn't happen very often), but it wouldn't encapsulate how strong of character he is. Oh, and he spends his time on leave as an inspirational speaker helping kids. So yeah, he's a rockstar.

Sweet Jesus. Well-played.
 

Napper

Diggin' the PNW
pilot
T-6 studs in Corpus are plugging along with no solid reference group for squadron averages... Just to beat the shit out of a long-dead horse, what is a decent ballpark for ratios from contacts that lead to a final 1.15-1.18? I understand RI's and forms are going to make or break the final score, but what are some numbers from Whiting grads? I'm watching MIFs come up and my average plummet in PA's... I think I'm doing well, just kind of curious how hard of a hit I'm taking here.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
It's all relative grasshopper. Scores in other commands don't mean shit...only how you rank against your peers. Try asking your bros how they are doing and go from there.
 

FlyBoyd

Out to Pasture
pilot
...only how you rank against your peers...
This may have been said somewhere before but I'll say it again...

With a new syllabus, CNATRA makes a phantom pool of completers with made up NSSs....50 if I remember correctly. You are compared to that. You and your squadron peers change that pool and replace them as you go. By this point the numbers are made up by referencing the other squadrons that fly the same syllabus i.e. Whiting. So if the big heads that created the numbers were off, you get screwed or hooked up depending if they guessed high or low. The very first studs in the very first T-6 squadron were screwed/hooked up the worst. You...not so much. BUT...unless your IPs follow the example data set's grading trends, there will be differences.

You can't control it. Don't nuke it to death. Do the best you can day-to-day.

Oh....and don't suck.
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
This may have been said somewhere before but I'll say it again...

With a new syllabus, CNATRA makes a phantom pool of completers with made up NSSs....50 if I remember correctly. You are compared to that. You and your squadron peers change that pool and replace them as you go. By this point the numbers are made up by referencing the other squadrons that fly the same syllabus i.e. Whiting. So if the big heads that created the numbers were off, you get screwed or hooked up depending if they guessed high or low. The very first studs in the very first T-6 squadron were screwed/hooked up the worst. You...not so much. BUT...unless your IPs follow the example data set's grading trends, there will be differences.

You can't control it. Don't nuke it to death. Do the best you can day-to-day.

Oh....and don't suck.
Early classes for all the squadrons fresh from transition had it a little rough but the real variation seemed to come when they un anchored a squadrons NSS.
 

SkywardET

Contrarian
You can't control it. Don't nuke it to death. Do the best you can day-to-day.

Oh....and don't suck.
Definitely good advice!


You definitely have an influence on your grades, but I'm pretty sure NSS is as much fate-driven as it is derived from performance. If your onwing is the most notorious low-grader in the entire wing, then you're probably hosed. Also, if you get a bunch of incomplete flights due to weather or whatever, you're possibly in much worse shape than others who were luckier. Conversely, if your onwing is Santa Claus and you're an average performer, you'll be in great shape for an above-average NSS. If more of your sims are done with the Four Horsemen vice the other sim instructors than average, that's a potentially large negative influence on your NSS, etc.

(Four Horsemen survival tip: study way more than normal for a sim; i.e. know how to tune in and identify a VOR for early Contact sims.)
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
If you get a lot of incomplete flights due to weather, it may also be because some of your IPs care about getting you into the cockpit so you can actually continue learning to fly instead of sitting on the ground for another day and forgetting how to fly. :rolleyes:
 

Lucky3

P-8 Driver
pilot
Early classes for all the squadrons fresh from transition had it a little rough but the real variation seemed to come when they un anchored a squadrons NSS.

There is a lot of truth to this. I was one of the first few studs in a VT squadron to complete the T-6 syllabus and a friend who finished from the same squadron a year later finished with the same multiple (1.17 or .18 I think) and his NSS was 10 points higher than mine.
 
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