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What are you reading?

Recovering LSO

Suck Less
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Dr Jim Holmes (PhD) is a crazy smart and incredibly nice guy who hangs his hat up in Newport. This is his summer reading list. It got me thinking that we might be able to kickstart a thread here where we drop some book recommendations and thoughts on something you've recently read.

No, it's not AirWarriors Book Club.... It's different, dammit!

This one is actually on his list, and I just picked it up a week or so ago. So far, so so so good!
tincan.jpg

Also, just finished this. I had no idea how large of a role King and Leahy played in the larger global strategy development during WWII. It polishes USNA's knob pretty hard, but overall a really good book.

admirals.jpg

I realize neither of these books are "hot off the press," and many of you have probably read them. I had not.

I'm interested to see what else you guys are reading. Well... All except @webmaster. We know what he's reading.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Great idea!

I just started Shattered Sword - The "untold" story of the Battle of Midway. So far, it's a bit over the top in the amount of detail the author presents, but it's supposed to be good, so I'll stick with it.

Have recently read, and would recommend:
Longitude - Detailing the 18th century quest to find a means of determining one's longitude while navigating. Fascinating stuff and a quick read.

The Righteous Mind - Another great Jonathan Haidt book on the psychological and evolutionary influences that lead to people's various moral, ethical and religious thoughts. I would recommend all of his stuff.

American Nations - A history of the 11 regional ethnographic cultures (Puritans, NY Dutch, Tidewater Aristocracy, etc) that first settled the East Coast and how they migrated westward in different ways and how their cultural influences persist today. I don't think you can truly understand American culture without reading this book. Amazing work.

Also, anything by Jared Diamond
 

villanelle

Nihongo dame desu
Contributor
A few favorites of the last couple years--

Andy Weir's The Martian. Clever, funny, unusual. It's about a guy left behind alone on a Mars mission gone bad, what he must to do survive, and how he copes. I know, I know. It doesn't sounds funny, but it is.

A re-read of The Most Human Human: What Artificial Intelligence Teaches Us About Being Alive. The author is preparing to serve as human message sender in the Turing Test. As part of that, he explores what makes us human, what humans can do that AI can't, how the brain works, and a number of fascinating subjects. Dense read, but so very worth it.

And though I read it a couple years ago, Ready Player One is well worth the read.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Keep at Shattered Sword. Maybe I'm just a nerd, but the author managed to actually make IJN deck cycles interesting.
 

Hopeful Hoya

Well-Known Member
Contributor
In the middle of Guns, Germs, and Steel right now, definitely not a light read but pretty interesting.
Had to read that in high school. Great book, will definitely change your perspective on things, but by God did I want to gouge my eyes out with a spoon while reading it.
 

webmaster

The Grass is Greener!
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
Andy Weir's The Martian. Clever, funny, unusual. It's about a guy left behind alone on a Mars mission gone bad, what he must to do survive, and how he copes. I know, I know. It doesn't sounds funny, but it is.
I enjoyed that book, so much that I went back and read it again. Robin Crusoe theme and how this guy handles the engineering and survival challenges of being left behind and thought dead. I doubt the upcoming movie release in November will do it justice.

And though I read it a couple years ago, Ready Player One is well worth the read.
This keeps coming up on my kindle list and for one reason or another I keep passing on it. Maybe I should give it a read.

The Barefoot Spirit: How Hardship, Hustle and Heart Built America's #1 Wine Brand. This was on the reading list for my MBA, and I found it to be an interesting view into the challenges associated with a startup and distribution in the USA. A good look at their entrepreneurship, failures and successes.

And recently I have gone back through some of John Scalzi's books, Old Man's War, Human Division and waiting for his new book The End of All Things.

It's usually a downloaded copy of the USA Today on my Ipad or Sudoku :D
 

villanelle

Nihongo dame desu
Contributor
I enjoyed that book, so much that I went back and read it again. Robin Crusoe theme and how this guy handles the engineering and survival challenges of being left behind and thought dead. I doubt the upcoming movie release in November will do it justice.

This keeps coming up on my kindle list and for one reason or another I keep passing on it. Maybe I should give it a read.

The Barefoot Spirit: How Hardship, Hustle and Heart Built America's #1 Wine Brand. This was on the reading list for my MBA, and I found it to be an interesting view into the challenges associated with a startup and distribution in the USA. A good look at their entrepreneurship, failures and successes.

And recently I have gone back through some of John Scalzi's books, Old Man's War, Human Division and waiting for his new book The End of All Things.

It's usually a downloaded copy of the USA Today on my Ipad or Sudoku :D

Ready Player One is being made into a movie as well, though it's a ways out. Spielberg is directing. I worry about what he'll do with it. Much of it takes places in a virtual world, which can be touchy.

I don't know how old you are, but if you grew up in the 80s, RP1 is probably an even better suggestion. Especially if you were at all in to video games, or 80s pop culture. I wasn't/am on, but I still loved it. There are tons of 80s references though. I don't think being an 80s child or a video game player is necessary to enjoying it, however.

I'm currently in a reading slump and don't know how to get out of it. Lots of crap lately.
 

webmaster

The Grass is Greener!
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
I don't know how old you are, but if you grew up in the 80s, RP1 is probably an even better suggestion. ...... I'm currently in a reading slump and don't know how to get out of it. Lots of crap lately.
Grew up in the 80s and finished that decade (cough) in high school, so I am sure I will get those references. I downloaded RP1 onto my kindle, so it's all set for my next trip. I browsed through Barnes and Noble the other day, and nothing really caught my eye, so I will echo the reading slump commentary. Probably why I have gone back and reread some of my books lately, that and I was on MBA burnout from a couple research and analysis papers! Tomorrow starts the summer term, digital marketing and financial analysis, joy... sigh (obviously I didn't think the first year at the airlines would be enough for me so I decided to take on graduate studies also!).
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
I just got done with this book, it was a bit of a slog at times because it went into great detail on a lot of individual rescues one after another but it was a very good history of CSAR from WWI to present day.

 
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jmcquate

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Just started Gordon Rhea's 4 volumes on Grant's Overland Campaign. Trench warfare in it's infancy.
 
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