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Ultimate Fitness Thread

Meyerkord

Primary
I have not yet been to OCS, but I have heard that if the weather is bad you run it indoors in a gym. I think doing that would cause you to run slower than usual. Tighter turns tire your legs out faster.
It's true that you run indoors if the weather is bad. Depending on the time of year, it may be a good or bad thing. I was there in the winter time, and being inside meant not freezing my ass off during a PRT ;) nothing worse than doing all that in sweats, hat, and gloves.
 

AULANI

Well-Known Member
All you 20-year olds are in the prime of your life. You should be killing it in the physical fitness department.
 
It's true that you run indoors if the weather is bad. Depending on the time of year, it may be a good or bad thing. I was there in the winter time, and being inside meant not freezing my ass off during a PRT ;) nothing worse than doing all that in sweats, hat, and gloves.
Oh yeah I’m from Texas so I would definitely rather be indoors than freezing haha. It’s probably still tougher to break 8:30 in the gym though.
 

Meyerkord

Primary
Oh yeah I’m from Texas so I would definitely rather be indoors than freezing haha. It’s probably still tougher to break 8:30 in the gym though.
Yeah, kinda. I think we had a few in our class get sub-9, but it's tough because the track is 2 narrow lanes and you gotta run 20 laps, so it gets crowded.
 

Seniuram

Well-Known Member
I was always picked last for stuff in gym, so I’ve had to play catch up lol.
Well, indoors your pushups and sit-ups don’t change. Really the only change is what you wear and it’s actually easier to cheat your form if you have a big baggy sweater on. The run however, outdoors I was pushin 9:00-9:15 but indoors I hit 10:30. I don’t think having wet shoes/socks helped much either from the walk over.
 
Good morning all. Checking in to see if any recent graduates are willing to show what running shoes were issued to them. For the life of me, I am unable to verify which version of the New Balances they are from the OTCN Newport Facebook pages (may be due to small screen and low resolution). I have been using/training in the 860 V9s as my assumed issued shoe for awhile now (which is classified as a stability shoe). I normally run in a neutral cushioned shoe for most of my training (currently using the Nike Peg 35 Turbos). Specifically, for neutral runners, are the 1080s or 880s issued? Thank you all for your continued help in my preparation.
 

Meyerkord

Primary
Good morning all. Checking in to see if any recent graduates are willing to show what running shoes were issued to them. For the life of me, I am unable to verify which version of the New Balances they are from the OTCN Newport Facebook pages (may be due to small screen and low resolution). I have been using/training in the 860 V9s as my assumed issued shoe for awhile now (which is classified as a stability shoe). I normally run in a neutral cushioned shoe for most of my training (currently using the Nike Peg 35 Turbos). Specifically, for neutral runners, are the 1080s or 880s issued? Thank you all for your continued help in my preparation.
I was issued these 1 year ago (to this date) at OCS. There were maybe 2 or 3 different kinds they give based on your foot profile.
 

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Seniuram

Well-Known Member
Good morning,
Thank you for your help! That confirms that the 860s are one of the issued shoes.
Fair warning, they put you on a machine that’s not accurate ran by people who don’t actually know how to use it so you get what you get. They measure your feet with confidence though, lots of confidence.
 
Fair warning, they put you on a machine that’s not accurate ran by people who don’t actually know how to use it so you get what you get. They measure your feet with confidence though, lots of confidence.
Thank you for the advice. Looking forward to it. Figure if I train with the heavier or more restrictive one, I should be good to go either way.
 
Alright figured I'd share some of my secrets of getting PFT/PRT fit. Previously I was working with the Marines Corps for about 5 years, so during that time I climbed to perfect 300 and repeated consecutively.

Running: 1.5 miles is considerably easy to max out, a very short distance. But here's how I would get there in all my experience training (20+ year soccer player as well). Start off doing a few days a week of just a mile or 2 miles if your body can handle it. Don't go in thinking you'll blow it away right away. Once you work up to being comfortable with the runs, start a 4-day running program. Give one day as your "recovery/distance" run (3 miles), gives you the chance to run at a leisurely pace, improve your endurance, and look at 1.5 like it's nothing. Next I would do a "splits" day, running 2 or maybe even 3 once you build up to it, of .75-1 mile trials, you will want to push very hard for these. 3rd Day is the "test day" where you should run a little over 1 mile (1.25) at 100%, I don't suggest 1.5 because that last bit missing adrenaline and hype will carry you through but it still gives you a good measure of your progress/pace. Lastly are INTERVALS! These help with pace tremendously, split it into 2 .5 mile sprint, 3 .25 mile sprints, and then 4 .13mile sprints. Rests are walking pace of 1/2 of what you sprinted.

Push Ups: I've used an awesome Pull Up program for the PFT when I was doing marines so I'm not as experienced or knowledge in this area. I'd recommend mirroring the Armstrong Pull Up Program, you do 3 max sets of push ups when you wake up, and rest at least 3 hours until you do the actual workout program. Go to work, do your day whatever, then do the actual program. Maybe you could even get away with doing 5 max sets at night if you don't feel like following a program, if you see progress then keep it up! Eventually you might "plateau" and I suggest adding weight on your back (vest/backpack filled with books will do). You will see your reps drop obviously, but when you take it off you WILL see gains.

Sit Ups (for now): I highly recommend following the Killer Crunch (Sit Ups in our case) plan. Abs should be most people's strongest point, so I usually give this training cycle the shortest amount of preparation before I know I will be taking a test.

Overall, consistency is key! Just take the 30 minutes everyday to knockout the body exercises, and the running program should also be quick as we are training for 1.5 miles, intervals being an exception. You WILL have shitty days, days you underperform and think wtf. Do not get flustered, I look at it as "if I didn't do this workout, I'd be even worse off so a minimal performance still goes into the bank of improvement as opposed to nothing." For all you gym buffs, who doesn't love to get big and lift heavy? Unfortunately that's not our game anymore, nothing wrong with keeping a heavy set in the mix, but you really should be looking at rep ranges at least 12+. Of course you will want to decrease set amounts as you're doing a much larger amount of reps. Also. REST is important! Listen to your body, if you are feeling tired or groggy carb load and make sure to get a solid 7. Every 8 weeks or so you should be taking the entire week off if you're following all my recommendations, overtraining is worse than not training. Can lead to injuries, sickness, loses in gains, etc.

I am not a fitness god nor do I know what exactly works for your body as everyone is different and variations of my program customized to your needs and bodily reactions is ok. But just my two cents, wanted to share as it got me from not even qualifying for minimal PFT standards to b2b2b2b 300 PFT scores.

If anyone would like to talk about programs further feel free to DM me!
 
Planks are extremely mental in my opinion and about proper form more than anything. "Stacking" is an acro-yoga term I've learned. Keep your elbows directly underneath your shoulders, keeps a straight line and takes unneeded stress off of your upper body as much as possible. Control your breathing and be calm. When you freak out you lose oxygen, and oxygen is needed to keep those muscles tight we are engaging. Find your Happy Gilmore, lock into that happy place and don't let it go. Close your eyes if you have to (if that's allowed?), lock in and get lost, and then when you feel like you can't do it anymore that's when you return to reality and play the mental game of "Ok let's push dude." I'm interested to see what the max or min is, I'd say if you can do 1 min 5/5 times right now you'd be in decent shape, but certainly should pick up a program to improve upon.

Maybe follow something similar to the Armstrong/killer crunch programs. Do a max set day, do a pyramid day, multiple 30-60 second (depending on current fitness) sessions, side planks day, and then pick your poison for the 5th?
 
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