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The Doctor is in! Ask a Flight Surgeon!

Question for any flight docs out there. I've talked to mine but want to make sure the gouge I'm getting is accurate. I'm a first tour pilot in the VFA community. My vision has been steadily degrading for the past few years, and is now very close to the uncorrected vision limit for Service Group 1 (SG1) of 20/100. When flying, I wear glasses that correct to 20/20. I want to have a clear idea of what the different contingencies are if my vision continues to degrade. From a quick look at the NAMI waiver guide, it seems like the 20/100 uncorrected number applies only to SG1, which is required for shipboard landings. SG2 allows for an uncorrected acuity of 20/200. Couple questions out of this:

The waiver guide says “A waiver unaided for visual acuity less than standards may be considered in designated individuals, provided the central and peripheral retina is normal and all other visual standards are met (including best corrected visual acuity). Visual acuity and refractive error standards are generally not waived for applicants of any class.” I’m not sure how to parse this – is this basically saying that waivers are technically possible, but in practice they will never happen? Has anyone heard of a waiver being granted in this case?

Per the waiver guide, SG1 status is required to make shipboard landings. If I do end up falling out of SG1 standards (but still within SG2, for which the limit is 20/200), can I still fly in my squadron provided we are not embarked? Would I be able to fly in a shore-based command? Would greatly appreciate any input on this.
 

FinkUFreaky

Well-Known Member
pilot
Question for any flight docs out there. I've talked to mine but want to make sure the gouge I'm getting is accurate. I'm a first tour pilot in the VFA community. My vision has been steadily degrading for the past few years, and is now very close to the uncorrected vision limit for Service Group 1 (SG1) of 20/100. When flying, I wear glasses that correct to 20/20. I want to have a clear idea of what the different contingencies are if my vision continues to degrade. From a quick look at the NAMI waiver guide, it seems like the 20/100 uncorrected number applies only to SG1, which is required for shipboard landings. SG2 allows for an uncorrected acuity of 20/200. Couple questions out of this:

The waiver guide says “A waiver unaided for visual acuity less than standards may be considered in designated individuals, provided the central and peripheral retina is normal and all other visual standards are met (including best corrected visual acuity). Visual acuity and refractive error standards are generally not waived for applicants of any class.” I’m not sure how to parse this – is this basically saying that waivers are technically possible, but in practice they will never happen? Has anyone heard of a waiver being granted in this case?

Per the waiver guide, SG1 status is required to make shipboard landings. If I do end up falling out of SG1 standards (but still within SG2, for which the limit is 20/200), can I still fly in my squadron provided we are not embarked? Would I be able to fly in a shore-based command? Would greatly appreciate any input on this.
Can't speak to everything, but I do know there is more to it than just shipboard landings. Had a buddy at a VT squadron with similar issues, and it's required SG1 to be a VT instructor as well. There are other shore flying billets that are less competitive for career like station pilot etc that I believe if multi-piloted would allow for SG2.

I read that waiver statement as: if your only issue is unaided visual acuity, waivers can be granted. If you have refractive error standards or issues with aided visual acuity, there will be no waiver. I'm not 100% on this, and I don't even know what refractive error standards are, so take this for what it's worth... Someone who has dealt a lot with NAMI but not for vision lol.
 
Hey everyone! I am currently in NROTC and and an avid gym goer. I and planning on applying for SNA and SNFO in September for my service assignment. I was lifting recently and may have given myself a hernia while deadlifting. I am going to see my physician to have him check it out. If it is a Hernia, and I get it corrected will that affect my ability to get picked for aviation?
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
Just saw this and had a chuckle. My mom died of colon cancer when I was in my late twenties so I've been getting these things done for years now (I'm 69). The actual procedure is nothing at all, crap they even take vacation photos for you!:( It's the day before that I actually hate. Just remember chicken broth is your friend, it's okay to eat it the day before, but most doctors don't think of telling you that so you're just going to starve to death for 24 hours with what they tell you you're allowed to eat (which is practically nothing). Just ask the doc and he'll blink, smile, and say "sure chicken broth is okay." Oh and one more thing... make sure you're the first patient on the procedure day. That way you'll be able to scarf down real food by about 8 or so in the morning.
Recently returned from the probe and wanted to reiterate to get screening done as soon as eligible. Have 1 friend who waited several years beyond his 50th to have this done (fortunately no problems) and finally talked another into getting this done (he didn’t want the hassle but it is a very simple procedure). Colon cancer, like skin cancer, is one that can be detected early as long as you go to the doctor. I am hearing that doctors are now recommending earlier than 50 - possibly 45 or even 40.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
It's the day before that I actually hate. Just remember chicken broth is your friend, it's okay to eat it the day before, but most doctors don't think of telling you that so you're just going to starve to death for 24 hours
I figure the exact opposite. Head to Hoss' Hot Food Buffet (skip the salad) and feast until bursting, then sit down for a session with that gallon jug of radiator flush.

How many times in life can you eat as much as you want of whatever you want? 🐂🐂🐂
 

JMT865

Graduating: May 2022
NAVY PILOT/NFO Medical Qualifications.

I am going to MEPS in a few weeks. I am submitting a SNA/NFO package in June. At MEPS, does anybody have information regarding how medical waivers go? I had a few football injuries in high school (breaks, sprains, tears, etc.), but am fully functional now running, lifting weights, pushups, planks, etc.. I am sure I will get waivers for those past injuries and have no worries about that, but I am posting on here to see if anybody else has similar experiences when getting medically cleared for OCS and the pilot/NFO pipeline.

Also, I am aware that there are many medical physicals along the path to become a pilot or NFO that have the ability to disqualify somebody from continuing down that pipeline. How do these physicals go? And, what are physical ailments that disqualify people from, in the long run, going through and graduating from Flight Training? My vision exceeds 20/20 and hearing is not an issue, it is the past bone-breaks and ligament tears that I am mostly worried about. One of my breaks (R index finger) still has 3 very small screws in it, and I know any metalwork can be an issue.
 

JMT865

Graduating: May 2022
Hey everyone! I am currently in NROTC and and an avid gym goer. I and planning on applying for SNA and SNFO in September for my service assignment. I was lifting recently and may have given myself a hernia while deadlifting. I am going to see my physician to have him check it out. If it is a Hernia, and I get it corrected will that affect my ability to get picked for aviation?
No. All you need to do is fully recover (100%+++), get a statement from your physician/surgeon/nurse that you are fully functional and ready to go, and also get a medical waiver. With surgical recovery, though, this process might take a little bit longer for you.
 
No. All you need to do is fully recover (100%+++), get a statement from your physician/surgeon/nurse that you are fully functional and ready to go, and also get a medical waiver. With surgical recovery, though, this process might take a little bit longer for you.
Thank you for the response, luckily it wasn't a hernia, just a strain so I am still good to go!
 

NobleJ

SNA
Hey! I am wondering if anyone knows if NAMI is just reviewing flight physicals submitted to Aero on Thursday, or if they are reviewing multiple times a week because there is a back log of us folks who have graduated OCS in Newport waiting for our “Qualified” to get down to Pensacola? Thanks to anyone who might have insight!
 

Ordie

New Member
Is having a history of sleep apnea still disqualifying for SNA/SNFO if you no longer have to use a CPAP after quitting smoking and losing weight?
 

CaptMorgan

Well-Known Member
Hey everybody, I was just recently selected for SNA and had a question regarding NAMI. I have a current 2808 for my army pilot flight physical and it's uploaded in AERO. Since it's current, is there a possibility I could bypass NAMI or do the shortened version? Thanks again
 

Grapeape

Member
If there is a flight surgeon out there, I need your help. Please Dm me, I have a few nami questions.
Thank you
 
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