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Ruh Oh...

scoober78

(HCDAW)
pilot
Contributor

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Another story to make you realize that somewhere, someone in the Navy is having a worse day than you.
 

helolumpy

Region staff is the 7th level of hell!
pilot
Contributor
I heard from a sub driver that the fire was so hot that the hull plates were glowing.
The big concern was how can you verify the strength of an entire hull plate. You can only do so much NDI but you may never be able to certify the hull to be what it was before the fire.
 

MasterBates

Well-Known Member
Sub hulls probably don't react well to redneck heat treatment. At a minimum those plates got annealed, then probably a surface quench when the water form the hoses hit them.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
I heard from a sub driver that the fire was so hot that the hull plates were glowing.
The big concern was how can you verify the strength of an entire hull plate. You can only do so much NDI but you may never be able to certify the hull to be what it was before the fire.
Wonder what the cost/benefit is on just striking it. I'm sure the engineers will figure it out, the they've got to be thinking of the liability of putting it back into service with a hull that has been subjected to that kind of punishment. I presume the hulls are done in a modular fashion, but that's still quite an undertaking.
 

BusyBee604

St. Francis/Hugh Hefner Combo!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
I'm sure the engineers will figure it out, the they've got to be thinking of the liability of putting it back into service with a hull that has been subjected to that kind of punishment.
If they do decide to repair/refurbish, I wouldn't want to be aboard on the first dive to 'test depth'! I am fortunate that my number of career dive and surface totals are the same...;)
Patch Dolphins.gif
BzB
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Sub hulls probably don't react well to redneck heat treatment. At a minimum those plates got annealed, then probably a surface quench when the water form the hoses hit them.
Agreed, you don't want your hull plates deforming when exposed to depth pressure.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
I heard from a sub driver that the fire was so hot that the hull plates were glowing.
The big concern was how can you verify the strength of an entire hull plate. You can only do so much NDI but you may never be able to certify the hull to be what it was before the fire.
If they knew how hot the fire was and the length of exposure, they probably wouldn't even have to NDI it. I'd venture to say it's pretty muched fucked.
 

EM1toNFO

Killing insurgents with my 'messages'!!
None
I was at some fine Navy training there when it happened. They woke us up at 0200 to have a mando emer muster to make sure we didn't head down the block to "help out". Def crazy stuff!!
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
They can do some amazing stuff with fixing these submarines, if they can cut the nose off of the San Fran and replace it with another I am sure they can fix the Miami, the question is "is this cost effective"
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
They can do some amazing stuff with fixing these submarines, if they can cut the nose off of the San Fran and replace it with another I am sure they can fix the Miami, the question is "is this cost effective"
As I understand it, the only reason they kept San Fran was because they had recently dropped all that coin on the refueling and it would have been a bigger waste to go through the scrapping/disposal of the nuclear reactor process.
 

scoober78

(HCDAW)
pilot
Contributor
My educated guess would be, that since it's one of the older 688i's that it all comes down to EFPH remaining on the core. If it's early in life, it may well be worth salvaging....if it isn't, that cost will put it over the reasonable cost threshold to operate and she'll be struck.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
My biggest disappointment (aside from losing half a submarine) is how the media portrayed the Submariners as needing to be saved by the local fire depts. Of course, media recognition is not why we do this, but at least have the courtesy to not make the crew out to be helpless souls who needed to be rescued.

If the hull passes testing and can withstand a dive, she will be repaired. If not, they will explore whether to make her a prototype or to scrap her. Nothing is confirmed, but the first option is looking optimistic.
 
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