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Retirement/Retiree Gouge Forum?

SynixMan

Space Cadet
pilot
Contributor
HJ, that forum disappeared some time ago. Not sure why, but it's no longer viewable (at least that I can find). However, here's a new Retiree forum, as requested. Please let me know if you're running into issues posting.

I think it was turned into the Help Wanted...?
 

michael odell

New Member
I've scoured around and haven't been able to find exactly what my situation would be, figured I'd ask some old retired guys.

As of right now I'm an E-6 at 16 years enlisted AWO in the Navy, joined in 2004. I am going to be submitting an OCS package for Intel. I understand the time wickets for retirement, 20 years active and 10 commissioned and 2 at the highest rank. My questions is if I get selected will I have to do 10 years as an Officer to get any Officer retirement pay? I've been told that I will still be eligible for the "high three" retirement in which I'll still be able to get officer retirement. But I've also had some tell me that if I don't do 10 years as an Officer I wont get any Officer retirement pay and will revert to my current E-6 retirement pay.

Any sage wisdom would be greatly appreciated as this decision holds quite a lot of weight for my family and I and my current and future career goals. Thanks in advance.
 

HSMPBR

Not a misfit toy
pilot
My perception is one would go to a commissioning source to start a second career. What is your career goal? Do you want to stay in the navy for 27 years? If not, are you doing this to get higher-level management and job experience (plus pay) to set yourself up for your next career? Why not just do that with an entry-level job and E-6 (if you don’t get selected for E-7) retirement? Have you thought about sticking it out to 20 while pursuing further education/certification for your next career with the navy’s money?

There will be some MSR for commissioning into intel (5 years?), and I suppose you can get out after that and retire as an E-6 but have a few years of higher pay and a resume booster. It’ll still take you past 20.
 

ea6bflyr

Working Class Bum
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
I've scoured around and haven't been able to find exactly what my situation would be, figured I'd ask some old retired guys.

As of right now I'm an E-6 at 16 years enlisted AWO in the Navy, joined in 2004. I am going to be submitting an OCS package for Intel. I understand the time wickets for retirement, 20 years active and 10 commissioned and 2 at the highest rank. My questions is if I get selected will I have to do 10 years as an Officer to get any Officer retirement pay? I've been told that I will still be eligible for the "high three" retirement in which I'll still be able to get officer retirement. But I've also had some tell me that if I don't do 10 years as an Officer I wont get any Officer retirement pay and will revert to my current E-6 retirement pay.

Any sage wisdom would be greatly appreciated as this decision holds quite a lot of weight for my family and I and my current and future career goals. Thanks in advance.
Yes, 10 years of commissioned service is the requirement. DOPMA/ROPMA Reference.
10 U.S. Code § 3911, § 6323, and § 8911: Regular and reserve officers in the Armed Forces may retire after 20 years of service, at least 10 of which must have been as an active commissioned officer.
 

michael odell

New Member
My perception is one would go to a commissioning source to start a second career. What is your career goal? Do you want to stay in the navy for 27 years? If not, are you doing this to get higher-level management and job experience (plus pay) to set yourself up for your next career? Why not just do that with an entry-level job and E-6 (if you don’t get selected for E-7) retirement? Have you thought about sticking it out to 20 while pursuing further education/certification for your next career with the navy’s money?

There will be some MSR for commissioning into intel (5 years?), and I suppose you can get out after that and retire as an E-6 but have a few years of higher pay and a resume booster. It’ll still take you past 20.
Right now I'm already planning on going to 22. I'm currently working on getting my bachelors then masters in electrical engineering. I'd really like to work as an engineer when I get out but also would love to earn a commission and am trying to do what's best for my family in the long run. Hence why I was curious about the retirement. I wouldnt mind doing 27+ years in the navy especially as an officer but that basicslly means giving up the dream of engineering at that point. I'm a little worried about getting hired for engineering anyways at 22 years in the navy I'll be 40 trying to compete with younger guys who most likely have engineering experience which is a big part of getting hired.
 

Pags

Pope of Chili Town
pilot
Right now I'm already planning on going to 22. I'm currently working on getting my bachelors then masters in electrical engineering. I'd really like to work as an engineer when I get out but also would love to earn a commission and am trying to do what's best for my family in the long run. Hence why I was curious about the retirement. I wouldnt mind doing 27+ years in the navy especially as an officer but that basicslly means giving up the dream of engineering at that point. I'm a little worried about getting hired for engineering anyways at 22 years in the navy I'll be 40 trying to compete with younger guys who most likely have engineering experience which is a big part of getting hired.
Depends on whether you want to be a "working" engineer or a "management" engineer.
 

taxi1

Well-Known Member
pilot
Yes, 10 years of commissioned service is the requirement. DOPMA/ROPMA Reference.
So what happens when you retire with 9 years commissioned? Roll back to E6 pay?

I looked for it, and it was never 100% clear on that. In reading it, it kind of alluded to you not being able to voluntarily retire, which of course doesn't make sense.
 

ea6bflyr

Working Class Bum
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
So what happens when you retire with 9 years commissioned? Roll back to E6 pay?

I looked for it, and it was never 100% clear on that. In reading it, it kind of alluded to you not being able to voluntarily retire, which of course doesn't make sense.
Great question. It appears that there is currently a waiverable 8 year min according to the NAVADMIN. But the waivers are based on needs of the Navy, timing, and service retention. The Retirement page on BUPERS is pretty helpful and I've had previous luck speaking with "little old ladies in white tennis shoes" by calling. I asked about final retirement percentage with 28 years and 8 months of service...btw, it's 71.45% if you're wondering.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
What happens when a prior E retires with less than 10 years commissioned service?

I think what happens is you get E6 on your retired ID card, your retirement pay is based on your top 3 years- which would be as an O3 but what happens after that is a few years later some pay elf in a basement in Cleveland notices your retirement pay is kinda high for a retired E6, hand jams a bunch of numbers to what he/she thinks your pay is supposed to be, and without telling you deducts the excess from your next several pay periods.
 

michael odell

New Member
So what happens when you retire with 9 years commissioned? Roll back to E6 pay?

I looked for it, and it was never 100% clear on that. In reading it, it kind of alluded to you not being able to voluntarily retire, which of course doesn't make sense.
That was exactly what I was looking for. The what happens if you don't hit 10 years. I have a few prior enlisted officers I work with that said that you revert back to 1 rank above what you were before you commissioned. So an E6 would end up getting E7 retirement pay. The high 3 only applies if you hit the 10 year mark, again if you don't, high 3 doesn't apply.
 
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