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Pre-OCS PRT suspended?

GreenLantern330

Active Member
Maybe enlisted guys do better in bootcamp without a a pre-bootcamp PRT than officers and OCS because they're usually younger. IMO OC's are usually right out of college or a few years after college where they sometimes haven't been taking care of themselves (or just let themselves go) and aren't in the best shape as they are in high school. I think a pre-OCS PRT would be beneficial but I'm just a civvy so I have no experiences to go off.
 

AllAmerican75

Back to School!
None
...without the need to do a 30-day pre-OCS PRT (and for us BDCP guys, another one before then in April) there would be no immediate incentive for us to really work out before then. It sounds crazy, but without the looming failure on an upcoming PRT I tend to not push myself as hard as I should in the meantime, and I would not get in decent enough shape in time.
Not to make things personal, but I think anyone who isn't currently pushing themselves physically in order to be ready for the hell that will be OCS, deserves whatever they get. Ever since I found out I was pro rec'd, I've been pushing myself in the gym and on the road. Having been through a similar environment while at VMI, my opinion is that big boy/girl rules should apply.
 

Jim123

DD-214 in hand and I'm gonna party like it's 1998
pilot
Should we, uh, merge this thread with the Pennsylvania/NFL Football/snowstorm/nation of wussies thread?
 

NTXRockr

Alive and kicking...sort of.
Should we, uh, merge this thread with the Pennsylvania/NFL Football/snowstorm/nation of wussies thread?
LOL, I couldn't believe that either but at least their reasoning was that emergency vehicles would not be able to respond effectively if something happened at the stadium if they were dispatched away, and vice versa. I understand it, but still think they should have played the game regardless of who could have made it or not.

As far as being personal, I still pass the requirements with a Good-Low or higher (much higher on P/Us and S/Us, still dealing w) but I could be in outstanding shape with some "positive reinforcement" to encourage me to push myself harder and further. Whether that's a battle-buddy to workout with or a gunny to "encourage" me, I perform better in a group than I do by myself. I'll be good to go come July (my OCS date), but I'd rather be in that shape now and even better by then. The only thing that really keeps me here now is the biannual PRTs and indoc PRT we have to do, otherwise I'd likely procrastinate and put it off until May. If they had some sort of PT requirement that we had to attend weekly, etc, I'd be up for it as that would help even more to prevent sub-par candidates. In years past when I've got back in shape I usually tend to maintain it on my own, it's just the initial push to get over the out-of-shape phase. Some people naturally tend to stay in shape, some cannot do it, and some (like me) like to be in shape but tend to fall off the wagon every now and then and need some help to get back on.
 

SC-NY-88

FNG
None
^ You're more than welcome to come to NY and run with me :) . You better be in shape for July.

I agree with AllAmerican75 that its really a "big boy" thing. This is your career we are talking about, you should do everything in your power to make it as successful as possible. I can see why the Navy is worried about liability for civilians injuring themselves or worse, dying during PRTs (even though we sign hold harmless agreements) especially in today's world where people sue for a stubbed toe.

I also agree that incentives like PRTs can help, but ultimately it's up to the candidate to push themselves. Bottom line, I don't know about you but I'll be in th best shape of my life before OCS...that is until OCS when the beatings begin.
 

NTXRockr

Alive and kicking...sort of.
^ You're more than welcome to come to NY and run with me :) . You better be in shape for July.
Maybe when it gets a little warmer and not so much white stuff on the ground lol.

The only reason I'm currently not in tip-top shape is because I pulled my achilles' tendon back in July. I've finally rehabbed it enough to the point I was able to run a 1.5 last week...this is from the point of wearing a walking boot and hobbling around with excruciating pain from my wedding in August until Christmas. At that time in July, I was running a high 10/low 11 minute 1.5 and doing around 70pu and 90su, as well as getting my weight back under control and plenty of room under the limit, but due to a rainy day and a sneaky pothole I rolled my ankle bad. Even doing healthy food and no/low carb diets and any workouts I could attempt on one leg, I still am stuck at about 7-10lbs overweight. Now that I'm back on my feet (haha!) I plan on getting this taken care of ASAP...with luck I'll be at least 10-15lbs underweight and running without issues by the time graduation comes around.
 

SC-NY-88

FNG
None
Yeah, we just got another 18 inches, starting to feel like I live in Minnesota.

Sorry to hear that, ankle rolls are the worst, I had a serious one way back in the day in High School, I ran half over a curb in the dark, not smart. Good the hear you're "back on your feet", I'm sure no matter what we do we still won't be 'ready' for OCS, as I understand it, you never are.
 

ahernandez

New Member
Regardless of if there is no PRT with your recruiter, you should show up to OCS in TOP physical condition. My only guess is that they want to prevent injury before OCS, but you should make YOURSELF test YOURSELF on the PRT. Go out to a track and practice the PRT a few times. One thing that helps me is to run with our ROTC groups/soccer clubs at college. Engage yourself and motivate yourself; you're going to a leadership school and you should already have the basics to becoming a leader, one quality of which is to initiate things yourself.

Shoes shouldn't matter. Though you want to show up to OCS with a quality pair of shoes, the best training I've ever done in my life is barefoot on either a track or on ground (that obviously isn't littered with glass as this could cause problems). It'll hurt the hell out of your calfs and feet, but the conditioning will toughen you up to be able to run and perform in any condition and with any quality shoes.

If anyone is worried about shin splints coming up again at OCS, I've been told they probably will. I would talk to your recruiter and have your date pushed back because you don't want to get there, get injured, and spend 6+ months there in holding company.

Bottom line: run. run a lot. 3+ miles 4 days per week to get ready. Don't just slow pace it either, vary your workouts up with sprints, winders, and long stretches of hills. You want to be prepared for EVERYTHING. Don't go into it with the attitude that "just barely passing" is still passing. THis is your chance for the DIs to test you, but it's also your chance to test YOURSELF.
 

NTXRockr

Alive and kicking...sort of.
One thing that helps me is to run with our ROTC groups/soccer clubs at college.

Shoes shouldn't matter. Though you want to show up to OCS with a quality pair of shoes, the best training I've ever done in my life is barefoot on either a track or on ground (that obviously isn't littered with glass as this could cause problems). It'll hurt the hell out of your calfs and feet, but the conditioning will toughen you up to be able to run and perform in any condition and with any quality shoes.


If anyone is worried about shin splints coming up again at OCS, I've been told they probably will. I would talk to your recruiter and have your date pushed back because you don't want to get there, get injured, and spend 6+ months there in holding company.
I thought about meeting up with some of the AFROTC or Army ROTC guys at school or asking the commanding officers if I could take part in their PT labs. I was advised not to as it could cause issues or liability if I re-injured my achilles, etc. It's one thing to workout on my own or with the NRD, but if something did happen the ROTC guys couldn't be held liable.

As far as barefoot running, a lot of us have been interested in or now using the Vibrams Fingers running shoes, which simulate barefoot running. I looked into running with these back in July around the time I got hurt, as well as trying them out in December. My only concern is that they would overwork my calves and tendon to where I again re-injure it. Most people (i.e. those in good running shape already) claim that they kill your legs for the first month or so while you relearn how to run, so I can only imagine what would happen if I tried them with a still-weak heel since it really works out the calves and heels. Once I'm back in stride running again and after OCS I'll probably look into them again, but I'd rather recoup with normal shoes and be in decent shape before trying something new and screwing it up further.
 

SC-NY-88

FNG
None
Intersting you should mention running with ROTC guys. I just started doing that, I didn't get the impression I was a liability or anything, I'm more or less running and working out NEXT to them, not as a PART of them. The sergeant writes down my times for me and what not but I think its mutually understood that I'm there of my own choice. Id be doing pretty much the same workouts regardless, this just gives me someone to pace in my runs and things like that. I havn't run it by my OR yet, so we'll see what he says.
 

Ezekiel

Falling, with style
None
I guess it's a unit by unit thing. The CO of the NROTC at school called my OR and got the names of all the BDCP candidates at my school and called us in one by one to explain why we hadn't already asked to join the unit in PT and labs. I ended up not doing stuff with them, but when another candidate went in, he found the CO of our NRD sitting in the office. He was "very excited" about the prospect of BDCP candidates working with the NROTC. YMMV.
 

twobecrazy

RTB...
Contributor
When I was still in school and found out I was Pro-Rec'd for NFO my schools NROTC program wanted nothing to do with me. They claimed liability issues. I understood and continued to workout on my own.
 

eas7888

Looking forward to some P-8 action
pilot
Contributor
When I was still in school and found out I was Pro-Rec'd for NFO my schools NROTC program wanted nothing to do with me. They claimed liability issues. I understood and continued to workout on my own.
As a member of the BDCP, there shouldn't be any sort of liability issue, as you are an enlisted member of the Navy. It is no different than any other enlisted member taking part in PT. As a PRO-REC, I understand there might be some liability issues, and even with a FS letter in hand, I can still understand the issues, as you're not technically being paid yet. Not a bad idea to get involved with an organized PT group, but if you can't, just bust your ass that much harder to get ready, I suppose.
 

twobecrazy

RTB...
Contributor
As a member of the BDCP, there shouldn't be any sort of liability issue, as you are an enlisted member of the Navy. It is no different than any other enlisted member taking part in PT. As a PRO-REC, I understand there might be some liability issues, and even with a FS letter in hand, I can still understand the issues, as you're not technically being paid yet. Not a bad idea to get involved with an organized PT group, but if you can't, just bust your ass that much harder to get ready, I suppose.
I'm going back to the old Aircrew/RSS PT program with a side dose of P90X. I should be just fine! ;)
 

SC-NY-88

FNG
None
As a member of the BDCP, there shouldn't be any sort of liability issue, as you are an enlisted member of the Navy. It is no different than any other enlisted member taking part in PT. As a PRO-REC, I understand there might be some liability issues, and even with a FS letter in hand, I can still understand the issues, as you're not technically being paid yet. Not a bad idea to get involved with an organized PT group, but if you can't, just bust your ass that much harder to get ready, I suppose.
yeah this was my thinking. So I'll clear it with my OR next week when I check in and I'll go from there, but I can't see where it'd be a big deal seeing as I'm IN the Navy and all.

If anybody hasn't checked into it, I think it's worth a shot, even if its ROTC like I'm doing and not NROTC, the Army recruits (is that what they call their midshipmen?) work just as hard, at least on my campus.
 
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