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PLC application process step by step

tonystro93

Member
I'm wondering what the step by step process is. I have searched the forums but have yet to find the answers I need.

I want to have as much done as possible for the application process upon meeting with the oso. I'm working out like crazy so I can achieve a 300 pft. and I'm studying my arco book for the astb. I want to let the oso know during our first meeting that I'm completely prepared for the test. I also want to get my lor's in order. I haven't a clue how to go about doing those. I have 5 people in mind. But how exactly are these lor's supposed to be written? I'm pretty sure some of my references have never written one before. I'd jut like a list of everything I'd need to bring. I really want to impress my oso with how serious and prepared I am.

-I appreciate your feedback
 

JWL

Member
Is it recommended that one do the two 6 week summers rather than the one 10 week program? I've heard pluses and minuses on both sides. Can anyone please provide some color? Thanks.
 

tonystro93

Member
JWL

I think it's recommended. OCS is physically demanding (from what I hear). Less likely to injure your self at jr's/sr's as opposed to combined. Also I think you start racking up time in service upon completion of juniors.
 

JWL

Member
Thanks!

How does PLC compare to ROTC? It seems like the big incentive with ROTC is that it helps pay for college. But, how competitive are those scholarships? Despite not officially preferring STEM majors like Navy, are STEM majors also preferred for Marine scholarships? Of course, with PLC, one can concentrate on the studies during the year. Is there any "checking in" with the Marines during the school year, however?
 

tonystro93

Member
Thanks!

How does PLC compare to ROTC? It seems like the big incentive with ROTC is that it helps pay for college. But, how competitive are those scholarships? Despite not officially preferring STEM majors like Navy, are STEM majors also preferred for Marine scholarships? Of course, with PLC, one can concentrate on the studies during the year. Is there any "checking in" with the Marines during the school year, however?
Just to let you know I'm a "wanna be" like you right now. I've never served and I haven't even started the application process for plc yet. But From looking around this site, I feel informed enough to answer some of your Q's. Just keep in mind all the information I have is mostly from the internet.

A girl I worked with a little while back put me in touch with her recently commissioned Navy boyfriend (who's actually in flight school right now). He did NROTC at WSU. He had started as a college programmer and picked up a two year scholarship. He said picking up a scholarship after doing a year or two as a programmer was totally doable. I mean, everything's doable if you work hard enough. He pretty much said it wasn't too difficult to attain one. Which kind of baffled me, because it seems all the feedback I hear online is "Good luck, there were only x amount available this year". Of course needs of the service are always changing. However that was the Navy side. I believe that the Navy option is more academic than the Marine option. His Marine buddy told me the Marines don't care about your major (But who knows? Maybe sometimes they do?). I've read some things stating the Marines don't care about you taking cal/physics classes. I'm fairly certain that the Navy is all about STEM majors. His Marine buddy gave me some good info, pretty much just put my mind at ease as to weather or not I'd be able to get PRK and have a waiver. Told me that every Marine option that wanted to fly ended up getting their wish. And they were even trying to get other kids to take the astb so they could get more.

I think you need to meet up once a month for PLC and run a PFT or attend some kind of function.

I usually don't use the search function on this site. I'll type in my question on google followed by "airwarriors" and I'll usually find what I'm looking for. Try typing in "NROTC vs PLC" or "NROTC PLC pros and cons"

Also, check out "Avery Soong" on youtube. He's a Marine officer candidate who's been to jr's. He's always posting informative videos.

Hopefully someone better informed can correct any bad gouge I may have gave.
 
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JWL

Member
Thanks.

I'm assuming one down side to ROTC is that if you accept money and for some reason it doesn't work out or you drop you out, you go enlisted.
 

nukon

Active Member
pilot
Thanks!

How does PLC compare to ROTC? It seems like the big incentive with ROTC is that it helps pay for college. But, how competitive are those scholarships? Despite not officially preferring STEM majors like Navy, are STEM majors also preferred for Marine scholarships? Of course, with PLC, one can concentrate on the studies during the year. Is there any "checking in" with the Marines during the school year, however?
There used to be a website 'Marine OCS Portal,' not sure if it's still around, but it was a much better source for OCS related info than airwarriors, which focuses on the aviation side - many of us are a little far removed from Brown Field.

I did PLC in 2011/2013, and commissioned in 2014. Having my pay based on entering the service in 2011 (my 'pay entry base date', or, 'PEBD') has made a huge difference for me financially relative to my USNA/OCC peers, who all have a PEBD in 2014. If you can't get a ROTC scholarship, I highly recommend PLC for that reason alone. The pay scale is publicly available, I recommend checking it out and seeing for yourself the difference it could make. Whether the scholarship would be the better deal for you requires some number crunching on money you'd earn with the earlier pay entry base date (PEBD) vs the money saved from a ROTC scholarship.

All OSO's run things a little differently. I had 3, all were varying degrees of hands on. Generally, my obligations during the school year as an applicant/candidate were to run a PFT and occasionally come up with an excuse not to go to pool functions.

Let me know if you have any other questions, and best of luck moving forward.

EDIT: Crapdamnit, didn't realize the original post was from two years ago
 

JWL

Member
Thanks...I didn't know you get service credit for pay purposes from the time you complete the first PLC. I guess that is good to know. I assume there is no pay during the school year? If not, that is fine. My ultimate goal is the commission, not the paycheck. That being said, if one goes the ROTC route as a scholarship is there a 2 year enlistment penalty for not completing the program once contracted?
 

nukon

Active Member
pilot
Thanks...I didn't know you get service credit for pay purposes from the time you complete the first PLC. I guess that is good to know. I assume there is no pay during the school year? If not, that is fine. My ultimate goal is the commission, not the paycheck. That being said, if one goes the ROTC route as a scholarship is there a 2 year enlistment penalty for not completing the program once contracted?
Can't help you with the ROTC questions. When I went through PLC, they offered 2 programs for PLC guys - the financial assistance program, or 'FAP' (good!) and the tuition assistance program 'TAP' (very very bad).

SparkNotes is:
- FAP gave you a small annual stipend, I believe up to 3-4x, in exchange for 6 months tacked on to your contract - as an aviation guy I wasn't sweating the 6 months and took the money. Maybe not the smartest move, but not the dumbest either.
- TAP gave you some amount, I remember it being maybe $5,500, towards your tuition. However, accepting it would reset that nice PLC PEBD I talked about in the post above, ultimately costing you way more than $5,500 in lost wages.

This is all old word, so I recommend doing a little research on what's available, then chatting with an OSO to confirm.
 

JWL

Member
Cool..thanks...considering the min commitment is 3.5 years after commissioning, an extra 6 months does not seem unreasonable.
 
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