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NSS Facts

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
None
Contributor
Question: When it comes time for pipeline selection, are you competing against only the SNAs in your squadron or in all primary squadrons (both whiting and corpus) who are finishing that week? Also, I have not been able to find a pub that shows how much academics count towards PAS or NSS. I have heard 10%, but have yet to see it in writing. Anybody know where to find the info? Thanks

1. Everyone who finishes that week.

2. Don't worry about it. Seriously. You should be getting a 90+ on all of the exams anyway. They aren't hard and you won't see a question or answer in which you haven't seen before.
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
It may be for aeronautical adaptivity training for mission specialists...an introduction if you will in to the world of military aviation, which might be quite a shock to folks who have spent a good chunk of time in a lab.
Late to the conversation, but they indeed were mission specialists- they came from science/lab backgrounds.
 

Heloanjin

Active Member
pilot
Question: Also, I have not been able to find a pub that shows how much academics count towards PAS or NSS. I have heard 10%, but have yet to see it in writing. Anybody know where to find the info? Thanks
Check the Master Curriculum Guide. The formula should be in there. If you look at the very first post in this thread, you'll see the formula as of 2007. Notice no mention of academics. The 10% number was thrown around back then, too. Some time long long ago academics wase included in the NSS calculation, but then it was taken out. You probably won't find anyone who can say when, but it was before your CO's were in flight school. Since few actually take the time to read an understand the instruction, everyone (including instructors) just keep repeating the 10%. Of course, I haven't seen a MCG in 5 years, so maybe it is back in there.
 

dariank619

New Member
Guys/Gals, look at your JPPT (http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/pubs/folder2/1542.166A.pdf) and see the formula used for calculating your PAS (Phase Aggregate Score).

The key factors here are (A) your overall ratio (B) squadron average overall ratio. Math says that if your score is higher than the squadron average, you are above a 50 NSS (assuming you have no unsat or marginal flights, as this plays a very small role - see formula). If you argue with math, you will lose. If you have unsat and marginals, you lose.

To determine your overall ratio, go into TIMS or your ATJ and look at the gradesheets for the the end of block flights (or most recent, up to date flights) and divide the total score (yours) by the total MIF you've carried. You will get a number that matches your stage score if you've done it correctly - 1.1x. This has to be done for each stage (Contact, BI, Form, RI, Nav), and you should have a numerator and denominator for total score and MIF you've carried throughout all blocks. There you have a number representing your "overall ratio". This is, of course, pointless unless you are within 10 flights or so and are wanting to see where you stand based on recent completers telling you what their overall ratios were and what kind of NSS they ended up with.

Did you get the Academic Achievement Award? Doesn't mean shit. Academics are not factored into your NSS. (http://www.cnatra.navy.mil/pubs/folder2/1500.4g_ch3.pdf) <--- see pg VII-14 & 15
NFOs have academics factored in, pilots do not.

Currently a 1.18 overall ratio in VT-2 gets a 46 NSS...this week...this varies by squadron. Hard to say where the cutoff for 50 is, but fuck that's high.
 

Johny0nThaSp0t

Member
pilot
All,

Does anyone have any idea how the "accelerated student" (Prof Advanced, or whatever) effects NSS. I was reading Jppt pg I-2 in addition to the equation, and I still cannot figure out whether it is a good idea to skip early block flights. Wouldn't I want to record as many early block flights as possible, if I can score above MIF?

According to the Accelerated syllabus you can only skip early contact flights.

Situation: MIF is high in the contact syllabus starting 4300 block. You cannot skip flights once you are in the 4300 block. If I skip the low MIF flights, wouldn't that put more weight on the later blocks and screw me?

Thanks
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
Depends on if you suck or not. If you're awesome, skip them and be done. If you have doubts, play it safe.
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
Acceleration helps by reducing
The # of total graded items. Accelerating isn't going to be your choice and I don't recommend it with T-6 if you've got less than about 500hrs if offered the choice.
 

Johny0nThaSp0t

Member
pilot
Acceleration helps by reducing
The # of total graded items. Accelerating isn't going to be your choice and I don't recommend it with T-6 if you've got less than about 500hrs if offered the choice.
Is Total Graded Items still part of the grade? In that case I could see how it would help. But the Jppt that we have now makes no mention to TGI.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
TGI doesn't matter. If you have 5 graded items or 10 graded items whose MIF is 3 and you make 4s your PAS is still a 1.33 (40/30 = 20/15)
 

Johny0nThaSp0t

Member
pilot
TGI doesn't matter. If you have 5 graded items or 10 graded items whose MIF is 3 and you make 4s your PAS is still a 1.33 (40/30 = 20/15)
Understood. But the decision to skip a flight gets complicated when the MIF rises in the next block. Is it more beneficial to fly as many flights early on when the MIF is low, in order to have those grades offset the later block flights when MIF is 4?
 

zippy

Freedom!
pilot
Contributor
Understood. But the decision to skip a flight gets complicated when the MIF rises in the next block. Is it more beneficial to fly as many flights early on when the MIF is low, in order to have those grades offset the later block flights when MIF is 4?
I've never seen a situation where a student got to pick and chose if they got to skip a flight. Plan on doing the full syllabus and not sucking, but be prepared to not suck if your squadron puts you on the accelerated program.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
I agree with zippy. Had a dude in my squadron with 4500 hours in the Regionals. He was very capable and smoked the Advanced syllabus. If your level of prior flight experience isn't similar, just do the whole syllabus. In reality, you're talking about skipping some of the most fun flights in Primary.
 
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