• Please take a moment and update your account profile. If you have an updated account profile with basic information on why you are on Air Warriors it will help other people respond to your posts. How do you update your profile you ask?

    Go here:

    Edit Account Details and Profile

Logging T-34 time

USFpilot06

Registered User
pilot
This is kind of a dumb question but does anyone know what the legality is of logging our time in our own personal log books. For example I am a private pilot. Can I log my time in the 34 in my own log book? Does it require any other signatures etc?
 

HAL Pilot

Well-Known Member
None
Contributor
There are a couple of reasons I can think of for keeping your military time in your civilian log book.

1. Civilians log time block out to block in. Military logs t/o to land. So the typical civilian logbook contains more time for the sam flight. If flying as a civilian pilot is in your plans after the military, this extra (and legal) time might come in handy. Some airlines like Southwest have former military guys add 0.3 hours to each leg in their military log to as a conversion factor. Most don't. Further most corporate flight department do not either. Keeping your military time in a civilian logbook just might get you over a minimum hours requirement for hiring or insurance.

2. At many military airfields, it takes a lot more than 0.3 to taxi out for t/o, get an IFR release and taxi back after landing. Southwest's 0.3 addition is the typical conversation factor for those that allow it. You might be short changing yourself towards an equivalent civilian time.

3. It's nice to have all your records in one book in chronological order. This way prespective employers do not have to jump between records when reviewing your logs. Keep and take your military logs as "proof" and be ready to explain the difference in logging leg times (out/in versus off/on from #1 above). Since you kept a civilian log, the prespective employers will accept the longer leg times as they will assume you keep track of actual times and did not just add a conversation factor.

4. If you lose your Navy logbook, you are not at the mercy of Navy record keeping to try and reconstruct it. I know of 5 or 6 guys this happened to.

Mefesto said:
Exactly... down the road that may bite you in the ass... logging the time twice.
You're not logging the time twice, you're just keeping two records and differentiating between military and civilian logging methods.
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Considering how much time I've spent in the hot-pits, I'd be logging some serious time.
 

jacob180

New Member
pilot
USFpilot06, do you have your high performance and complex endorsements from the civilian side? If you don't than you wouldn't really be legal to log the time prior to getting that from the Navy. Also, since the T-34 is a single pilot aircraft you can't log the dual time as PIC. Anyways, I would certainly log the dual as dual received and the solo time as PIC. Hope that helps.
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
I believe high performance only relates to piston aircraft.

As for complex, once you get the Commercial License after wings, you're good to go there.
 

USFpilot06

Registered User
pilot
USFpilot06, do you have your high performance and complex endorsements from the civilian side? If you don't than you wouldn't really be legal to log the time prior to getting that from the Navy. Also, since the T-34 is a single pilot aircraft you can't log the dual time as PIC. Anyways, I would certainly log the dual as dual received and the solo time as PIC. Hope that helps.
I don't really have any endorsements other than my PPL so no. But me and a few guys with PPLs were wondering how are military time would or if it even could transfer over to a civilian log book. Either way it nice to keep track of what you have done. HAL, thanks for the in put. I Don't really intend to fly for hire in the civilian world; however, i was just wondering how that would play out. Thanks!
 

Jay

Registered User
If I were to log it, I'd log it as PIC and Dual Received since you already have your PPL. I'd also make a separate "write in" column for "Turbine" time which would come in helpful later on. Your instructor "would" log it as Flight Instructor time and Total Time and PIC time, so the gent who said you can't log it as PIC is incorrect. 61.51 is a good toilet read.
 

mules83

getting salty...
pilot
As long as you have the same category and class (Airplane Single Engine Land) rating, you can log PIC. It might not mean you can 'act' as PIC, but you can still log it as such.

Every flight I have done in a S2B or a Malibu has been 'PIC' but there is no way I could act as one.
 

squirt

Registered User
As long as you have the same category and class (Airplane Single Engine Land) rating, you can log PIC. It might not mean you can 'act' as PIC, but you can still log it as such.

Every flight I have done in a S2B or a Malibu has been 'PIC' but there is no way I could act as one.

I disagree. If you dont have a high performance signoff (required for over 200hp I believe). You cant act as PIC. Furthermore, if you dont have a complex signoff (another requirement for aircraft with a retractable gear), you also cant log as PIC.

The reason you were able to log the Malibu as PIC is because you already had the appropriate ratings making you eligible to be the PIC, regardless of whether you feel you could act as one it is still legal.
 

P3_to_Apache

New Member
4. If you lose your Navy logbook, you are not at the mercy of Navy record keeping to try and reconstruct it. I know of 5 or 6 guys this happened to.
Happened to me, but I kept my time on a civilian log as well.

Also, if you intend to do the mil comp test, the time counts all the same.
 

Jay

Registered User
I disagree. If you dont have a high performance signoff (required for over 200hp I believe). You cant act as PIC. Furthermore, if you dont have a complex signoff (another requirement for aircraft with a retractable gear), you also cant log as PIC.
Yeah, I agree, forgot about that one. Ask around the squadron, guarantee one of the students has a current CFI and would just sign it off for you.
 

Fly Navy

...Great Job!
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
Mefesto said:
I made up for all my hot pit time with the 4.0's I logged at the boat getting 4-5 traps.
I log a 4.0 in the pits in one week of flying...
 
Top