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fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
Let's talk about the quals process and it's inconsistency across niocs...

Each AC command can execute the instruction however they like, provided some minimum markers are met. From what I've seen, this leads to fragmentation.
 

devilbones

Active Member
What was your experience like? Did you do the same process as the AC? I think that if you board that should be sufficient, no matter what specific requirements each NIOC has in order for you to make it to the board.
 

fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
I did mine with the AC (doesn't everyone?). The instruction allowing NR NIOCs to run their own show changed last year sometime. However, perception is everything, and no unit wants to be known for pumping out "watered down" crippies.

Seems like they put in so many checks/balances to prevent folks with knowledge gaps getting through, which I appreciate. However it should probably be more scenario-based.
 

fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
I did mine with the AC (doesn't everyone?). The instruction allowing NR NIOCs to run their own show changed last year sometime. However, perception is everything, and no unit wants to be known for pumping out "watered down" crippies.

Seems like they put in so many checks/balances to prevent folks with knowledge gaps getting through, which I appreciate. However it should probably be more scenario-based.
More mico/mini boards is not the answer. That just increases the issue of getting them scheduled. Ultimately, whatever the solution, it should be corporatized across the board.
 

devilbones

Active Member
More mico/mini boards is not the answer. That just increases the issue of getting them scheduled. Ultimately, whatever the solution, it should be corporatized across the board.
I can upload our current instruction for boarding. I dont think that the RC has to follow the AC, however it has been traditionally done that way. I dont think there is enough time to get the exposure to the material.
 

fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
I would agree for the most part. My dwe tend to devolve into who is dink on something the nosc cares about, followed closely by who is locked out due to lapsed accounts (>30 days). By that time is almost time for chow. Come back and deal with whatever Region has sent down, scrub some evals/fitreps, and it's time for PT. Sunday is usually more of the same...

Hence the reason why 1815's get that special pot of money. Ninety-one days with no collateral duties. There is a not insignificant amount of our qual that needs a scif. Plus rote memorization only gets you so far (see: evolving scenario).

My RC defers to the AC program. There are three mini-boards, each with written exam and oral board of JO's. Then there's the murder board to put it all together with a small scenario. After that there's the final board (all scenario) usually chaired by an O-5. Expect lookups at any point, and you can't do your murder final board without both books fully signed. The 1815/18xx is concurrent through the first half of the final board.
 

NC2018

Member
I'm wondering where most CW's get stationed after Corry Station. I've read/heard that Ft. Meade is (obviously) a pretty common one. Does anyone have any insight on the others?
 

fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
Since someone asked...

Q: How fast can you finish your quals?
A: Depends on your local command's instruction. I've heard of 6 weeks, but personally seen someone do it in about 8 weeks. If you're properly motivated and don't get distracted, the hold-up will be getting other qualified officers to sit your boards. This is assuming that you are using the 91-day pot of special funding. It's sole purpose is to give you time at a NIOC (with a program), and no collateral duties (such as watchstanding/CDO, etc.) are to be imposed on you during this time. Just so we're on the same page, the designator is on a 36-month clock, while the pin is on a 60-month clock (applies only to reservists).

Q: How soon can you mobilize?
A: I've heard of others going on ADT orders within their first year, but this is not a mobilization in the truest sense. it's just taking short-term orders to fill a need (and possibly your own pockets). In practice you won't be allowed to mobilize while you are still IAP (in-assignment processing). This puts a special MAS code on your record that prevents you from being mobilized. Until you are at least designator qualified (ideally fully-qualified), you are really going to be in the way, and possibly even a professional detriment to mission and your own career. I almost got sent to a ship as a ride-along a while back before I got my pin. I would have been less useful than a baby SWO (cue them song...) Do your time, and learn what you're supposed to learn. You'll thank yourself later.

Q: What courses are required and how often are they offered?
A: All this is laid out in the Program Authorization (PA 108C), but for the sake of completeness...
ODS (5wks), IWBC/DIVOLC (4wks), CWOBC(6wks). Due to the DCOIC->ODS shift, I'm unsure whether the first AT will be earmarked in the same manner (technically, you'd have to use AT/E-AT/ADT combination to get five weeks, with minimum cost). Course availability is determined by at least two things (that I know about) - Funding availability, and the number of folks who sign up. Class can/will be canx'd due to low enrollment.

Q: What about AT, and AT in conjunction with ADT?
A: AT is a statutory requirement of 12-14 days of Annual Training, or active-duty days (doesn't have to be consecutive; don't expect paid travel in two chunks however). If member elects, and funding exists, AT can be exterequested (E-AT) out to a max of 29 days (21 days for officers). Beyond the 21 day mark, some other type of funding must be used (ADT-Special/Schools, ADSW). Typically, when executing your 91 days of CWO training, it will be 14 days AT, plus another 7 of E-AT, then ADT for the remaining 70, for a total of 91 days. Ultimately, how a requirement is funded depends on the gaining command, and any Community level instruction/OPNAVINST/NAVADMIN that may further restrict how money is spent. Look for gaining commands to choose funding methods that minimize impact on their own funding lines. Expect to see something along the lines of "ADT funds available; preference is given to members who have AT funds remaining..."

Q: Can I get multiple AT/ADT in an FY?
A: AT will only fund 12-14 days. After that anything you see/get will end up being E-AT or ADT. If your eyes are open, and your typing skills are lightning fast, you may be able to put your name on money that opens up randomly.

Q: How long are MOB/ADSW, and where are they located?
A: Mobilizations can be anywhere from 180 to 365 days, possibly longer. ADSW length is determined by the requirement owner. Locations are OPSEC sensitive, so won't get into the details here.

Q: How do the billets work
A: Upon inital accession, you'll be marked IAP. This is basically to keep you from getting mobilized, and it lets the community track who needs to finish their quals. The IWC doesn't have a "training" designator, so this is really how it's done. Once you've attained your pin, you can/should apply for a "hard" billet via JOApply.
 

CWO_change

New Member
I qualified CWO and IWO at Hawaii. Most people I've talked to who have experienced the Hawaii process and the process at other NIOCs say that Hawaii has a fairly grueling process (not necessarily for the better). At Hawaii, you have to give 8 briefs on pre-determined topics before sitting for your 1810 knowledge board, which will be chaired by an O-3. This is followed by your 1810 qualification board, chaired by an O-5 or O-5 select.

For IWO, after completing a written test, you are subject to a knowledge board (chaired by an O-3), a Q&A session (chaired by an O-4 or O-4 select), and scenario board with the CO (chaired by an O-5).

I think one of the biggest gripes about the qualification process at Hawaii is the relative lack of direction for people going through the qualification process, something that is amplified by how spread out across the island the command is.

Over all, it took me longer to complete the qualification than I would have liked, but I was deployed (DIRSUP) for a hot minute.
 

egiv

Well-Known Member
Let's talk about the quals process and it's inconsistency across niocs...

Each AC command can execute the instruction however they like, provided some minimum markers are met. From what I've seen, this leads to fragmentation.
What, specifically, are you referring to in terms of inconsistency? Also not sure what you mean by fragmentation. Anecdotally I've heard about some differences in the qual process across the big NIOCs but by and large I think we're holding a decent standard, at least at the big four commands (certainly better than the NKO that some got their pins from). Smaller programs can be much more hit or miss.

Ultimately different commands are going to be subject to different personalities and priorities, but this is the same across the Navy. The standard for a SWO pin depends heavily on the CO. It's impossible to capture everything on a PQS or board; at some point someone just has to make a judgement call on whether the person's a turd or not.
 

devilbones

Active Member
I am interested in learning about advanced schools and other opportunities. Can anyone talk about different billets and special training that is available to the community?
 
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