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Computing NSS Quesstimate

insanebikerboy

Internet killed the television star
pilot
None
Contributor
When were you given your projected NSS? And which squadron were you in? I havn't heard of the guys in 6 getting anything projected - Im into RIs and have heard nothing of my own... Just curious. Thanks.
I doubt you'll be getting a projected anymore since TIMS is in place. They may be able to take a swag at it but I doubt it. The guys I know in 2 had gotten their projected NSS after they completed the entire syllabus and then come selection day it was about 10-15 points lower. So, moral of the story, don't put any weight on your NSS until your actual selection day.
 

Herc_Dude

I believe nicotine + caffeine = protein
pilot
Contributor
Good - I dont want to know. Ill keep my feet on the ground and head in the clouds. (figuratively, of course) :D
 

Cavt

Living the dream
pilot
When were you given your projected NSS? And which squadron were you in? I havn't heard of the guys in 6 getting anything projected - Im into RIs and have heard nothing of my own... Just curious. Thanks.

I'm in 6 and select next week, I went in to update my calender card and there was a sheet in my jacket with all my grading info in it and an NSS. I asked if it was my actual or my projected and they said that was my actual and my projected was 9 points higher...so I didnt really get a projected since I was done with the sylabus when I found out what it was...
 

mcarther101

New Member
I'm in 6 and select next week, I went in to update my calender card and there was a sheet in my jacket with all my grading info in it and an NSS. I asked if it was my actual or my projected and they said that was my actual and my projected was 9 points higher...so I didnt really get a projected since I was done with the sylabus when I found out what it was...
Just so everyone knows, I am highly skeptical of this equation. I have a 1.1206, and TIMS says I have a 31.7NSS (not a 48); I have 1 graded flight left and a form solo. FML. Going to drink away my sorrows now.
 

OUSOONER

O-4 Line of sight tasking is real...
pilot
Just so everyone knows, I am highly skeptical of this equation. I have a 1.1206, and TIMS says I have a 31.7NSS (not a 48); I have 1 graded flight left and a form solo. FML. Going to drink away my sorrows now.
Global Hawks!
 

Erin M.

Active Member
pilot
It is amazing to look at this thread and the other NSS thread and see the level of misinformation that exists. :eek:
 

Erin M.

Active Member
pilot
Also, a bunch of people have asked this during my time at primary, so I am posting here.

With the MIF system, your NSS is a function of your aggregate score and your cumulative unsats/marginals with respect to the averages of your squadron.

Your overall aggregate score is unavailable in TIMS as far as I know. You're able to see the stage score totals for the cumulative score in each stage. For those of you who don't know what the score actually is, it is simply the ratio of your cumulative graded totals to the MIF for each corresponding maneuver completed. Thus, if you had completed one maneuver, ie. Landing Flap Landing and received a 5, where MIF is a 4, your score would be a 1.25 (5/4.)

So,[for the T-6b students] in TIMS you can see your overall ratio in Contacts, Formation, Radio Instruments, Basic Instruments, and Navigation. Many people mistakenly believe that these overall scores are all incorporated evenly. Others believe that these are weighted differently. Neither is true, because the stage scores are not used. In actuality, Contacts "counts more" than Navigation for example, simply because you will have more graded maneuvers in contacts. Every maneuver in every stage counts equally. Thus, your overall score is the sum of every maneuver you've completed in every stage divided by the MIF for every maneuver.

Your overall score will be something like, 1.1713 or 1.1556. This score is then plugged into the formula given in the JPPT. Essentially, the squadron average score is subtracted from your score. The result is divided by the standard deviation. That result is then multiplied by .9. The same thing is done with your unsats/marginals and the result is multiplied by .1. The two figures are added and the sum is multiplied by 10 and added to 50. This result is your "phase aggregate score."

The PAS is then normalized by the same process. The squadron average PAS is subtracted from your PAS and divided by the squadron standard deviation of PAS. That result is multiplied by 10 and added to 50 to produce your NSS.
 

Erin M.

Active Member
pilot
So, for everyone trying to figure out what you have, you just aren't going to be able to accurately predict your final result. Unless you're able to figure out what the squadron average and standard deviation for overall scores are, and then what the squadron average PAS and standard deviation PAS are, you're not going to know.

There are too many unknown variables.

For example, I finished with a 1.884 in VT-6 and a 60 NSS. We can estimate that my score is roughly 1 standard deviation above the squadron average, but without the mean, you can't figure out the actual standard deviation.

I guess with a lot of time and a lot of friends who have recently completed, you could put together a large enough sample to figure out a reasonable accurate squadron average overall and squadron standard deviation, but with all that time you'd help your grade a lot more by studying.
 

Erin M.

Active Member
pilot
Not that there isn't a wealth of good info and advice too, I was just passing time trying to clarify something that I know a lot of students have questions about.
 

wlawr005

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
So, for everyone trying to figure out what you have, you just aren't going to be able to accurately predict your final result. Unless you're able to figure out what the squadron average and standard deviation for overall scores are, and then what the squadron average PAS and standard deviation PAS are, you're not going to know.

There are too many unknown variables.

For example, I finished with a 1.884 in VT-6 and a 60 NSS. We can estimate that my score is roughly 1 standard deviation above the squadron average, but without the mean, you can't figure out the actual standard deviation.

I guess with a lot of time and a lot of friends who have recently completed, you could put together a large enough sample to figure out a reasonable accurate squadron average overall and squadron standard deviation, but with all that time you'd help your grade a lot more by studying.
A 1.884? I call bullshit.
 
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