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Another "What are my chances" Post

Hello all.

My name is Jacob and I am nearing the end of my junior year in high school. I have always been drawn to aviation, and more recently the military side. Being a naval aviator would be a dream of mine, as I can serve my country and fly airplanes. I am currently taking all advanced courses and have a 3.3 GPA (not exact as my school goes off a a 6.0 scale and that is converted to 4.0 by myself, plus I have not taken finals this year yet), and that should rise in the next month or so. I am relatively physically fit, but definitely have room for improvement as far as Navy standards. I have had a steady job as a bicycle mechanic for the last year and plan on training for my PPL this next year. My father has been an airline pilot for the last 17 years or so, and I have no military family. I have been a musician in various orchestras for the past 7 years. I plan on majoring in Computer Science at Texas A&M University, beginning in the Fall of 2022.

Here's the "but": I have mild colorblindness. Other than that, I have 20/20 vision uncorrected and the most concerning medical issue I have ever had is a buckle fracture in my left wrist. I have been able to pass the PIP plates, but the majority of tests I take have diagnosed me with mild protan colorblindness (including my doctor). I have passed the FALANT test, but it looks like that won't be around for much longer. According to the NAMI Waiver Guide, I should be able to take an electronic test as well as a practical cockpit test (Link to source). How big of an issue is this as far as getting a 4-year NROTC scholarship at Texas A&M? How does it affect my chances of becoming a Naval Aviator?

The ultimate goal is fighter pilot, but I would be more than happy to fly literally anything. I know it is a lot of information, but any help I could get with this topic would mean a lot.

Thanks in advance,
Jacob
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Hello all.

My name is Jacob and I am nearing the end of my junior year in high school. I have always been drawn to aviation, and more recently the military side. Being a naval aviator would be a dream of mine, as I can serve my country and fly airplanes. I am currently taking all advanced courses and have a 3.3 GPA (not exact as my school goes off a a 6.0 scale and that is converted to 4.0 by myself, plus I have not taken finals this year yet), and that should rise in the next month or so. I am relatively physically fit, but definitely have room for improvement as far as Navy standards. I have had a steady job as a bicycle mechanic for the last year and plan on training for my PPL this next year. My father has been an airline pilot for the last 17 years or so, and I have no military family. I have been a musician in various orchestras for the past 7 years. I plan on majoring in Computer Science at Texas A&M University, beginning in the Fall of 2022.

Here's the "but": I have mild colorblindness. Other than that, I have 20/20 vision uncorrected and the most concerning medical issue I have ever had is a buckle fracture in my left wrist. I have been able to pass the PIP plates, but the majority of tests I take have diagnosed me with mild protan colorblindness (including my doctor). I have passed the FALANT test, but it looks like that won't be around for much longer. According to the NAMI Waiver Guide, I should be able to take an electronic test as well as a practical cockpit test (Link to source). How big of an issue is this as far as getting a 4-year NROTC scholarship at Texas A&M? How does it affect my chances of becoming a Naval Aviator?

The ultimate goal is fighter pilot, but I would be more than happy to fly literally anything. I know it is a lot of information, but any help I could get with this topic would mean a lot.

Thanks in advance,
Jacob
Only those that review the medical file can tell you for sure, but each case I had where a person was "color deficient" or "mild colorblindness" resulted in them being not qualified for aviation, a few had their PPL but they were still a no go. One was actually the son of a friend of mine I served with.
 
Only those that review the medical file can tell you for sure, but each case I had where a person was "color deficient" or "mild colorblindness" resulted in them being not qualified for aviation, a few had their PPL but they were still a no go. One was actually the son of a friend of mine I served with.
Ok, figured that would be the general answer. I know there isn't a way to guarantee a flight slot out of NROTC, but is there a way to at least see if I would be physically qualified as far as sight goes before I commit to anything?
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Ok, figured that would be the general answer. I know there isn't a way to guarantee a flight slot out of NROTC, but is there a way to at least see if I would be physically qualified as far as sight goes before I commit to anything?
Part of the process to obtain a NROTC scholarship is a physical, they will let you know there if you are qualified at that time, that is where some people get tripped up and that is where alternates get in. I had a MCC I knew who's son had an NROTC scholarship did the physical and didn't pass color vision test, not color blind, just deficient and was told not qualified so he declined the scholarship.
 
Part of the process to obtain a NROTC scholarship is a physical, they will let you know there if you are qualified at that time, that is where some people get tripped up and that is where alternates get in. I had a MCC I knew who's son had an NROTC scholarship did the physical and didn't pass color vision test, not color blind, just deficient and was told not qualified so he declined the scholarship.
Gotcha. Thanks for the info and quick responses.
 

Ozarky

Well-Known Member
pilot
Have no idea if this is still relevant, so apologies if this is a dead end; but I seem to recall a similar thread from a long time ago regarding a guy who wanted to be a Naval Aviator but was also color deficient. Got told no in as many ways as they could, but I believe due to slightly different color vision standards in the Army, pursued that route and he was able to eventually become a pilot, of course after a mountain of paperwork and at least a year or two of getting told no. Sorry if it’s a dead end, but perhaps something worth looking into!
 
Have no idea if this is still relevant, so apologies if this is a dead end; but I seem to recall a similar thread from a long time ago regarding a guy who wanted to be a Naval Aviator but was also color deficient. Got told no in as many ways as they could, but I believe due to slightly different color vision standards in the Army, pursued that route and he was able to eventually become a pilot, of course after a mountain of paperwork and at least a year or two of getting told no. Sorry if it’s a dead end, but perhaps something worth looking into!
Okay, I read a few stories of guys who were able to get a different test done through the Army's WOFT program. Would talking with a recruiter help narrow out my options, or would I just be told no from the start by most of them?
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Okay, I read a few stories of guys who were able to get a different test done through the Army's WOFT program. Would talking with a recruiter help narrow out my options, or would I just be told no from the start by most of them?
you would need to get a physical from a MEPS or MTF and you are way too early for that. I hate to tell you but you will probably be in limbo and wondering for a while.
 
you would need to get a physical from a MEPS or MTF and you are way too early for that. I hate to tell you but you will probably be in limbo and wondering for a while.
Ok, I appreciate the insight. My only concern is the application for an NROTC scholarship would be due within the next year or so, and I just want to be aware of my options before going past the point of no return, if that makes sense.
 

Pags

Positive Void Coefficient
pilot
Ok, I appreciate the insight. My only concern is the application for an NROTC scholarship would be due within the next year or so, and I just want to be aware of my options before going past the point of no return, if that makes sense.
You used to be able to drop the NROTC scholarship after your first year no questions asked. I had a few friends who did that due to physical issues.
 
You used to be able to drop the NROTC scholarship after your first year no questions asked. I had a few friends who did that due to physical issues.
Ok. As of right now I think I will go for it, maybe it'll work out maybe it won't. Worst case I can either drop out (if this still exists) or not accept the scholarship.
 
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