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Air National Guard gouge

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
Question, as it may not be the same (but I'm guessing it is) for the ANG...

Does "break in service" mean the same thing as it does in the naval (lowercase) Reserves? For example, a break in service doesn't mean you're not on AD for 4 months, it means you don't have enough points to finish a FY. So you could have 3 months of naval AD that started on 1 SEP and then not be affiliated with anyone for 4 months, and then drill for the rest of the FY and you still don't have a break in service. Same same?

This is something that's hard to wrap your head around during a transition, but I'd try and explain when accessing someone.
 

Swanee

Self aware since 2014
pilot
None
Contributor
Question, as it may not be the same (but I'm guessing it is) for the ANG...

Does "break in service" mean the same thing as it does in the naval (lowercase) Reserves? For example, a break in service doesn't mean you're not on AD for 4 months, it means you don't have enough points to finish a FY. So you could have 3 months of naval AD that started on 1 SEP and then not be affiliated with anyone for 4 months, and then drill for the rest of the FY and you still don't have a break in service. Same same?

This is something that's hard to wrap your head around during a transition, but I'd try and explain when accessing someone.
So they treat it in a similar way, but it's not necessarily the same (though a "bad" year is considered a break in service).

Because I was completely separated from the USMC, and not affiliated with any Guard or Reserve unit for 4 months, I'm considered to have a break in service in my initial joining into the ANG. My break is only administrative, and does not have any effect on me having a good year. It just means that they have to adjust my DOR and a few other things to align with stuff like Time in Grade and all. (I've got more than enough points, and my unit is very awesome with Rescheduled UTAs). But Points matter a lot. And there are certain times of the year where joining as a DSG sucks, because your allotments are fiscal year, but your points are annual based on your joining date. If you aren't careful you can run into a scenario in which you're stuck not getting enough points for a good year because the fiscal year didn't line up and you need more for the rollover. I still don't fully understand this part, but I know that there are plenty of people around who are more than happy to sit down and explain how to work the schedule and maximize pay in the Guard/Reserves.

Caveat this with what the medical side considers a "break in service". You don't want that, as you have to go back through MEPS. I got a flight physical and a NATOPS check on my way out the door, just for this reason. I should have said this earlier, and I'll say it in the ARB and Medical notes, but- if you can do this, do it.
 

RedFive

Well-Known Member
pilot
None
Contributor
@Swanee pretty decent start! I'll try my hand at the AF Reserve side. This will not be all encompassing, but will definitely be a start...

How to Join the AF Reserves (Part 1)
Step 1: Be cool.

Step 2: Don't be uncool.

Step 3: Contact a squadron.

Step 3A: Know someone in the unit you want to go to and call them. Right now. It's ringing, right? Proceed to Step 4!

Step 3B: Knowing someone in the unit you want to go to is a great start, but it doesn't necessarily mean anything! My mentor introduced me to his Chief Pilot and CO and I had long conversations with both of them, but nobody could seem to get the "hiring guy" to do his job and respond to my emails. YMMV. If you don't know anyone that's okay! First, do some google research on all the bases the AF has and check out the ones in locations you would be interested in. Then find out what aircraft those locations fly. Specifically keep an eye out for AF Reserve (and Guard) squadrons. Take note of the squadrons and aircraft types that interest you.

Step 3C: I am about to give you an amazing secret that I came up with on my own. It should probably be locked behind a private forum. Instead, I will bury it in useless text so nobody can easily find it. Did you know Marines eat crayons? And women are crazy? Mine got pissed at me the other night, ohhh man, she even cursed me out in Spanish. I had to use Google Translate to even fucking figure out what the hell she was saying. Tell you what though, Spanish speakers are pretty creative when it comes to cursing. Anyways, here's what you do...find the closest IFR Supp and crack it open. Look up the base you're interested in going to and cold call Base Ops. Tell them you're LT/Capt so and so, trying to contact OPS for [insert squadron]. Be prepared to write down numbers and play a bunch of phone games. They may get you straight to OPS. They may get you to the squadron's admin or the GS bean counter down the hall. Whatever it is, write down all the numbers and try to take notes on which number is which. Explain to each person you talk to that you're looking for the Chief Pilot. You will undoubtedly have to explain your background/situation multiple times and eventually they will get you to the Chief Pilot or the hiring dude/dudette. Rinse and repeat for multiple squadrons -- do not put all your eggs in one basket, you'll be disappointed at the results.

Step 4: Once you have a contact at the squadron and have explained your background and interest in the squadron they may want you to send a resume (We'll try to setup another thread for military resumes here). Don't sit on this, get it done ASAP and fire it off before they forget who you are. Whenever that's done, find out when you can visit and have a beer! Bring booze for the squadron. Bring something you would want to drink. Don't let it just get shoved in the squadron fridge with all the other booze without notice! That will happen if you're not careful and you'll feel like you wasted your money. I'm not saying be obnoxious and tell everyone you brought booze, just don't let it go unnoticed. Maybe slap some tape on the side and write "Fly Navy Air Force!!!" to get some laughs. You can thank me for that one later. Anyways, have them show you around the squadron and introduce you to people. Don't worry about trying to remember names, there's one of you and dozens of them.

Step 5: Interview them. You're at the squadron, you're meeting people....This is your chance to interview them. I've been to more than one squadron full of pre-madonnas looking down their nose at helo trash. Those squadrons can get fucked. That's just my personal take, but if you're at a squadron and for whatever reason you're just not feeling the vibe, no worries because there are more squadrons out there.

Step 6: Visit the squadron again. Bring Booze.

Step 7: See Step 6.

Step 8: If there's any indication at all they might hire you, contact a recruiter ahead of time, otherwise you can wait until after the interview. Here's how it works: squadron interviews pilot and gives the thumbs up. Recruiter gets thumbs up from squadron and does the paperwork with you while the squadron is pretty hands-off. In our case, you need to contact an AF Reserve Officer Recruiter. Some are going to be more familiar with this gold-to-silver process than others. Mine was very familiar and I can forward his contact if you like. I'm not sure if they are geographically limited to who they can work with, but it's worth a shot. In any case, start working with the recruiter ASAP -- even if it's before you've been hired. You can tell them your squadron has extended an interview and basically told you you've got the job and they'll more than likely start working with you.

Step 9: Have the recruiter help you setup an AF Flight Physical at the nearest AFB to you. Get it done ASAP because it will take at least six months to all get approved and signed off.

Step 10: Interview with the squadron. This may happen anywhere from Step 5 to now. Have a handful of "Tell me a time" type stories you can tell. Try to be funny. Know what your spirit animal is before walking into the interview. Have a reason why you want to relocate to the area, even if it's not necessarily, like, 100% accurate. Make it a good reason. Also have a good reason why you want to join the AF Reserves and not the Navy/Marine Reserves. Have a good reason why you want to fly their platform. Have fun in your interview. Last but not least, dress to impress. Roll in there with your dress blues and that stack of ribbons you got from cruising around on USS Bucket. Bring a flight suit to change out into so you can throw down afterward.

Step 11: Nope, not tonight. I need to remind myself that I'm a dirty Reservist now. I've already done waaaay too much work today. It's time for a cerveza!!! 🍻 ¡Salud! 🍺 ¡Qué vivas durante todos los días de tu vida! 🍻
 
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