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I want to be a professional (non-airline) pilot when I grow up

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#76
I'm surprised Austin has enough going on, aviation-wise, to need a program like that. The biggest crime in Austin is having a garden that's not truly organic.

Hell, if I got bored in Baltimore, I think I'd eat my Glock flying patrol in Austin.
It may not have enough going on. Maybe it was a one-time thing. Their whole program seems pretty robust, though. Maybe they don't have anything else to do.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#77
I know there's many here who may have already started planning/learning/living for what comes after the Navy, so I figured I'd start a new thread rather than compete with boring airline talk in the airlines thread. Obviously some of the same info applies.

While I still have plenty of time, I've started to do some of the initial research on "who" exactly is out there on the commercial helo/ASEL front. Some of my research has started to generate questions and figured I'd start here:

- Is there a decent commercial helicopter (or non-airline) web forum? I've found a few sites on Google, but the discussion seemed almost worthless. It's the simple things like "who owns the base in X city?"

- one of the more well-known EMS employers has 200 hours of CCX time as a requirement. In the FARs, it defines everything except military rotary (50 miles FW/25 miles RW). For fixed wing time, it's pretty easy to just include all of the military time as CCX (except maybe any 2K2 time). Presumably you could just use the civilian rotary definition for military time, but talk about a giant pain in the ass in trying to actually calculate that, especially as an IP where some flights you don't even leave the pattern. Anyone been given any advice on this? Is it just easiest to include all military rotary time as CCX time?
As a heads up, if you want your Rotary (Helicopter) ATP, you will need 1200 hours total time. The one requirement everyone forgets is 500 hours of cross country time - which in a helicopter is defined as flying at least 25 nm (straight line distance) from the takeoff point, LANDING, and if you want, return. In other words, you could takeoff and fly 40+ miles away (i.e., operating in the western operating area at Whiting) but if you do not land, it is not considered cross country. For it to count, you would have to at least do a stop and go at Bay Minette. The question is: how do you prove it in your logbook? You may want to make a note in the remarks section for every flight that qualified.

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title14-vol2/pdf/CFR-2001-title14-vol2-sec61-161.pdf

The generally accepted custom at the HTs is to log all of your boat time as CCX. It is presumable that the boat moved 25 miles from taking off to landing.
You may want to check and see if the FAA considers that a legal interpretation.


On a separate note, if any pilot is interested in getting their small drone license (commercial use, less than 55 pounds) it is FAA Part 107 - rules came out a few months ago. Don't know if I will ever use it, but knocked it out anyway.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/06/new-faa-drone-rules-require-pilot-certificate/
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#78
As a heads up, if you want your Rotary (Helicopter) ATP, you will need 1200 hours total time. The one requirement everyone forgets is 500 hours of cross country time - which in a helicopter is defined as flying at least 25 nm (straight line distance) from the takeoff point, LANDING, and if you want, return. In other words, you could takeoff and fly 40+ miles away (i.e., operating in the western operating area at Whiting) but if you do not land, it is not considered cross country. For it to count, you would have to at least do a stop and go at Bay Minette. The question is: how do you prove it in your logbook? You may want to make a note in the remarks section for every flight that qualified.

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title14-vol2/pdf/CFR-2001-title14-vol2-sec61-161.pdf
I'm out of time this morning to check some more, but I don't believe this is true. Cross Country time is defined as taking off and landing (or T&G) at another airport, regardless of the distance.

A Cross-Country for earning your initial ticket is defined as flying 50 miles (or 25 miles for helos) to another airport. The two have different definitions, hence my original question about about landing on a boat that's in MODLOC. Technically it's moved from it's original geographic position.
 

BACONATOR

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
#79
I'm out of time this morning to check some more, but I don't believe this is true. Cross Country time is defined as taking off and landing (or T&G) at another airport, regardless of the distance.

A Cross-Country for earning your initial ticket is defined as flying 50 miles (or 25 miles for helos) to another airport. The two have different definitions, hence my original question about about landing on a boat that's in MODLOC. Technically it's moved from it's original geographic position.
It depends on the context of the definition. XC for PPL and ATP are different. And for the fixed wing ATP, a landing is not required. Only to fly to a geographic location 50nm away. All my low-levels in the T-6 counted.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#80
I'm out of time this morning to check some more, but I don't believe this is true. Cross Country time is defined as taking off and landing (or T&G) at another airport, regardless of the distance.

A Cross-Country for earning your initial ticket is defined as flying 50 miles (or 25 miles for helos) to another airport. The two have different definitions, hence my original question about about landing on a boat that's in MODLOC. Technically it's moved from it's original geographic position.
Had a chance to look this up and I misspoke. Randy is correct for ATP mins. I was speaking to the non-certificate-seeking pilot (like -135 mins). Mea culpa.

I would quote Part 61, but the internet is being stupid.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#82
Had a chance to look this up and I misspoke. Randy is correct for ATP mins. I was speaking to the non-certificate-seeking pilot (like -135 mins). Mea culpa.

I would quote Part 61, but the internet is being stupid.
That brings up a great point about the differences in regulations. For those leaving the military for a Part 135 operator, you will need to know the FAA rules, in particular keeping up with the differences in weather between Part 91, Part 135 and company operating regulations - and by the way, if you a reservist, not forgetting the military rules. Always good to start making a cheat sheet to study and keep them separate.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
#83
Gulf of Mexico oil and gas operators are now transferring assets to other locations due to lack of demand. Here, Bristow is teaming with "Blade" (think Uber for helicopters) for S-76C++'s to fly rich people from NYC to the Hamptons - far cry from roughnecks to the rigs.






https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-...-26/bristow-teams-blade-nyc-s-76-helo-service

https://www.verticalmag.com/press-releases/bristow-blade-provide-cabin-class-service-new-york/

https://www.ft.com/content/ffc43f0a-5711-11e7-9fed-c19e2700005f
 

fuknadub

Mask, fins and floaties
#84
Gulf of Mexico oil and gas operators are now transferring assets to other locations due to lack of demand. Here, Bristow is teaming with "Blade" (think Uber for helicopters) for S-76C++'s to fly rich people from NYC to the Hamptons - far cry from roughnecks to the rigs.

Era is hiring, we had interviews today. Era also partnered with Blade late Spring in LA and NYC.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Off. Former Recruiter.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#86
I have been flying out of SNA for awhile now. I frequently have CBP Air guys on board. Finally got to talk at length with one. Turns out they run pilots through recurrent training at a facility on the field. He says they are really hurting for people. Will take anyone with a pulse, if you pass the polygraph, a problem for a surprising number. No need for a dual rating let alone much fixed wing time if you have one. He said they are losing guys to the airlines like everyone else.
 

Uncle Fester

Robot Pimp
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#87
I have been flying out of SNA for awhile now. I frequently have CBP Air guys on board. Finally got to talk at length with one. Turns out they run pilots through recurrent training at a facility on the field. He says they are really hurting for people. Will take anyone with a pulse, if you pass the polygraph, a problem for a surprising number. No need for a dual rating let alone much fixed wing time if you have one. He said they are losing guys to the airlines like everyone else.
CBP’s hiring process is a complete shit show. Nobody in or out of the agency seems to understand how it works, it takes forever, the poly is absurd (and takes an entire day). They lose a ton of people during the process, to hear them tell it. It’s a rare bird who’ll persevere through all that ass pain to be a GL-11 (-9 for the AEAs) when there are much better offers to be had. And as you say, between retirements and guys running to the Show®️, they’re having trouble hanging on to the guys they do have.

Everyone in CBP is aware of the problems, but most of the problems are Congressionally mandated. At least now they’ll waive the poly if you have a current SSBI.
 

fuknadub

Mask, fins and floaties
#88
CBP’s hiring process is a complete shit show. Nobody in or out of the agency seems to understand how it works, it takes forever, the poly is absurd (and takes an entire day). They lose a ton of people during the process, to hear them tell it. It’s a rare bird who’ll persevere through all that ass pain to be a GL-11 (-9 for the AEAs) when there are much better offers to be had. And as you say, between retirements and guys running to the Show®️, they’re having trouble hanging on to the guys they do have.

Everyone in CBP is aware of the problems, but most of the problems are Congressionally mandated. At least now they’ll waive the poly if you have a current SSBI.
Concur. Spoke with one of the recruiters for AIA UAS pilot gig, hot and heavy in recruiting for direct hire, sent them everything they asked for, then nothing for months, then hot and heavy again for a few weeks, said they were pushing a waiver for flight time, then nothing, now and then I'll get a phone call from recruiter asking if I've been hired yet, I just laugh...each time he said he'll push the issue again and expect to hear back. I gave up. From what I understand, once you're a UAS driver, you're stuck, no chance of flying manned aircraft, because nobody wants it...not in the most desirable places either..I was told expect Sierra Vista. I'm happy in B100s. If anybody is looking, my company needs pilots, we have king air 100s, 350s and metros, 90/90 rotations.
 

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#89
Everyone in CBP is aware of the problems, but most of the problems are Congressionally mandated. At least now they’ll waive the poly if you have a current SSBI.
As of last year, one of the hiring managers said they were pushing for SECRET to also be exempt, but I have no update. I'm sure I'll learn more at HeliExpo. Interestingly, last year, CBP had a presence at the Mil-to-Civ transition seminar, but this year, they're actually presenting.
 

picklesuit

Living the GeoBachelor dream...
pilot
Contributor
#90
What’s the trip up on the poly? People lying or just having shit in your past? Do they require Boy Scouts who never broke a law or just someone that hasn’t smuggled too many humans across the border this week?
 
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