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Crossing the finish line... running, walking or crawling... (Reserve Retirement Process)

Gatordev

Well-Known Member
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
#63
My career has inspired junior FTS pilots to seek my path.........which is immediately crushed by anyone they talk to in the FTS community (including me).
 
#64
Thats the plan. Setup two more appointments (at different offices) and left a message with the accounts corrections department at PERS 912 as I was told at the CAC office DEERs has no record of the retirement being approved and in the DEERs software / system.
 

Hair Warrior

JO 1835
Contributor
#65
https://www.navytimes.com/news/your...-digging-out-of-reservist-retirement-backlog/
“I started out in my career in Surface Warfare. When a ship runs aground, or more recently as we have seen crashes into another one, a CO gets booted. That is the way it is. At Navy Personnel Command, their job is to take care of sailors. When they don’t as in here it should be no damned different.” - LCDR Randy Sowinski, USN-Ret.
New personal hero for everyone who has, or has ever had, a NOSC.
 
#70
It just like social security or anything else. It can't be assumed that every individual wants to draw it out as soon as eligible. They can't make it an automatic process.
Is that right? I could be wrong, but I think this analogy falls apart. First, there’s a range of ages/benefits for social security (earlier, but with lower payments, later with higher ones, etc..but there’s no advantage to waiting for your reserve retirement, is there? Also, it still seems like a waste to verify your retirement points when you enter the “grey zone” then do it again when you start getting paid. Couldn’t they look and see it had all been verified and then push the pay?
 
#71
Is that right? I could be wrong, but I think this analogy falls apart. First, there’s a range of ages/benefits for social security (earlier, but with lower payments, later with higher ones, etc..but there’s no advantage to waiting for your reserve retirement, is there?
It depends on the individual. The more points you have, the higher your pay. Typically, you get more points by staying in longer. In the case of a SELRES (and in theory, IRR, too), you give yourself more opportunity to promote, which would also result in higher pay.

So a person has to decide, for example, as O4 to take pay at 20 qualifying years. Or maybe they are a"critical" designator and the option is there to stay til 24. Do you take that option? Maybe you hit O5 in those extra years. Now as O5 you could go to 28 years...do you retire after TIG as O5 or continue til 28?

If you made it an automatic process at 20, you're bound to upset someone.

I do think it's somewhat similar to SS, as far as the concept of holding off and potentially getting higher pay. You're just substituting rank/points (O4 with 4500 points) for age (62) which is pay amount X *or* O4 with 5000 points vs SS @ 67 for pay amount Y *or* O5 with 5500 points vs SS @ 70 for amount Z(pulling example out of thin air!).

For some individuals, there may not be an advantage. Some are more interested in healthcare than pay, so they are not trying to max out points. There are some who maximize their reserve points every year at 130, others who just meet the minimum.

For me, I feel if the reserves doesn't interfere too much with the civilian job and family and I can still do the PFA, I'd stay til they boot me out to get as many points as possible!
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
#72
It depends on the individual. The more points you have, the higher your pay. Typically, you get more points by staying in longer. In the case of a SELRES (and in theory, IRR, too), you give yourself more opportunity to promote, which would also result in higher pay.

So a person has to decide, for example, as O4 to take pay at 20 qualifying years. Or maybe they are a"critical" designator and the option is there to stay til 24. Do you take that option? Maybe you hit O5 in those extra years. Now as O5 you could go to 28 years...do you retire after TIG as O5 or continue til 28?

If you made it an automatic process at 20, you're bound to upset someone.

I do think it's somewhat similar to SS, as far as the concept of holding off and potentially getting higher pay. You're just substituting rank/points (O4 with 4500 points) for age (62) which is pay amount X *or* O4 with 5000 points vs SS @ 67 for pay amount Y *or* O5 with 5500 points vs SS @ 70 for amount Z(pulling example out of thin air!).

For some individuals, there may not be an advantage. Some are more interested in healthcare than pay, so they are not trying to max out points. There are some who maximize their reserve points every year at 130, others who just meet the minimum.

For me, I feel if the reserves doesn't interfere too much with the civilian job and family and I can still do the PFA, I'd stay til they boot me out to get as many points as possible!
No. The scenario above is not on point. Once you are done you are done. If you are retired and in the grey zone there is NO reason not to start retired pay when eligible. You will not opt for the points you had at O-5 and 20 years if you went to 25. And the hassle isn't even sending an email or letter saying "begin now". It is the pages of paperwork to include, as mentioned above, confirming your points. YOU have to provided the details, or specifically say you will take whatever the Navy has on file be damned if it is right. The system is indefensible.
 
#73
No. The scenario above is not on point. Once you are done you are done. If you are retired and in the grey zone there is NO reason not to start retired pay when eligible. You will not opt for the points you had at O-5 and 20 years if you went to 25. And the hassle isn't even sending an email or letter saying "begin now". It is the pages of paperwork to include, as mentioned above, confirming your points. YOU have to provided the details, or specifically say you will take whatever the Navy has on file be damned if it is right. The system is indefensible.
Ok. We are actually both correct.

If the Navy is done with the member and they are essentially "putting you out", then, yes, done is done.

I wasn't speaking towards that piece, but that is true. I am also not referring to going in retirement, going into the grey zone and trying to walk it back.

I am referring to those that have the option, as the member, to go beyond 20 if they desire, prior to making a retirement decision.

The question, I believe, was why someone wouldn't want to take retirement as soon as eligible (and the soonest, under legacy, is 20 qualifying years). Not to be confused with the actual age you draw pay, which for most is 60 years old, unless you have qualifying active time as a reservist to reduce that age (the minimum being age 50 to draw pay). No, there is no reason to not draw your pay at 60. But there could be a reason to stay beyond 20 qualifying to have a larger paycheck when you do actually draw the pay. Hope that clears up what I'm trying to state.

Retirement Pay = Points / 360 * .025 * Base Pay for your rank (3 year average prior to your ability to draw pay)

Higher points = higher pay, which is achievable if the member has the option to Stay Navy beyond 20.
 
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#74
New member here and have a question -
So I think I've done my 20 yrs (12 yrs AD + 2 yrs active reserves + 6 yrs IRR) as of April 2018, but I've never received that letter telling me I'm good to go. I also can't get a hold of my points record (or is it called a statement of service? what is it called?). I sent the faxed request to PER912 about 6 weeks ago and not heard anything. I did verify they "logged" in my request but as you all may know they are apparently months behind in getting their jobs done. Tried to get onto ebenefits to print it out and that was a fail.

How long after you hit 20 did any of you get that letter saying you are eligible for retirement?

Any suggestions as to what to do next? I don't want to work on any points this year if I don't have to, but if I have to I realize I have to get started at some point.
 
#75
New member here and have a question -
So I think I've done my 20 yrs (12 yrs AD + 2 yrs active reserves + 6 yrs IRR) as of April 2018, but I've never received that letter telling me I'm good to go. I also can't get a hold of my points record (or is it called a statement of service? what is it called?). I sent the faxed request to PER912 about 6 weeks ago and not heard anything. I did verify they "logged" in my request but as you all may know they are apparently months behind in getting their jobs done. Tried to get onto ebenefits to print it out and that was a fail.

How long after you hit 20 did any of you get that letter saying you are eligible for retirement?

Any suggestions as to what to do next? I don't want to work on any points this year if I don't have to, but if I have to I realize I have to get started at some point.
Have you checked your ASOSH? It will show not only your total points, but also your number of "qualifying years towards retirement", otherwise known as 'good years'. Twenty years on the clock does not 20 good years make. I won't cover how points are accumulated/minimum points (see MILPERSMAN 1001-100). Suffice to say, make sure your math agrees with whatever version Millington is using.
 
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