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Stupid questions about the Rhino (Super Hornet)

flaps

happy to be here
None
Contributor
this sort of thing never changes . McDonnell Douglas proposed a super phantom for foreign users in the early '80's (digital flight controls,milti sensors, 1553 data bus avionics,fan engines, etc.). it was rejected for being too competitive with the eagle.
also, remember the f-20 and the j-79 powered f-16? , also proposed for export.

heck, for the price of 80 tomcats, the shah of iran would probably have been better served with 80 tomcats worth of f-5e's.

if good good enough wasn't good enough, it wouldn't be good enough but sometimes good enough isn't good enough.
 

Echo24

I'm Pilot.
pilot
Single seat or two seat super hornets

Is the navy buying more two seat super hornets now? Could someone explain the different rolls they both play, I mean if they do the same thing why would they have the two different versions? Are all the F-14 guys going to 2 seat hornets? I read in another post that the single seat guys where having problems with task saturation, if this is true why wouldnt they just all go to having goose in the back seat?
The big Navy is actually slimming down on the NFO service selection itself as it is streamlining all aircraft to be handled by one pilot and eventually the inevitable unmanned aircraft which we all dread. With the advancement in technology a single pilot can simply accomplish more tasks in the cockpit that were once too overwhelming and too cumbersome in the physical cockpit itself. It required an additional person and area to incorporate the radar and weapons systems (F-14). With the recession of mechanical cockpits in leu of modern day electronic cockpits the pilot can have much more information and tasks with less space taken up within the cockpit. (TGP, Radar, Engine gauges can all be viewed with the flipping of the MFD tabs).

Therefore with the reduction and compacting of systems within the cockpit there will no longer need to be an additional person in the aircraft. The benefits of an extra pair of eyes and brain in the cockpit are an intangible asset though which always needs to be taken into account.

Thanks!
 

Echo24

I'm Pilot.
pilot
In your efforts to be the knowledgable Midshipman to the rescue, you just succeeded in answer a question asked 6 years ago by someone who is now a winged aviator in a fleet squadron. Congrats and keep up the good work!
Hahaha! I noticed it after I replied! This forum was on the whats new link and I shamefully fell into reading all the posts without checking the date. Forgive my noobness.
 

ea6bflyr

Working Class Bum
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The big Navy is actually slimming down on the NFO service selection itself as it is streamlining all aircraft to be handled by one pilot and eventually the inevitable unmanned aircraft which we all dread. With the advancement in technology a single pilot can simply accomplish more tasks in the cockpit that were once too overwhelming and too cumbersome in the physical cockpit itself. It required an additional person and area to incorporate the radar and weapons systems (F-14). With the recession of mechanical cockpits in leu of modern day electronic cockpits the pilot can have much more information and tasks with less space taken up within the cockpit. (TGP, Radar, Engine gauges can all be viewed with the flipping of the MFD tabs).

Therefore with the reduction and compacting of systems within the cockpit there will no longer need to be an additional person in the aircraft. The benefits of an extra pair of eyes and brain in the cockpit are an intangible asset though which always needs to be taken into account.

Thanks!
Not sure what qualifies you to make this statement.....btw, you replied to a post from 2006...WTF? Are you still a student?
 

mid1510

1370
The big Navy is actually slimming down on the NFO service selection itself as it is streamlining all aircraft to be handled by one pilot and eventually the inevitable unmanned aircraft which we all dread. With the advancement in technology a single pilot can simply accomplish more tasks in the cockpit that were once too overwhelming and too cumbersome in the physical cockpit itself. It required an additional person and area to incorporate the radar and weapons systems (F-14). With the recession of mechanical cockpits in leu of modern day electronic cockpits the pilot can have much more information and tasks with less space taken up within the cockpit. (TGP, Radar, Engine gauges can all be viewed with the flipping of the MFD tabs).

Therefore with the reduction and compacting of systems within the cockpit there will no longer need to be an additional person in the aircraft. The benefits of an extra pair of eyes and brain in the cockpit are an intangible asset though which always needs to be taken into account.

Thanks!
Wow dude, as a fellow 1/c MIDN, I'm surprised you think you can make flat out assumptions like you did. They definitely did not "slim down" NFO selection. It's been around 85 each for ROTC and USNA for years now. The Navy needs NFOs. Clearly you're forgetting the Growler/Prowler and the E-2C/D, not to mention the fact that the Rhino is projected to serve until 2032. Add the P-3/8's to that list. You should at least know that the F-35 is only replacing the A-C single-seat legacy Hornets.

Do yourself a favor and read the Naval Aviation Vision. You can find it online.
 

cfam

A pilot is a pilot. An NFO is something else.
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
well shit..guess I should start looking for a new line of work
 
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