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Hydronephrosis

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Wildcat15

Guest
Hi All,

I've employed the use of the search function to no avail on this issue. It's an uncommon medical issue so I'm hoping someone with a little authority can provide some insight. On a different message board I posted an inquiry about having a history of hydronephrosis due to UPJ obstruction and the information I got was that if it was rectified as an infant it was regularly waivered. I had the surgery three years ago to fix the problem because I had onset symptoms later in life. I provided my recruiter with the entire paper trail of all the appointments leading up to my surgery, the surgery notes, and a post-op renal scan. My kidney function has dramatically improved to normal levels as experienced by healthy people. My surgeon notes; however, that I will likely show signs of chronic hydronephrosis due to the fact that I unknowingly had a UPJO. Aside from that he notes I am perfectly healthy, show no signs of sequelae, have perfectly operational kidneys, and that due to a successful surgery I have no possibility of recurring blockage. I'm hoping a medical waiver is a possibility but considering the fact the hydronephrosis is a PDQ, I'm not sure they will consider my recent health and successful surgery as enough to approve it.

I'll bullet it for clarity
  • Hydronephrosis
  • Surgery as an adult
  • Post-op perfect health / successful surgery
  • History of hydronephrosis likely to plague medical history
  • Can't find definitive answer about waiver possibilities
  • Recruiter unfamiliar with condition/waiver success
  • Have exhausted paper trail - no more to provide to Navy
My question is; Has anyone experienced similar conditions/waivers?

Is there anything else I can do to increase the chances of approval? (Surgeon did not recommend another renal scan as the first post-op one showed normal kidney function)

If my waiver is denied and I have no more paperwork to put forth, is that the end of the road for military service (in a Officer role) for me?

Thank you all very much for your time, as always any insight you can provide is appreciated. I hope you all are having a great day.
 

TimeBomb

Noise, vibration and harshness
Wildcat,
As you note, per DODI 6130.03, current hydronephrosis or a history of hydronephrosis is disqualifying for initial entry into military service (commissioning and enlistment), as is a history of urinary tract reconstructive surgery. I would be surprised if your conditions will warrant a medical wavier. While your renal function may be normal now, there is the possibility that your affected kidney has sustained some damage from the long term partial obstruction that could result in an accelerated course of decline in renal function as you get older.

The only time I've seen a waiver denial reversed is when new information is provided. I don't see how you can provide new information as you can't change the fact that you've had a disqualifying surgical procedure for a disqualifying condition.

Sorry to say, but since the Navy doesn't have any real time or money invested in you at this point, there is little incentive to take on any degree of medical risk when there is a known, preexisting condition.
R/
 
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Wildcat15

Guest
Thanks for the reply, I truly appreciate it. I haven't put in for a waiver yet, are you saying I won't even be able to apply for one?

Thank you.
 

TimeBomb

Noise, vibration and harshness
Any disqualifying medical condition can, in theory, receive a waiver. Submit all your available information with your application for commissioning and see what plays out.

The probability of receiving a waiver for a disqualifying condition depends on many factors, one of which is where the waiver applicant is in the pipeline. Disqualifying medical conditions are generally more likely to be waived as the more experience in the Navy the applicant has. Applicants for initial entry into the military have the lowest chance of receiving a waiver, since you have your entire potential career in front of you, and the Navy doesn't want to take the chance on bringing you in, giving you a whole lot of expensive training, only to have your condition prematurely terminate your career and potentially result in the Navy being on the hook for your medical care costs for the rest of your natural life.
R/
 

fieldrat

Fully Qualified 1815
@Wildcat15, try and submit for the waiver. Yes, big Navy is trying to cover it's bases by limiting long-term financial exposure. However, you could be totally 100% fine (wrt renal function) in the long term and only cost the Navy money for your back/knees/sleep apnea/facial folliculitis in 20 years. Hopefully you have an OR willing to push until told "NO", on paper, and a medical reviewer who actually asks for a test to confirm the results provided by your civilian medical records.

If I'm not allowed to fly, someone should get my slot.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the reply, I truly appreciate it. I haven't put in for a waiver yet, are you saying I won't even be able to apply for one?

Thank you.
You should be able to put in for a waiver and it should look something like this.

documents submitted to MEPS for MEPS review
MEPS will give you a PDQ
NRD will submit documents to N3M for courtesy review
If N3M says "continued processing is warranted" then you go to MEPS and get a physical, after which N3M gets copies of your physical and makes a call whether you are PQ or not.
If N3M says "continued processing not warranted" then you are done.
 
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Wildcat15

Guest
Thank you all for the replies. I am trying to offer my recruiter the most accurate and expeditious information I can to make it easier on him. He said the new civilian doctor at MEPS has been "busting his fucking balls" (his words) with every applicant. I will keep you all apprised of the situation and update this thread just in case there is some poor schmuck like me in the future. I hope I have a chance at a career in the Navy. Also, if there is anything I can do to make this easier on my recruiter that I may not be aware of I am open to suggestions.

Thanks again everybody. Hope you're all having a great evening.
 

FormerRecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
Per the MANMED: "(I 0) Current or history of hydronephrosis ( 591) is disqualifying." It doesn't say anything about a waiver. If I was your recruiter I would have stopped it right there.

@NavyOffRec might have a different policy but if you've been diagnosed with that condition I wouldn't have even moved further with the process.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
Per the MANMED: "(I 0) Current or history of hydronephrosis ( 591) is disqualifying." It doesn't say anything about a waiver. If I was your recruiter I would have stopped it right there.

@NavyOffRec might have a different policy but if you've been diagnosed with that condition I wouldn't have even moved further with the process.
I would have told the applicant it was disqualifying but if he wanted to get all the paperwork and do all the work I would submit, however given what I can see it would probably still be a no, often after that a person doesn't want to move forward. I would invest minimal time.
 
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Wildcat15

Guest
Per the MANMED: "(I 0) Current or history of hydronephrosis ( 591) is disqualifying." It doesn't say anything about a waiver. If I was your recruiter I would have stopped it right there.

@NavyOffRec might have a different policy but if you've been diagnosed with that condition I wouldn't have even moved further with the process.
Although MANMED does say is it disqualifying, article 15-31 outlines waivers of the physical standards for all conditions listed.

  1. For some applicants, their current level of functioning and/or state of health in spite of the presence of a disqualifying medical condition warrants a waiver of the standards.
  2. Waivers of the standards do not make an applicant "physically qualified" but rather provide the applicant the opportunity to enlist or commission despite the fact that a disqualifying condition exists.
 
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Wildcat15

Guest
often after that a person doesn't want to move forward
After the NRD submits the paperwork to N3M, isn't that the end of the road (assuming it is denied)? Considering I don't have anything else of substance to submit I have to imagine I cannot move much further along in the process? I apologize for my ignorance, unfortunately the more information I get the more bleak the future seems to be. I am clinging to the smallest chance I have... For what it's worth I would exhaust every opportunity I could get.
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
After the NRD submits the paperwork to N3M, isn't that the end of the road (assuming it is denied)? Considering I don't have anything else of substance to submit I have to imagine I cannot move much further along in the process? I apologize for my ignorance, unfortunately the more information I get the more bleak the future seems to be. I am clinging to the smallest chance I have... For what it's worth I would exhaust every opportunity I could get.
If N3M says no that is basically it.
 

TimeBomb

Noise, vibration and harshness
The MANMED reference is the basis by which waivers are granted for applicants with disqualifying conditions. Waivers are recommended by medical, and approved by the line. PM me if you want or need more details on this process.

You mentioned that you were interested in SNA. If N3M grants a waiver of physical standards for your conditions, that waiver only applies to commissioning. If you want aviation, NAMI will get involved as they are the waiver recommending authority for aviation. The waiver granted by N3M that got you in the door doesn't have any bearing on NAMI's recommendation. Aviation standards are more strict than those for general commissioning. So, while you may have a waiver to get in the door, there is still a second level of medical review that will be necessary for aviation.
R/
 

exNavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
The MANMED reference is the basis by which waivers are granted for applicants with disqualifying conditions. Waivers are recommended by medical, and approved by the line. PM me if you want or need more details on this process.

You mentioned that you were interested in SNA. If N3M grants a waiver of physical standards for your conditions, that waiver only applies to commissioning. If you want aviation, NAMI will get involved as they are the waiver recommending authority for aviation. The waiver granted by N3M that got you in the door doesn't have any bearing on NAMI's recommendation. Aviation standards are more strict than those for general commissioning. So, while you may have a waiver to get in the door, there is still a second level of medical review that will be necessary for aviation.
R/
N3M would put a phrase on the letters that would say something like "N3M defers to NAMI for qualification of aviation programs"

During my time as an OR I only saw the line not take N3M recommendations a few times (3 that stand out), 2 were for vision on sub nukes, and 1 was for a SEAL candidate, who was initially DQ due to counseling when he was like 10 due to a family divorce, he happened to impress a SEAL O-6 during an interview.
 
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Wildcat15

Guest
Just an update for anyone in the future looking for information regarding any urinary tract or kidney issues, my waiver for hydronephrosis was denied by N3M. My recruiter hasn't forwarded me the letter yet but he said they noted the paperwork I submitted was inconclusive to determine whether or not I would be fit for service. Not sure what that means, but as of now I am going to pin my ears back and pursue more testing on my condition that will hopefully yield some favorable results.
 
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