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Help Improving Pushup Score

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
This is what I came up with:
Not enough compound lifts (where are your deadlifts? overhead press? Why leg press instead of squats? Why lat pulldown instead of pullups?) and too much accessory work for a routine like that (not that accessory work is bad per se, but if you're going for a full body workout 2x a week then curls aren't giving you the bang for your buck).

Why would you make up a routine when there are several proven beginner routines available on the internet?

I personally like something like this: http://www.muscleandstrength.com/workouts/3day-beginners-workout.html, except you have to get to the gym 6 days a week to do it (I know the site says 3 but that's hogwash if you're doing a split like that. 3 days is fine for like the first 2 weeks to get started, but then you're going to want to transition to hitting each muscle 2x week, which means going to the gym 6 days to do this).

However, there are many fitness people who would advocate ditching isolation exercises entirely and just focusing on compound lifts on 3 day workout schedule, but only two different workouts. For me, that seemed like too little work. But YMMV. Something like this: http://www.fitnesspillars.com/weightlifting_routine_for_beginners.html

Although I would personally either replace tricep extensions with dips or add dips to the A day, and replace curls with pullups or add pullups to the B day's workout, and do all exercises for 3 sets vice 1. The advantage of the above is you only need to go to the gym 3-4x a week to hit everything.
 
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alaurin

All day, every day!
Spekkio, Good points and great links. Why does the fitness model (for targeted muscle groups) look like a gorilla? (http://www.muscleandstrength.com/sites/all/themes/mns/images/taxonomy/exercises/musclegroups/Triceps.png)

If you start doing compound lifts and haven't done them before, be careful with the form. It's very easy to mess up your body with lifting wrong, as it is with doing anything wrong. I'd probably throw in heel raises to prevent shin splints and other foot/calf injuries. The only other thing I can think of is maybe some hanging leg raises or roman chair leg raises (the funny looking seat with no bottom). Also you can raise your legs on the roman chair or from a hang up to waist level (knees bent) and rotate from side to side if you so desire.

You might find it beneficial to do a PFT test for yourself every two weeks or so as a measure of your progress. And of course, you should practice doing situps/pushups on a regular basis during the week, possibly as part of your weight lifting regimen.
 
You might find it beneficial to do a PFT test for yourself every two weeks or so as a measure of your progress. And of course, you should practice doing situps/pushups on a regular basis during the week, possibly as part of your weight lifting regimen.
These two things have been beneficial. Practice running the full PRT by Navy standard and you'll (hopefully) track good progress. When I first started I targeted getting into the Good zone - and then move up from there. "What gets measured gets better." And what better way to get better at push-ups than by doing push-ups?
 

NRDPortlandOR

New Member
Haven't read through the entire thread, but I'll give you some advice based on what worked for me.

Ever since my first PRT back in Fall 2006, by PB was never more than 75. No matter what I did, I'd get between 70-75 each PRT. I tried push up regiments and work outs and nothing helped.

Then when I got out I started lifting weights moderately at the gym. Standard chest work outs, nothing too crazy. Fast forward a year later when I was back in, my unit had a PRT two weeks after my start date (that I was totally unaware of). I showed up that day and maxed. Hadn't done a push up in a year. I've maxed push ups the last few cycles just off a 1x per week chest workout. I still work on form every now and then, but for the most part, I never do any push ups. Improving my strength was key.

Hope this helps.
 
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