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Career advancement in Supply

zab1001

Well-Known Member
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
So when you said you "did a search" did you find an official definition of the term "Foreign Service" as it pertains to the USN? Not being facetious, I'd like to know.
 

helolumpy

Region staff is the 7th level of hell!
pilot
Contributor
In the FAQ section of Navy.com is this question: http://www.navy.com/faq.html

CAN I EXPLORE NEW FIELDS OUTSIDE OF THE JOB FOR WHICH I RECEIVE TRAINING?
Absolutely! Once you’ve served at least one tour in your designated field (Pilot, Naval Flight Officer, Intelligence, etc.) the opportunities open up. Here is just a sampling of the many opportunities available to Fleet-experienced Officers: Engineering Duty Officer, Public Affairs, Fleet Support, Recruiting, Space Command, Space and Electronic Warfare, Joint and Foreign Service, and staff positions.

The OP posted; "I wanted to transfer to "Joint & Foreign Service" after a few years in the service but not sure being in Supply will let me do that because Supply Corps is listed under "restricted line".

My first response was the Foreign Service is a term that applies to a State Department Official http://careers.state.gov/officer so it was not an option if he goes into the Supply Corps.

The OP responded that he read on the Navy FAQ page the term Joint and Foreign Service. At which point I responded that what the webpage means is overseas tours. So while the Navy used the term "Foreign Service" on their FAQ page, that term has a specific meaning which I interpreted as his desire to try to become a Foreign Service Officer.

The OP then posted that he may be interested in an Attache job and I responded that I haven't heard of Supply Corps Officers doing Attache jobs, all the ones I know were URL. The OP would need to do some research WRT to SuppO's doing an Embassy tour.

The only definition close to "foreign service" that I've found is:

JP 1-02 - Foreign service national. (DOD) Foreign nationals who provide clerical, administrative, technical, fiscal, and other support at foreign service posts abroad and are not citizens of the United States. The term includes third country nationals who are individuals employed by a United States mission abroad and are neither a citizen of the United States nor of the country to which assigned for duty. Also called FSN.

NTRP 1-02 does not have a specific definition for 'Foreign Service'.

That being said, I would say there is not formal definition for the term.
 

Gman91

New Member
As a person advances in the supply corps from 0-1 t0 0-2 and so on and so fourth, what security clearance do you possess and at what rank does it go to a top-secret clearance level?
 

BackOrdered

Well-Known Member
Contributor
As a person advances in the supply corps from 0-1 t0 0-2 and so on and so fourth, what security clearance do you possess and at what rank does it go to a top-secret clearance level?
Secret. At the 5 year mark you will have to get a SSBI. You won't hold TS unless your job inherently has you deal with TS materials (SEAL team SUPPO, Subs etc).
 

vladivostok391

Lieutenant, U.S. Navy
My understanding, if this helps clarify part of your question, is this: Supply Corps Officers are not "line" officers but "staff corps" officers. They can hold command within their community (no sea command though). Pilots, SWOs and those types are "unrestricted line" officers and basically can hold any command (at sea or otherwise). "Restricted line" officers (e.g. Intel and the like) cannot hold command at sea, but can hold various shore commands. The lines between some of these different types of officers tend to blur from what I've read, but that's basically how I understand it. Hope that helps clarify some things.

The cool thing about Supply Corps is, you are essentially attached to different communities (SEALs, subs, surface, etc) and therefore get a lot of great and diverse experiences that other officers don't get. I'm certainly no expert, but my wife was PROREC'd for Supply and I was PROREC'd for Intel, so we've been doing a lot of research on the differences, opportunities, etc. Anyway, for what it's worth, that's my two cents.
 

webmaster

The Grass is Greener!
pilot
Site Admin
Contributor
As a person advances in the supply corps from 0-1 t0 0-2 and so on and so fourth, what security clearance do you possess and at what rank does it go to a top-secret clearance level?
So GMAN, why are you asking what ranks and positions hold which security clearance? Is this an innocent question or are you trolling?
 
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