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What are you reading?

He's been published in the APA a handful of times. That would allow me to believe he's somewhat notable in the field.


Are you saying that social sciences like certain fields of Psychology are not based in research? Or are you saying that Peterson does no research?


No, that isn't how science works. The importance of a study isn't based on how much acclaim it gains. Thinking like this led to the replication crisis you mentioned previously. Science that reaffirms the status quote is just as important as a study that changes. Unfortunately, reaffirmation doesn't get all the headlines. Scientists who chased acclaim created weak experiments with the thought in mind to find "specific" results. That's why many studies have been replicated with differing results.

I'll play along though. This study, Between facets and domains: 10 aspects of the Big Five. Has been cited in a little over 900 other studies.
I'm saying if he was a notable social scientist, he'd be notable for that. Like your Zimbardos or Kinseys or Pavlov. But no one here has ever heard of his research. Because it's not very original or groundbreaking or interesting.

He's only notable because of his pseudo-scientific mythological/philosophical drivel that's capitalized on the rise of reactionary pop-psychology in the current cultural zeitgeist.

Once again, you were the one who posited that he was a "good social scientist."
 
Apologize in advance for the shameless plug....I am reading a book written by......well.......me. I am the adopted child of a WWII era Naval Aviator who grew up in Pensacola. I recently researched my birth family and found I was the actual son of a early 1960's era Marine Aviator. A look into how to conduct genealogy research, as well a look at the world of the post WWII south.
https://www.amazon.com/Where-Come-M...id=1529882889&sr=1-1&keywords=Matthew+l+evans
 
If you like Naval History you should read everything that Hornfischer and Toll write. Both are great authors and their works are very approachable and enjoyable.
Thanks for the tip. Seems that they'll be a good place to start.

In the meantime, I'm reading I Should Be Extremely Happy In Your Company, a novel of Lewis & Clark (beautifully written, like a brook flowing over smooth granite stones), and Under a Glass Bell, a collection of short stories by Anaïs Nin.
 
Thanks for the tip. Seems that they'll be a good place to start.

In the meantime, I'm reading I Should Be Extremely Happy In Your Company, a novel of Lewis & Clark (beautifully written, like a brook flowing over smooth granite stones), and Under a Glass Bell, a collection of short stories by Anaïs Nin.
The Lewis and Clark book sounds interesting. I think I'd actually really like that!
 

Griz882

Well-Known Member
pilot
Another $1 local library used book grab. The book is just a series of stories that run across the history of aircraft carrier aviation. Some stories are from aviators, some from crew. There are lots of interesting little historical bits of information (such as noting that the co-pilot of the RAF PBY that found the Battleship Bismarck was a US naval aviator on an exchange tour and wasn't supposed to be participating in combat operations). Fun read with some good stories.

Carier Book.jpg
 
Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600 - 1947. It explains how the territory of Brandenburg (only slightly larger than the state of Maryland in the beginning) came to hold so much power.
iron_kingdom.jpg
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States: A Speculative Novel.

If you can put aside your politics and read it, it's disturbingly plausible. The author has a few missteps here and there, like talking about someone's "Article 92 hearing" when they're court-martialed. But it hearkens back to 104 years ago: what happens when the international system is set up to the point that misunderstandings and confusion end up leading somewhere nobody involved would have thought possible?
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
The 2020 Commission Report on the North Korean Nuclear Attacks Against the United States: A Speculative Novel.

If you can put aside your politics and read it, it's disturbingly plausible. The author has a few missteps here and there, like talking about someone's "Article 92 hearing" when they're court-martialed. But it hearkens back to 104 years ago: what happens when the international system is set up to the point that misunderstandings and confusion end up leading somewhere nobody involved would have thought possible?
Jeffery Lewis is a pretty smart guy when it comes to missiles and nukes, I might have to actually buy that one to see if his book is as good as the rest of his work.
 

nittany03

FUBIJAR
pilot
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
Jeffery Lewis is a pretty smart guy when it comes to missiles and nukes, I might have to actually buy that one to see if his book is as good as the rest of his work.
He goes a little heavy-handed with his portrayal of Trump's fictional character, to the point of borderline satire. That takes away from his larger point, for the sake of partisan bickering; if he was going for satire, he really didn't need to. But his larger point remains, if a bit inartfully made in the details.
 
Presently reading a book about VA-75 in Vietnam called Launch the Intruders: A Naval Attack Squadron in the Vietnam War, 1972. It's written by Carol Reardon, a military history professor at Penn State. Fantastic book, incredibly well researched by way of both oral histories from squadron members and actual documentation and military records.
 

Flash

SEVAL/ECMO
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
He goes a little heavy-handed with his portrayal of Trump's fictional character, to the point of borderline satire. That takes away from his larger point, for the sake of partisan bickering; if he was going for satire, he really didn't need to. But his larger point remains, if a bit inartfully made in the details.
His specialty is technical stuff, from what you say he probably should have stuck closer to that.
 
Presently reading a book about VA-75 in Vietnam called Launch the Intruders: A Naval Attack Squadron in the Vietnam War, 1972. It's written by Carol Reardon, a military history professor at Penn State. Fantastic book, incredibly well researched by way of both oral histories from squadron members and actual documentation and military records.
Next on my list is probably one called Carrier Combat, which was written by Lt. Frederick Mears of VT-8 and published posthumously in 1944 after his death in a crash. The book has been out of print since the 40s and I managed to get a hold of the head of USNI press and said that while he was well aware of the book, the rights were unclear and they wouldn't be reprinting the book anytime soon. A damn shame. My copy is a 1st edition from 1944.

Mears survived Midway because he was with most of the rest of the squadron at Hawaii rather than with the detachments aboard Hornet or Midway Island. Mears would fly at Guadalcanal and survive, but be killed stateside when the Avenger he was flying entered a dive he was unable to pull out of.
 
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