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Your HDTV thoughts....

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
The real cost buster is perpetually renting HDTV boxes. They're $15-20/mo each and then taxes and fees on top of that. Load of bullshit that you can't buy your own like you can buy modems.

Put a TV in the family room and 3 bedrooms and there's easily $100/mo after all the taxes and fees just going to equipment rental.

I still am holding out on one TV in a family of 5, but lots of homes have that kind of setup.
That’s a fair point. I only have one TV and my kids are no longer in the house. If I wanted a TV in every room the cost would be much more.
 

squorch2

he will die without safety brief
pilot
Sling does me right for CFB.

no contracts, integrates with apple’s tv ecosystem, carries pretty much every game, all for a reasonable cost.
 

bubblehead

Registered Member
Contributor
I have no cable or HD boxes. I got a good HD Over the Air (OTA) antenna and easily pick up over 60 channels from three different towers. HD content is pumped to the TV's vial the coax connection.

If you want to get fancy, you can connect the coax to a SiliconDust HDHomeRun hardware transcoder and then install PLEX on a server or computer. This will allow you to record the free HD OTA content, as well as to watch everything that is recorded or to watch live TV over your device.

If you do not want to have to run coax to all TV's, use the same set up as above, and install the PLEX app on an Apple TV. The Apple TV PLEX app allows you to watch live tv that is pumped to it via the HDHomeRun. You can also watch all the recorded stuff. PLEX also removes commercials.

Comcast has some balls. They charge people for the same, free, HD content that is all OTA: free. They simply take those free HD OTA streams and pump them through their network and sell it as a "value add."
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
I use Plex via a Roku device to access content on my computer. I’m a big fan.
 

ChuckMK23

Instructor, Flight.
pilot
I tried cutting the cord, but after six months I realized I was paying almost the same to acquire the same services just in smaller bites to different streamers.
That's no accident! FTC/DOJ anti-trust folks are asleep at the wheel. Its ridiculous. Regulators need to regulate.

Start with a decent fiber optics based internet service. Add HDTV antennae to get the networks and PBS over the air. Go with your favorite streaming box - Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, etc. The key is to use shared streaming subscriptions from friends and family - HBO, Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu - so you are not paying. Ideally have an arrangement in your circle of friends and family where you legit purchase one service and share your credentials among 5-10 friends and family and they in turn do the same.

All the DVD's you own can be easily converted to digital files and shared from your computer to your TV via VLC or Plex as Brett mentioned - thats a great solution for things you enjoy repeatedly - your favorite Band of Brothers episodes, etc.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
That's no accident! FTC/DOJ anti-trust folks are asleep at the wheel. Its ridiculous. Regulators need to regulate.

Start with a decent fiber optics based internet service. Add HDTV antennae to get the networks and PBS over the air. Go with your favorite streaming box - Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire, etc. The key is to use shared streaming subscriptions from friends and family - HBO, Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu - so you are not paying. Ideally have an arrangement in your circle of friends and family where you legit purchase one service and share your credentials among 5-10 friends and family and they in turn do the same.

All the DVD's you own can be easily converted to digital files and shared from your computer to your TV via VLC or Plex as Brett mentioned - thats a great solution for things you enjoy repeatedly - your favorite Band of Brothers episodes, etc.
You've spent the bulk of your post arguing against your thesis statement.
 

Spekkio

He bowls overhand.
Comcast has some balls. They charge people for the same, free, HD content that is all OTA: free. They simply take those free HD OTA streams and pump them through their network and sell it as a "value add."
Not really.

Comcast gets charged a certain amount to carry each station, even the ones that are normally free OTA. They then do a cost calculation based on those fees, all the other costs of delivering service to customers, and how many subscribers they expect to have and out comes your cable bill. Many of the heavy hitters are regional sports networks - your cable bill is funding professional sport team payrolls regardless of whether or not you attend a game, particularly in 'big markets.'

That's no accident! FTC/DOJ anti-trust folks are asleep at the wheel. Its ridiculous. Regulators need to regulate.
I can hardly blame big cable and internet providers for wising up and charging more for those people who only choose to get internet. Additionally, all of those streaming services have the same pay-for-rights-to-distribute challenge as cable companies. The more content they carry, the more expensive the service gets.

If you're talking about cutting the cord without violating any terms of service (ie password sharing) or copyright laws (e.g. downloading content for free), the bulk of the savings is going to be in how many HDTV boxes you're no longer renting.

My personal biggest beef with Cable TV, which is the fault of the stations and not of any particular provider, is the endless loop of 1-3 shows on the majority of stations, many of which are syndicated re-runs. For example, if you like reruns of Spongebob Squarepants you'll watch Nickelodeon. If you don't, you won't, because that's what's playing on that channel the vast majority of the time. I'm curious how they arrive at the decision to do that, since I'm sure people who even like a particular show get tired of watching it over and over again, but here we are.
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
I tried cutting the cord, but after six months I realized I was paying almost the same to acquire the same services just in smaller bites to different streamers. In any case, the internet connection is always where the real money goes. I am impressed by people who say they do it and say they have slashed costs.
When Comcast jumped our rate up to almost $200 (internet and cable TV) is when we said enough. Dropped cable TV, bought our own modem and a Roku for each TV. $60 per month for internet, $21 per month for the streaming service www.Philo.com (58 channels) and $13 per month for Netflix. Quite pleased with what we have and not going back.

Over the air has been good. The addition of the multiple digital channels (i.e., 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, etc) allows a lot more channels. In addition to the standard ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, FOX, we pick up a lot of specialty channels (international news channels, sci-fi channel, western channel, and such oldies channels as Antenna TV, Cozi TV and MeTV for the Rockford Files, MASH, Hogan's Heroes, etc.) You can take a look at something like www.tvfool.com to see what is in your area.

For example, if you like reruns of Spongebob Squarepants you'll watch Nickelodeon. If you don't, you won't, because that's what's playing on that channel the vast majority of the time. I'm curious how they arrive at the decision to do that, since I'm sure people who even like a particular show get tired of watching it over and over again, but here we are.
Nice thing about Philo is that it brings up all seasons of SpongeBob (it is big on our rotation). And if you listen closely, sometimes you can hear music from NFL Films in the episodes.
 

ABMD

Pork Chop
When Comcast jumped our rate up to almost $200 (internet and cable TV) is when we said enough. Dropped cable TV, bought our own modem and a Roku for each TV. $60 per month for internet, $21 per month for the streaming service www.Philo.com (58 channels) and $13 per month for Netflix. Quite pleased with what we have and not going back.

Over the air has been good. The addition of the multiple digital channels (i.e., 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, etc) allows a lot more channels. In addition to the standard ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, FOX, we pick up a lot of specialty channels (international news channels, sci-fi channel, western channel, and such oldies channels as Antenna TV, Cozi TV and MeTV for the Rockford Files, MASH, Hogan's Heroes, etc.) You can take a look at something like www.tvfool.com to see what is in your area.
I did the same thing. When that cable bill went from the introductory rate to the standard rate I dropped the cable company, bought a digital antenna and used a family members NetFlix and Amazon account for streaming. Saving $180/month. With a family of 7, we manage just fine with 1 TV.
 

Tycho_Brohe

Well-Known Member
pilot
Contributor
As far as the TV gouge at the start of this thread goes, obviously a whole lot has changed in a decade. I'm replacing my 7-year-old Sharp 1080p 55" 60Hz with a 4K 65" Samsung QLED. One of the things that was discussed in the early posts was refresh rate, and that was an important aspect for my choice of which TV to buy, since I'll be using my TV as basically a giant PC monitor as well.

As far as the terminology goes when shopping for TV's, motion rate =/= refresh rate. Motion rate refers to interpolation to give shows what's commonly referred to as the "soap opera effect," where shows look surreally smooth. That doesn't apply as much to PC or console gaming; the refresh rate is the more important metric for that, and that's usually half of the advertised motion rate. So for example, my new TV has Motion Rate 240Hz, and its native refresh rate is 120Hz, meaning that for gaming purposes, it can display up to 120 fps (with the exception of 4K which is 60Hz, and therefore 60 fps).

Another feature I was looking for is Freesync support, which allows the GPU to control the refresh rate of the monitor and prevent tearing. Freesync is currently compatible with Xbox 1X/S and all AMD Radeon video cards; if you have Nvidia, you'd look for G-Sync support instead, but I doubt many TV's will have this, especially the DisplayPort input required for G-Sync, and any TV's that do are probably too expensive to bother with it. Input lag was also a consideration; I used RTings to check which of the TV's I was already looking at also had low input lag. Samsung's QLED line, as well as their NU-series which is the next price tier down, ticked all the boxes for me. I got a 65" Q7F from last year, which was $1050 at the NEX, surprisingly cheaper than any other retailer, even before taxes.

Anyway, pivoting back to the current topic, I'm starting to get curious about this whole Plex server idea. Is there a way to rip my old library of DVD's with upscaling? It's been a while since I messed around with Handbrake, but my main concern is that 480i will look shitty even on my phone nowadays.
 

SynixMan

Staff Life
pilot
Contributor
Anyway, pivoting back to the current topic, I'm starting to get curious about this whole Plex server idea. Is there a way to rip my old library of DVD's with upscaling? It's been a while since I messed around with Handbrake, but my main concern is that 480i will look shitty even on my phone nowadays.
I have a Synology NAS with two 6TB drives that I use to run my plex server. Was about $600 all said and done. I've been pretty happy with it. I stream via the Plex app on my TV, which decodes 4K HDR rips pretty easily.
 

Griz882

Livin' On the Right Side of the River From Pags!
pilot
Jesus guys...slow down!

My mind is barely past this...
.23095

And you guys are talking about Plex-e-giggamas and Scientology Naval Air Stations!
 

Randy Daytona

Cold War Relic
pilot
Super Moderator
For those who have a dedicated media room, any definite do's or don'ts? Looking at some different ideas now before remodeling, but curious to know what others have done.
 
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