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Starting the Process in Commissioning into the Navy

Tomsand

New Member
Hey everyone,

Since late last year, I've been looking into my options to become an Officer in the Navy. I am currently 20, and a Sophomore in College pursuing a BBA. I put in an application for the two-year NROTC scholarship this year, but after looking at the acceptance rates, I doubt I will get it. So, my focus has shifted to OCS. I have read around here on the forums, but what is the best date to contact an Officer Recruiter and get the ball rolling? Some have said 18 months prior, others 12 months prior to graduation. With a business degree, I think the Supply Corps would be best suited for me, correct? Although I am still eligible for SWO, NFO, and NA? I am also a dual citizen, American & Spanish, and I have gotten conflicting answers on whether I will have to renounce my Spanish Citizenship or not. I talked to a SUPPO and he told me that it shouldn't be a problem, and others have told me the same, yet on the forums here, everyone has seemingly had to give it up for security clearances. It's odd to me that you can be a political and hold public office while being a dual citizen, yet you cannot be an Officer and do the same. My father was a CT Chief in the Navy and married my mom while in, I don't know if that would help with clearance issues?

Is there anything I can do, besides getting physically ready, to start the process for submitting my OCS packet to the boards right now, two years out from graduating? My GPA is currently 3.1, so I know I will have to raise it, and luckily I have two more years of college to get it up.

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
Hey everyone,

Since late last year, I've been looking into my options to become an Officer in the Navy. I am currently 20, and a Sophomore in College pursuing a BBA. I put in an application for the two-year NROTC scholarship this year, but after looking at the acceptance rates, I doubt I will get it. So, my focus has shifted to OCS. I have read around here on the forums, but what is the best date to contact an Officer Recruiter and get the ball rolling? Some have said 18 months prior, others 12 months prior to graduation. With a business degree, I think the Supply Corps would be best suited for me, correct? Although I am still eligible for SWO, NFO, and NA? I am also a dual citizen, American & Spanish, and I have gotten conflicting answers on whether I will have to renounce my Spanish Citizenship or not. I talked to a SUPPO and he told me that it shouldn't be a problem, and others have told me the same, yet on the forums here, everyone has seemingly had to give it up for security clearances. It's odd to me that you can be a political and hold public office while being a dual citizen, yet you cannot be an Officer and do the same. My father was a CT Chief in the Navy and married my mom while in, I don't know if that would help with clearance issues?

Is there anything I can do, besides getting physically ready, to start the process for submitting my OCS packet to the boards right now, two years out from graduating? My GPA is currently 3.1, so I know I will have to raise it, and luckily I have two more years of college to get it up.

Thanks!
18 months. Your OR and a search around the forums can yield the answers to your questions.
 

Meyerkord

VT-27 (Primary)
With a business degree, I think the Supply Corps would be best suited for me, correct?
If Supply is the one you're most interested in, then yes. Don't choose something only because it matches your degree. That being said, Supply definitely does favor those with business/supply chain backgrounds, so you have an advantage there.

Although I am still eligible for SWO, NFO, and NA?
Yes
 

snake020

Well-Known Member
Contributor
I am also a dual citizen, American & Spanish, and I have gotten conflicting answers on whether I will have to renounce my Spanish Citizenship or not. I talked to a SUPPO and he told me that it shouldn't be a problem, and others have told me the same, yet on the forums here, everyone has seemingly had to give it up for security clearances.
When I came in, to commission you had to renounce any foreign citizenship. My understanding is the rules have changed and there are cases where you can hold dual citizenship and still get clearance:


You're better off discussing with an officer recruiter rather than the sea lawyers here though.
 

NavyOffRec

Well-Known Member
When I came in, to commission you had to renounce any foreign citizenship. My understanding is the rules have changed and there are cases where you can hold dual citizenship and still get clearance:


You're better off discussing with an officer recruiter rather than the sea lawyers here though.
If the OP uses the search function a bit more he will find that applicants still need to renounce citizenship if they are a dual citizen.
 

RecruitingGuru

Making Recruiting Great Again
When I came in, to commission you had to renounce any foreign citizenship. My understanding is the rules have changed and there are cases where you can hold dual citizenship and still get clearance:


You're better off discussing with an officer recruiter rather than the sea lawyers here though.
No. 100% no. He needs to renounce his dual citizenship. Your gouge from when you joined 14 years ago might not be as accurate to today's process to join.
 

Brett327

Well-Known Member
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
DoD personnel do not fall under DNI policy. That’s what you get when your reference is Clearance Jobs Dot Com instead of DoD directives.
 

snake020

Well-Known Member
Contributor
DoD personnel do not fall under DNI policy. That’s what you get when your reference is Clearance Jobs Dot Com instead of DoD directives.
Ok, but where are your references? For example, this PA for Intel Officer from Apr 2019 says it's not.

"4.h.5.b: Being a dual citizen (i.e., a U.S. citizen and a citizen of another country) is not necessarily disqualifying. Associated risks to national security will be determined on a case-by-case basis, refer to ICD 704."
 
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