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Pilot TAR Question

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DreaminBig-Ken

Registered User
What are the basic and true advantages of being a TAR pilot. Is the C-9 still around and what about the plane that was to replace it? The commercial looking plane. I think it was the C-40 Clipper if I remember correctly. How's that going? I'm really intersted in flying and I'm studying for the ATSB right now. I'd fly any plane honestly. I'm not a true fan of helos though. That's why I hope I'm not in that "fitting the need of the Navy" class and get "put somewhere. I'm applying for the BDCP program and if I don't make it I'll just apply to OCS once I graduate several months from now. Any info would be nice. Thanks.
 

bch

Helo Bubba
pilot
Something to consider RIGHT NOW.

The chances of being in the "fitting the needs of the navy" category is high. If this is something you are not all right with, I would seriously reconsider your decision.

I used to think the same way, "to hell with helos, nothing but slow boring machines, flown by the guys who did not do too well in flight school."

Then I actually went to helo squadron and saw what the community, mission and aircraft were REALLY all about. From that point on, you could not have paid me enough to go to another community.

As far as TAR, the only fact I know about it is, that you cannot go TAR right out of flight school. Your choices out of primary will be, Jets (kingsville or meridian), E-2C, P-3, TACAMO, and helos.

Not sure if you can go TAR after your first sea tour or if it is after your committment is up, webmaster may have some better gouge.

I encourage you to ask around and read some of the different posts about each of the communities so that you can make an informed decision when it comes time to selection. If you have any questions please feel free to ask or PM people who are in the diff communities.
 

zab1001

Well-Known Member
pilot
Super Moderator
Contributor
TAR (C-9s, C-20s, C-130s, etc) isn't an option until you finish your initial comitment.
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
As a TAR you will fly plenty and will deploy with your squadron. With the current war on terror I expect the TARs are seeing as many deployments as active duty land based guys. Of course the character of a reserve squadron is a bit different then an active one. The aircraft are in just as good shape, better if you are in a new C-40 unit. As stated, you do have to complete your first sea duty tour and any other obligation left over on active duty before you can apply for TAR pilot/NFO.
 

bunk22

Super *********
pilot
Super Moderator
Must remember as well that making rank, greater than O-4, is a bit more difficult in TAR land. As I understand, an O-4 will have to get an OIC position to be competitive. Like others have said, TAR is only available at the end of your contract so your looking at anywhere from 6-8 years after wings. I applied to TAR on two occasions but was a bit to senior and not accepted.
 

jg5343

FLY NAVY...Divers need the work
pilot
Training and Administration of Reserves (TAR)

Basically, you are the active duty guy on reserve ships and shore installations.
 
So if you chose to go TAR it would be after your disassociated sea tour? How long would you be with a particular squadron in TAR land?
 

wink

VS NFO. Blue and Gold Officer
None
Super Moderator
Contributor
You can apply for TAR after your original committment is up. In practical terms that means after your first shore duty assignment. Rotation between sea/shore or in and out of a squadron is basicly the same as if on regular active duty.
 

bunk22

Super *********
pilot
Super Moderator
joeschmoe said:
So if you chose to go TAR it would be after your disassociated sea tour? How long would you be with a particular squadron in TAR land?
If accepted to TAR, you can only enter after your service obligation is up. Most tours with a sqadron start off at three years. At least that's what I've seen from my TAR buddies.
 

bunk22

Super *********
pilot
Super Moderator
wink said:
You can apply for TAR after your original committment is up. In practical terms that means after your first shore duty assignment. Rotation between sea/shore or in and out of a squadron is basicly the same as if on regular active duty.
Actually, the current rules state that one cannot apply until 18 mos prior to the the end of their MSR or PRD, which ever occurs last.
 

boilersmack

E-6 Driver
I heard TAR is like a fraternity and they have to like you first before you have a chance of being able to do it besides also finishing your first commitment
 

bunk22

Super *********
pilot
Super Moderator
boilersmack said:
I heard TAR is like a fraternity and they have to like you first before you have a chance of being able to do it besides also finishing your first commitment
You might be confusing SELRES (selective reserve) with TAR. With TAR, there are two boards every year and you send a package. It's reviewed and you are selected from there. With the regular reserves, you send a package to the particular squadron you want and they determine from there if they want you. It is kind of like pledging for a fraternity. Just the other day, one of the pilots came over from VR-57 to ask about a couple of C-2 guys trying to get in with their squadron. He simply wanted our opinion of the pledges.
 
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